• Professional Handheld Moving Coil Microphone - Dynamic Cardioid Unidirectional Vocal, Built-in Acoustic Pop Filter, Includes 15ft XLR Audio Cable to 1/4'' Audio Connection - PylePro PDMIC78
  • Professional Handheld Moving Coil Microphone - Dynamic Cardioid Unidirectional Vocal, Built-in Acoustic Pop Filter, Includes 15ft XLR Audio Cable to 1/4'' Audio Connection - PylePro PDMIC78
  • Professional Handheld Moving Coil Microphone - Dynamic Cardioid Unidirectional Vocal, Built-in Acoustic Pop Filter, Includes 15ft XLR Audio Cable to 1/4'' Audio Connection - PylePro PDMIC78
  • Professional Handheld Moving Coil Microphone - Dynamic Cardioid Unidirectional Vocal, Built-in Acoustic Pop Filter, Includes 15ft XLR Audio Cable to 1/4'' Audio Connection - PylePro PDMIC78
  • Professional Handheld Moving Coil Microphone - Dynamic Cardioid Unidirectional Vocal, Built-in Acoustic Pop Filter, Includes 15ft XLR Audio Cable to 1/4'' Audio Connection - PylePro PDMIC78
  • Professional Handheld Moving Coil Microphone - Dynamic Cardioid Unidirectional Vocal, Built-in Acoustic Pop Filter, Includes 15ft XLR Audio Cable to 1/4'' Audio Connection - PylePro PDMIC78
  • Professional Handheld Moving Coil Microphone - Dynamic Cardioid Unidirectional Vocal, Built-in Acoustic Pop Filter, Includes 15ft XLR Audio Cable to 1/4'' Audio Connection - PylePro PDMIC78
Professional Handheld Moving Coil Microphone - Dynamic Cardioid Unidirectional Vocal, Built-in Acoustic Pop Filter, Includes 15ft XLR Audio Cable to 1/4'' Audio Connection - PylePro PDMIC78
Professional Handheld Moving Coil Microphone - Dynamic Cardioid Unidirectional Vocal, Built-in Acoustic Pop Filter, Includes 15ft XLR Audio Cable to 1/4'' Audio Connection - PylePro PDMIC78
Professional Handheld Moving Coil Microphone - Dynamic Cardioid Unidirectional Vocal, Built-in Acoustic Pop Filter, Includes 15ft XLR Audio Cable to 1/4'' Audio Connection - PylePro PDMIC78
Professional Handheld Moving Coil Microphone - Dynamic Cardioid Unidirectional Vocal, Built-in Acoustic Pop Filter, Includes 15ft XLR Audio Cable to 1/4'' Audio Connection - PylePro PDMIC78
Professional Handheld Moving Coil Microphone - Dynamic Cardioid Unidirectional Vocal, Built-in Acoustic Pop Filter, Includes 15ft XLR Audio Cable to 1/4'' Audio Connection - PylePro PDMIC78
Professional Handheld Moving Coil Microphone - Dynamic Cardioid Unidirectional Vocal, Built-in Acoustic Pop Filter, Includes 15ft XLR Audio Cable to 1/4'' Audio Connection - PylePro PDMIC78
Professional Handheld Moving Coil Microphone - Dynamic Cardioid Unidirectional Vocal, Built-in Acoustic Pop Filter, Includes 15ft XLR Audio Cable to 1/4'' Audio Connection - PylePro PDMIC78

Professional Handheld Moving Coil Microphone - Dynamic Cardioid Unidirectional Vocal, Built-in Acoustic Pop Filter, Includes 15ft XLR Audio Cable to 1/4'' Audio Connection - PylePro PDMIC78

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MRP: €37,20
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  • UNIDIRECTIONAL SIGNAL: Cardioid pickup pattern captures source signal such as guitar amp or vocalist while shunning off-axis sound minimizing background noise & feedback reproducing audio w/out interference from instruments or speakers on stage
  • DYNAMIC MICROPHONE: For optimal clarity and punch, robust & resistant to moisture, achieving high gain before feedback, makes this microphone ideal for live vocal applications and for recording amplified instruments
  • ULTRA-WIDE FREQUENCY RESPONSE: For brilliant and transparent sound with integrated pop filter and windscreen to minimize breath and pop noises you can count on it to come through after countless gigs and studio applications
  • CABLE INCLUDED: Professional grade 15 ft. XLR-to-1/4 cable supplied. This Pyle PDMIC78 is perfect for your bedroom, professional studios and on-stage vocal performances all over the globe
  • HIGH QUALITY CONSTRUCTION: Rugged, all-metal construction for maximum reliability featuring a zinc die-cast case and steel mesh windscreen with an anti-dent ring. A perfect all-purpose, versatile stage and recording microphone
  • Consumer Alert: Most users do not need a license to operate this wireless microphone system. Nevertheless, operating this microphone system without a license is subject to certain restrictions: the system may not cause harmful interference; it must operate at a low power level (not in excess of 50 milliwatts); and it has no protection from interference received from any other device.
  • Purchasers should also be aware that the FCC is currently evaluating use of wireless microphone systems, and these rules are subject to change. For more information, call the FCC at 1-888- CALL-FCC (TTY: 1-888-TELL-FCC) or visit the FCC's wireless microphone website at fcc.gov/cgb/wirelessmicrophones.

Customer Reviews

Honestly as good as versatile as my 57, but it's a different mic Just like the title says, this mic has become a go to in my home studio. I waited about a month to review (bought oct 17 2018) as I hate all the people praising products after 1 use. I've been using it on a twin speaker Fender combo reverb, with a SM57, each shotgunned to the center of each cone. If there's enough interest I can post up some of my samples.When used with the 57 on the amp the results are nice. The 57 gives you a very muddy, dry bottom end which I like a lot but usually end up sticking in the back of an open amp and using a pencil mic on the front to get the high end. This mic has much more higher mid range than I get on the 57 so it's working as a great pairing mic. I've been bringing it up more in my mixes to a 60/40 (78/57) mix for each track. It shines really well on good distortion and bassy clean tracks.I've paired it with my acoustic in a booth and got mixed results. It felt like there was no air to it which is to be expected from any directional mic in a booth, but the 57 definitely felt more alive in that application.I've paired it on singing in the same booth and got what felt much better and added a more clear picture to the vocals but the bottom end was definitely absent. I've just set up a new drum kit that I plan on using these on so I'll report back when I've tried that out a bit.I'd be fine giving this 5 stars as a perfect SM57 replacement if it were better on the acoustic/vocals but honestly, this is a pretty darn good mic. It does plenty to good to warrant buying just to see for yourself. It was $15 when I bought and they've since dropped to about $11. If it sounds good on my toms, I'll be ordering a few more. 4Not a bad 57 clone No, this isn't an SM-57, nor can you compare it to one. BUT, it's not a bad mic, especially considering the price! It is lighter than a 57. I have used it in the bottom of a snare and it does fine with the spl level. Have also used it to mic guitar with success. Would this mic take the rigors of a touring band?? Probably not. But I feel if you have a home studio and are on a limited budget, these microphones fill a notch. I would not record a vocal track with it, but as a general instrument ic, it does ok. 4Pyle-Pro 57 Clone Microphone Bought 2 of these Mics May 10, 2018 here on Amazon for $2 cheaper ($12.49) after see a Review of them on YouTube (intheblues channel). I've been a Professional Musician for 53yrs and have heard of Pyle Speakers but never new they made Mics also. I put it up against a Shure 57 and the Pyle sounds as good if not better (REALLY SURPRISED), getting more highs and bottom end while mids stayed the same as the Shure. Volume was a little hotter. Also not as muddy sounding with the same EQ setting. I set the EQ for the 57 then plugged in the Pyle with the same cord. Sounded much better than the 57! Of course the Pyle is not as heavy and the wiring is much cheaper but there was no handling noise as some have said. The Cord that's included is junk!! Use a decent regular XLR Cable, the one that comes with the Mic only generates about 3/4s the volume as an XLR cable. There is No Mic Clip or Carry Bag included in the box but Clips are cheap and I bought Carry Bags for both here for $3ea. Good Purchase as far as I'm concerned and will probably buy a couple more even at $14 ea. Can't beat the Price. 5and wire this up to sound just as good as one Not an SM-57. But....you can buy a transformer for 10 bucks, and wire this up to sound just as good as one. So...there's that. Or if you want a "modded", transformerless SM-57 sound, just wire the outputs balanced (they're unbalanced from the factory for no good reason), and you're in.All in all, pretty useless as-is, but if you have a basic understanding of signal flow and some soldering skills, it's a ballpark facsimile of an SM-57 with the "transformerless" mod, if you wire it balanced. I dropped in a transformer from a dead 57 I had in a parts bin into one of these, and side-by-side, couldn't tell a difference worth measuring between this and an actual 57.Get a half-dozen, they're awesome! 5Clear sound on toms and snare, and handles loud sounds just fine There are a good handful of Chinese copies of the famous Shure SM57. I have tried a few of them, and generally been pleased. But once they get discovered, the price usually goes up dramatically. This one I bought for about fifteen dollars, which I would call a screaming deal. I actually bought three, and will probably pick up three more. I have used them in my home studio to record toms and snare, and they do great at both. There really isn't a significant sound difference between them and the Shure, or my other clones. I am quite pleased with their recorded tone, and also by their handling of high levels of sound, particularly on the snare drum. Their off-axis rejection is also on par with the others. The only concern I have with them is the long-term reliability, and I can't vouch for that yet. I might come back in a year to update this review if they are still being sold on Amazon. 5Outstanding for the bargain basement price... Ok. Here's more information than you ever wanted to know about this mic. But first a story that actually IS relevant. :DI've been in recording for a LONG time. Going back to my first studio in the analog days, I had a Tascam 8 Track open reel machine. Most of those recordings were made in the untreated living room of a rental house and I swear many of them still sound great to this day. Then I made the jump to digital with an ADAT machine which I used for years. Now I record on a PC with a DAW. So we've come a long way baby.Anyway, back in the analog days all of the pro-sound guys were trying out this new 'hack' for an SM57 mic. Basically, you used heat to loosen the glue and remove the transformer, then put the mic back together. The transformerless SM57 was a revelation. It kept the better qualities of the mic, while opening up the top end and increasing the output.I said all that to say this. Basically the PDMIC78 is just that...an SM57 without a transformer. It's capsule is completely identical to an SM57. So for $13 you get the 'modified' SM57 that we all experimented with back in the 80's and 90's.Trust me. Buy a couple. Throw 'em on toms, which is where they really shine. The extra bit of air/upper mids is just what the doctor ordered on toms. You WILL thank me. 5in a band mix this will crowd up the sound and not be good. Not a good mic for a vocalist in ... CONS FIRST:1)Extremely microphonic housing, rubbing it with your fingers will come through in the PA system, in a band mix this will crowd up the sound and not be good. Not a good mic for a vocalist in a band.2)I read these are wired into mono and not XLR even though the connection is XLR, this can be modded with a small amount of soldering, but why would they do this in the first place? It makes no sense and without the MOD you get more interference from fluorescent lights, microwaves, radio signals, 60 cycle hum, etc.3) Like most cheap Chinese mics the capsule produces a bright sound, certainly brighter than the 57 it's modeled after, which by itself can be totally fine, but you start to stack these guys up in a mix it becomes an icepick assault on your eardrums. Could this be remedied with a careful eq'ing? Possibly. But any sound tech with the most basic understanding will tell you: The most important parts of the signal chain are in this order; source-->mic-->board/eq/fx-->speakers. This means lousy source i.e. bad musician, than all the best gear can't fix that. Case in point cheap mic capsules don't mix real well and don't eq well, so be very wary of you plan on buying these for a full band, it can be done, but you will need some mixing skills and should be prepared to compromise the overall sound a little.4) Proximity effect seems to be a little more pronounced than a 57 but this isn't a con, more of an observation.PROS:The PRICE!For the money, you really have no reason not to try it. They do sound great and the brightness can be rolled off, if these mounted on a stand they can serve as workhorses for drums, guitars, brass, vocals, podcasts, the list goes on.And at $12 bucks a mic, if one breaks? Chuck it. High school kids band walked off with a few at a gig you ran? No biggie. Son thinks it's a toy submarine and throws it in the bathtub? Well Launch the torpedos! I mean it's $12. I spend more at chipotle to get a burrito with some of that sweet, sweet guacamole. 5Unreal price on a professionally useable mic that's very close to it's real deal design influence... This is very close to a Shure SM-57, so much so that I am not sure if myself and other recording enthusiasts could pass the A-B blindfold test. It is a bit brighter than my mid '90's SM-57, but the Pyle is basically what a transformer-less SM-57 mod sounds like. Many engineers remove the transformer from one of their 57's to give it more top end and air, it's a quite common modification. The Pyle MIC78 is a no brainer for anyone who has a home studio or does gigs where there are lots of mics going to the board. I bought two and am probably going to pick a few more up...at that price it is so hard to resist.They aren't made with the same care and quality as a Shure mic is so be careful with the leads disconnecting (re soldering the entire mics innards is probably a great idea), the input jack on one of mine was fine but the other was a bit snug. That's why it's good to buy multiples of the Pyle because it's obvious there are some sloppy ones amongst the good ones. I am thinking of putting a transformer into one to see just how close it can get to an SM-57...it is a modders dream mic.This is a case of getting so much more than what you pay for, just keep expectations in check. Yes they are really, REALLY close to the Shure classic but they are made overseas and need some TLC to last. Don't throw these across stage like you would an old SM-58 that reeks of beer. This is more of a studio mic for guitar amps, drums (snare, toms) and even acoustic guitar & vocals. I used one pointed at the bridge of my acoustic, three feet away, and mixed it with a large condenser at around the 12th fret spot a few feet from the guitar and it was great when blended. The Pyle added some sizzle to the condensers steak, capturing the pick attack and some nice upper harmonics on strummed chords; the condenser captured the body and fullness of the guitar with its own air and lightness up top. Great combination.Very recommended for recording, playing live (just don't throw them around) and just as a cool extra few mics in the locker to be used to experiment and comfortably replace that extra SM-57 you may need but don't have. Pyle has surprised me big time... 5Surprising quality sound on the cheap I'm a working musician. I play in a working band that plays every weekend and 3 to 4 days during the week each month. I bought these to have on stage for that occasion when someone in the crowd ask to come sit in. I was shocked at how good they sound. They're no 57 but for the $11 I paid they are well worth it. I'm using them now around the studio to get different sounds on different tracks when the band records live. If your just getting into music or doing karaoke these would be go to mic for me! Plus they are good to have just in case a 57 goes down and I need a backup to mic instruments. 5Compared in hand to several excellent clones and a real SM57 Compared in hand to several excellent clones and a real SM57. Using the Pyle cable that comes with it on all compared Mics, including the SM57, by ear, same output device, -- no difference.The lesser weight is due to no transformer in the Pyle, and therefor lower price. Otherwise, is a SM57 without the transformer, so to speak. Now, someone using a scope may say different, but, considering all the output devices, again, -- you won't hear it. So, yes, do make sure the Phantom power is off with this one. No transformer means that voltage does go to the diaphragm. I don't know that it would withstand a full phantom power source. It might ... just watch your powered boards, etc.Without the transformer in it, these will always be a much lower priced item. I did not diseasemble it and compare anthing else. My feeling is, the guts of it are essentially a commodity item at this point. Copper is copper, etc.; actually the gauge wire in this Pyle appeared heavier, however slight. Since the metal case is grounded that makes it a shielded container if in the ground chain in your circuit.The metal Screen over the diaphragm appears slightly different from the SM57, a non-issue for me. Also, is use a foam screen over mine anyway, since like to keep any mic clean/sanitary. A foam sock is easy to rinse, or otherwise pull off for close speaker, instrument micing.All things staying the same, I will buy again, as needed. I just don't need to spend the extra ~$90 to look at a Name. 4
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Reviews

Customer Reviews

Honestly as good as versatile as my 57, but it's a different mic Just like the title says, this mic has become a go to in my home studio. I waited about a month to review (bought oct 17 2018) as I hate all the people praising products after 1 use. I've been using it on a twin speaker Fender combo reverb, with a SM57, each shotgunned to the center of each cone. If there's enough interest I can post up some of my samples.When used with the 57 on the amp the results are nice. The 57 gives you a very muddy, dry bottom end which I like a lot but usually end up sticking in the back of an open amp and using a pencil mic on the front to get the high end. This mic has much more higher mid range than I get on the 57 so it's working as a great pairing mic. I've been bringing it up more in my mixes to a 60/40 (78/57) mix for each track. It shines really well on good distortion and bassy clean tracks.I've paired it with my acoustic in a booth and got mixed results. It felt like there was no air to it which is to be expected from any directional mic in a booth, but the 57 definitely felt more alive in that application.I've paired it on singing in the same booth and got what felt much better and added a more clear picture to the vocals but the bottom end was definitely absent. I've just set up a new drum kit that I plan on using these on so I'll report back when I've tried that out a bit.I'd be fine giving this 5 stars as a perfect SM57 replacement if it were better on the acoustic/vocals but honestly, this is a pretty darn good mic. It does plenty to good to warrant buying just to see for yourself. It was $15 when I bought and they've since dropped to about $11. If it sounds good on my toms, I'll be ordering a few more. 4Not a bad 57 clone No, this isn't an SM-57, nor can you compare it to one. BUT, it's not a bad mic, especially considering the price! It is lighter than a 57. I have used it in the bottom of a snare and it does fine with the spl level. Have also used it to mic guitar with success. Would this mic take the rigors of a touring band?? Probably not. But I feel if you have a home studio and are on a limited budget, these microphones fill a notch. I would not record a vocal track with it, but as a general instrument ic, it does ok. 4Pyle-Pro 57 Clone Microphone Bought 2 of these Mics May 10, 2018 here on Amazon for $2 cheaper ($12.49) after see a Review of them on YouTube (intheblues channel). I've been a Professional Musician for 53yrs and have heard of Pyle Speakers but never new they made Mics also. I put it up against a Shure 57 and the Pyle sounds as good if not better (REALLY SURPRISED), getting more highs and bottom end while mids stayed the same as the Shure. Volume was a little hotter. Also not as muddy sounding with the same EQ setting. I set the EQ for the 57 then plugged in the Pyle with the same cord. Sounded much better than the 57! Of course the Pyle is not as heavy and the wiring is much cheaper but there was no handling noise as some have said. The Cord that's included is junk!! Use a decent regular XLR Cable, the one that comes with the Mic only generates about 3/4s the volume as an XLR cable. There is No Mic Clip or Carry Bag included in the box but Clips are cheap and I bought Carry Bags for both here for $3ea. Good Purchase as far as I'm concerned and will probably buy a couple more even at $14 ea. Can't beat the Price. 5and wire this up to sound just as good as one Not an SM-57. But....you can buy a transformer for 10 bucks, and wire this up to sound just as good as one. So...there's that. Or if you want a "modded", transformerless SM-57 sound, just wire the outputs balanced (they're unbalanced from the factory for no good reason), and you're in.All in all, pretty useless as-is, but if you have a basic understanding of signal flow and some soldering skills, it's a ballpark facsimile of an SM-57 with the "transformerless" mod, if you wire it balanced. I dropped in a transformer from a dead 57 I had in a parts bin into one of these, and side-by-side, couldn't tell a difference worth measuring between this and an actual 57.Get a half-dozen, they're awesome! 5Clear sound on toms and snare, and handles loud sounds just fine There are a good handful of Chinese copies of the famous Shure SM57. I have tried a few of them, and generally been pleased. But once they get discovered, the price usually goes up dramatically. This one I bought for about fifteen dollars, which I would call a screaming deal. I actually bought three, and will probably pick up three more. I have used them in my home studio to record toms and snare, and they do great at both. There really isn't a significant sound difference between them and the Shure, or my other clones. I am quite pleased with their recorded tone, and also by their handling of high levels of sound, particularly on the snare drum. Their off-axis rejection is also on par with the others. The only concern I have with them is the long-term reliability, and I can't vouch for that yet. I might come back in a year to update this review if they are still being sold on Amazon. 5Outstanding for the bargain basement price... Ok. Here's more information than you ever wanted to know about this mic. But first a story that actually IS relevant. :DI've been in recording for a LONG time. Going back to my first studio in the analog days, I had a Tascam 8 Track open reel machine. Most of those recordings were made in the untreated living room of a rental house and I swear many of them still sound great to this day. Then I made the jump to digital with an ADAT machine which I used for years. Now I record on a PC with a DAW. So we've come a long way baby.Anyway, back in the analog days all of the pro-sound guys were trying out this new 'hack' for an SM57 mic. Basically, you used heat to loosen the glue and remove the transformer, then put the mic back together. The transformerless SM57 was a revelation. It kept the better qualities of the mic, while opening up the top end and increasing the output.I said all that to say this. Basically the PDMIC78 is just that...an SM57 without a transformer. It's capsule is completely identical to an SM57. So for $13 you get the 'modified' SM57 that we all experimented with back in the 80's and 90's.Trust me. Buy a couple. Throw 'em on toms, which is where they really shine. The extra bit of air/upper mids is just what the doctor ordered on toms. You WILL thank me. 5in a band mix this will crowd up the sound and not be good. Not a good mic for a vocalist in ... CONS FIRST:1)Extremely microphonic housing, rubbing it with your fingers will come through in the PA system, in a band mix this will crowd up the sound and not be good. Not a good mic for a vocalist in a band.2)I read these are wired into mono and not XLR even though the connection is XLR, this can be modded with a small amount of soldering, but why would they do this in the first place? It makes no sense and without the MOD you get more interference from fluorescent lights, microwaves, radio signals, 60 cycle hum, etc.3) Like most cheap Chinese mics the capsule produces a bright sound, certainly brighter than the 57 it's modeled after, which by itself can be totally fine, but you start to stack these guys up in a mix it becomes an icepick assault on your eardrums. Could this be remedied with a careful eq'ing? Possibly. But any sound tech with the most basic understanding will tell you: The most important parts of the signal chain are in this order; source-->mic-->board/eq/fx-->speakers. This means lousy source i.e. bad musician, than all the best gear can't fix that. Case in point cheap mic capsules don't mix real well and don't eq well, so be very wary of you plan on buying these for a full band, it can be done, but you will need some mixing skills and should be prepared to compromise the overall sound a little.4) Proximity effect seems to be a little more pronounced than a 57 but this isn't a con, more of an observation.PROS:The PRICE!For the money, you really have no reason not to try it. They do sound great and the brightness can be rolled off, if these mounted on a stand they can serve as workhorses for drums, guitars, brass, vocals, podcasts, the list goes on.And at $12 bucks a mic, if one breaks? Chuck it. High school kids band walked off with a few at a gig you ran? No biggie. Son thinks it's a toy submarine and throws it in the bathtub? Well Launch the torpedos! I mean it's $12. I spend more at chipotle to get a burrito with some of that sweet, sweet guacamole. 5Unreal price on a professionally useable mic that's very close to it's real deal design influence... This is very close to a Shure SM-57, so much so that I am not sure if myself and other recording enthusiasts could pass the A-B blindfold test. It is a bit brighter than my mid '90's SM-57, but the Pyle is basically what a transformer-less SM-57 mod sounds like. Many engineers remove the transformer from one of their 57's to give it more top end and air, it's a quite common modification. The Pyle MIC78 is a no brainer for anyone who has a home studio or does gigs where there are lots of mics going to the board. I bought two and am probably going to pick a few more up...at that price it is so hard to resist.They aren't made with the same care and quality as a Shure mic is so be careful with the leads disconnecting (re soldering the entire mics innards is probably a great idea), the input jack on one of mine was fine but the other was a bit snug. That's why it's good to buy multiples of the Pyle because it's obvious there are some sloppy ones amongst the good ones. I am thinking of putting a transformer into one to see just how close it can get to an SM-57...it is a modders dream mic.This is a case of getting so much more than what you pay for, just keep expectations in check. Yes they are really, REALLY close to the Shure classic but they are made overseas and need some TLC to last. Don't throw these across stage like you would an old SM-58 that reeks of beer. This is more of a studio mic for guitar amps, drums (snare, toms) and even acoustic guitar & vocals. I used one pointed at the bridge of my acoustic, three feet away, and mixed it with a large condenser at around the 12th fret spot a few feet from the guitar and it was great when blended. The Pyle added some sizzle to the condensers steak, capturing the pick attack and some nice upper harmonics on strummed chords; the condenser captured the body and fullness of the guitar with its own air and lightness up top. Great combination.Very recommended for recording, playing live (just don't throw them around) and just as a cool extra few mics in the locker to be used to experiment and comfortably replace that extra SM-57 you may need but don't have. Pyle has surprised me big time... 5Surprising quality sound on the cheap I'm a working musician. I play in a working band that plays every weekend and 3 to 4 days during the week each month. I bought these to have on stage for that occasion when someone in the crowd ask to come sit in. I was shocked at how good they sound. They're no 57 but for the $11 I paid they are well worth it. I'm using them now around the studio to get different sounds on different tracks when the band records live. If your just getting into music or doing karaoke these would be go to mic for me! Plus they are good to have just in case a 57 goes down and I need a backup to mic instruments. 5Compared in hand to several excellent clones and a real SM57 Compared in hand to several excellent clones and a real SM57. Using the Pyle cable that comes with it on all compared Mics, including the SM57, by ear, same output device, -- no difference.The lesser weight is due to no transformer in the Pyle, and therefor lower price. Otherwise, is a SM57 without the transformer, so to speak. Now, someone using a scope may say different, but, considering all the output devices, again, -- you won't hear it. So, yes, do make sure the Phantom power is off with this one. No transformer means that voltage does go to the diaphragm. I don't know that it would withstand a full phantom power source. It might ... just watch your powered boards, etc.Without the transformer in it, these will always be a much lower priced item. I did not diseasemble it and compare anthing else. My feeling is, the guts of it are essentially a commodity item at this point. Copper is copper, etc.; actually the gauge wire in this Pyle appeared heavier, however slight. Since the metal case is grounded that makes it a shielded container if in the ground chain in your circuit.The metal Screen over the diaphragm appears slightly different from the SM57, a non-issue for me. Also, is use a foam screen over mine anyway, since like to keep any mic clean/sanitary. A foam sock is easy to rinse, or otherwise pull off for close speaker, instrument micing.All things staying the same, I will buy again, as needed. I just don't need to spend the extra ~$90 to look at a Name. 4
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