• Elecom Wired Index Finger Operation Trackball Mouse, Ergonomic Design, 2.4 G Hz, 8 Buttons/Black/M Dt2
  • Elecom Wired Index Finger Operation Trackball Mouse, Ergonomic Design, 2.4 G Hz, 8 Buttons/Black/M Dt2
  • Elecom Wired Index Finger Operation Trackball Mouse, Ergonomic Design, 2.4 G Hz, 8 Buttons/Black/M Dt2
  • Elecom Wired Index Finger Operation Trackball Mouse, Ergonomic Design, 2.4 G Hz, 8 Buttons/Black/M Dt2
  • Elecom Wired Index Finger Operation Trackball Mouse, Ergonomic Design, 2.4 G Hz, 8 Buttons/Black/M Dt2
  • Elecom Wired Index Finger Operation Trackball Mouse, Ergonomic Design, 2.4 G Hz, 8 Buttons/Black/M Dt2
Elecom Wired Index Finger Operation Trackball Mouse, Ergonomic Design, 2.4 G Hz, 8 Buttons/Black/M Dt2
Elecom Wired Index Finger Operation Trackball Mouse, Ergonomic Design, 2.4 G Hz, 8 Buttons/Black/M Dt2
Elecom Wired Index Finger Operation Trackball Mouse, Ergonomic Design, 2.4 G Hz, 8 Buttons/Black/M Dt2
Elecom Wired Index Finger Operation Trackball Mouse, Ergonomic Design, 2.4 G Hz, 8 Buttons/Black/M Dt2
Elecom Wired Index Finger Operation Trackball Mouse, Ergonomic Design, 2.4 G Hz, 8 Buttons/Black/M Dt2
Elecom Wired Index Finger Operation Trackball Mouse, Ergonomic Design, 2.4 G Hz, 8 Buttons/Black/M Dt2

Elecom Wired Index Finger Operation Trackball Mouse, Ergonomic Design, 2.4 G Hz, 8 Buttons/Black/M Dt2

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MRP: €76,00
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€126,00
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Expected Delivery: 21-28 days
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  • ELECOM acquired FCC certification. Comes with both English and Japanese manuals
  • Changing the common sense of index finger operated, index finger operated type USB trackball 'DEFT'
  • With Back/Forward quick navigation buttons. Thumb-operated ball with advanced gaming sensor. For exceptionally smooth tracking
  • Ball diameter size is 2.5mm. Ergonomic design of the thumb ball operation. Left/Right button made by OMRON
  • With Back/Forward quick navigation buttons. With scroll Wheel. Resolution: 750/1500 count (switchable). It is easy to remove the ball, you could clean the hole easy. Simple package

Customer Reviews

I really wanted to love this product, but sadly, it is unusable. I wanted to love this product. I really, really, wanted to love this. I really needed to love this. But sadly, it is unusable.For the last 15 years I have been using a Microsoft Trackball Explorer, which is on its last legs. Unfortunately, it was discontinued nearly a decade ago. I was looking for a new trackball that can be operated with the middle/index fingers, has a scroll wheel and 5 or more easily accessible and customizeable buttons for my CAD program. The more buttons, the better. This seemed to be the perfect solution. Except, it isn't.Here are the problems:The trackball is too small. I have average size hands and my hand was cramping after a few hours of use.The ball itself is too small and can not be controlled precisely.The left-most button, which is default to left-click, is pretty much impossible to use. It can be actuated only when pressed all the way at its forward tip. But when you hold your hand that far forward, the wheel and the ball are too far back and impossible to use.The wheel button is too just too stiff to be usable.The tilt buttons on the wheel are also too stiff. The left tilt (down) button can be used if you are actuating the wheel with the tip of the thumb, but the right tilt (up) button can not be pressed.The right button is extremely awkward. The narrow button sitting up from the body is too tall to be actuated by a finger resting on the body and too narrow to rest the finger on it, not that it would be comfortable in that awkward position. A setup like they have on their thumb operated trackball (buttons flush with the body) wold have been significantly better and would provide one more button.The only way to use this trackball is to have your hand way back on the trackball, with your palm resting on the table and tips of the fingers at the ball. To make this work you will have to assign the left click function to the left back button (located above and to the rear of the tilt wheel) and abandon the the default left click button, the left forward button, the track wheel button and the track wheel tilt. But then you are left with a 5 button trackball with a very awkward right click button and a ball too small to be controlled accurately. That is what gets the two stars.I believe this product has great potential. By making the body a little bigger, moving a few things around, using less stiff switches and using a bigger ball, they can have a home run! 2Closest you can get to the great late MS Trackball Explorer but non-slip pads aren't really glued to the bottom Last update:There is no warranty or support available from Elecom in the US. Amazon gave up looking for any contact information, offered a return but I am keeping the mouse even if I will have to remove the rubber pads eventually and glue the damn thing to my desk.Update:Ordered another mouse, really nice, the wheel button not as rigid, but after 3 weeks one rubber pad has moved, and there are glue smudges all around it. I want to keep the mouse even if I have to remove or re-glue the pads. Trying to get manufacturer contact information from Amazon.Update 1.5 month later:The mouse refused to stay in place, so I ordered a no-slip dashboard silicone pad. The mouse still drifts, less than it does on the desk finish, but:The glue used on the 4 non-slip pads on the bottom of the mouse became soft, and the pads (3 out of 4) have moved from their places revealing almost liquid sticky glue. I don't know if the silicone pad has that effect, but glue is supposed to stay solid, otherwise it would be called molasses.Amazon graciously took it back, I ordered another one, if it happens again, I'm out.Original review:I love this little trackball. Now when my last two MS Trackball Explorers die, I won't be left in mouse limbo.I am not crazy about the shape and location of the right button, and the wheel button is way too hard to press, but with 10 customizable buttons and flying scroll (and I didn't even get to Profiles yet!) I can overlook that. Well done Elecom! 3A novel and intuitive approach to the index-driven trackball design So I know a lot of the reviews for this mouse mention poor quality control, and inconsistent performance: I found the build quality and performance actually exceeded my expectations. Granted I only purchased a solitary mouse, so it is possible I have a 'good' one...maybe they aren't all like this, but mine is stellar.I am the proud owner (and daily user) of what seems to have become the most coveted of all trackball input devices: the Microsoft Trackball Explorer 1.0 (commonly seen on Amazon selling for $695.00 NIB). I purchased the ELECOM Track ball mouse as a temporary stand-in, with the possibility of a permanent replacement. My MS Explorer is getting a very long in the tooth, and needs to be send out for a rebuild and bearing replacement (yes....this is a thing. There is an entire subculture around MS Trackball Explorer ownership).I choose the Elecom as a potential replacement/substitute primarily for it's form factor: while the track ball is much much smaller than the MS Explorer, the overall form factor of the chassis is along a similar ergonomic theme, unlike another pair of contenders by Kensington that I've already purchased, tried out and moved on from.The trackball is small, but moves extremely smoothly, requiring only a very light touch. The tracking seems very homogenous, with no discernible bias on the X/Y or anything like that. The buttons are mostly intuitive, but I find the the 'left click' button location takes a bit of getting used to (it's a middle finger affair).This mouse chassis does not "move": it might look like a typical laser mouse, but it's strictly an index-finger driven trackball design. I give this 5 stars, even though I do believe there is one area for improvement: a Bluetooth model. USB ports are few and far between on today's modern ultrabooks (my 15" Macbook Pro Retina only has 2), and using one for a mouse seems very....dated.So if you are looking for an accurate and ergonomic alternative to the giant-ball options from the other manufacturers...give this a try. It's not the cheapest item, but I found that for my purposes, it is worth every penny. 5Darn it. I was excited to get the ELECOM Wireless trackball mouse for the index finger. I have been looking for a viable solution to the Logitech Trackman for several years. I thought this was finally the answer.I use my computer day and night. I'm homebound, almost bedbound. My computer is my lifeline and is only not in use when I sleep. I read, do puzzles, cruise, shop...everything. All this is extremely mouse intensive. I also have a tendency for tendonitis and since opposable thumbs make us humans able to do many things, the loss of thumb use due to pain or injury is not a good thing. That said, I wanted something as smooth and gentle on my thumb as possible. This mouse isn't it.The scroll wheel and the left click are thumb controlled. This requires continuous, repetitive action on the big joint of the thumb. The click action is stiff, sometimes unresponsive and the fingers actually have to subtly grip the mouse every time you click. This has caused a lot of aching in my whole hand.The right click bar is too close to the ball and the fingers get in the way when I try and do a large, rapid movement with the ball. This causes awkward wrist movements, to realign my hand, when doing full range rolls. Then, when doing small, precise movements, the ball is sticky and stuttery and really difficult to attain accuracy.I really like the multiple programmable buttons and use them all. This almost make the mouse worth the trouble. AlmostAs for a user manual or helpful documents, there isn't any. I looked. In fact, if anybody can explain why the power switch has off/L/H I'd love to know! Also, there is a slide switch in front of the scroll wheel. I can't figure out what is does either.Just so you know, I'm pretty knowledgeable when it comes to computers. Hubby and I are in our 60's, been in computer centered jobs for decades. We know our way around most things computer. I'll probably have to replace this mouse with another thumb ball unit in the somewhat near future.....darn it. 2Its like a 1/4" (5mm) sliver about 2 in Let me start out by saying I will be returning this trackball, but with remorse.This is the closest thing to a Logitech Cordless Trackman, Elecom, you came really close to me giving up on my 8 year old Logitech which is on its last leg.Pros:1) Button Layout very similar (but not exact) to a Logitech Trackman.2) Very smooth scrolling of both the thumb scroll wheel and the trackball.3) Buttons feel solid4) Smaller than a Trackman (about the size of a mouse).Cons:1) Buttons feel odd. The click point is all the way up the side of the trackball, instead of at a similar point. The pivot is at the back of the button towards your palm, so you can only click up towards the front.2) Right click button is very odd. Its like a 1/4" (5mm) sliver about 2 in. long to the inside of where your ring finger would lay on the ball. Since you are using your index finger and middle finger to control the ball, you have to take your middle finger off to press it instead of like the trackman where you would press the button with your ring finger.3) Size: for those with larger hands this might be a problem. I have smaller hands and fits better than a Trackman.4) Scroll wheel location. I prefer to use my index finger for this. All mice that I have ever used this is located on top of the mouse. Perhaps I could get use to this, but it is very far behind where you would operate the left click making it feel un-natural.5) All of the other buttons are a little too far forward on the mouse. Those of us with small thumbs can't reach them comfortably. I have to lift my hand to move forward and press them. 3good, but 20% too small It's a really nice device, but only if you don't have large hands.The tracking is smooth and I really like the sensitivity. There are enough buttons and they're programmable (although you will need google translate to find the software to do it ;)). The main buttons also feel ok and so far the device feels nice and sturdyThings I don't like:- it's a bit too small, especially the ball should be bigger (it's the same size as most thumb trackballs)- the right button is in a weird place (inside the indentation for your ring finger would be more comfortable)- the scroll wheel requires too much force to tilt - when tilting it right I tend to lift the trackballBut, overall, it's quite good - and since it's the first ergonomic finger trackball in over a decade, I can't really complain.Were it about 20% bigger, I'd give it 5 stars. 4Finally!! <3 Years ago, I used the microsoft trackball that was similar to this one. When they discontinued that, I used the logitech version that was almost as good. I used those, buying a new one ever 12-18months because they didn't seem to last longer than that but it was the only trackball on the market even close to what I needed.When it was discontinued, I was in a panic. I couldn't afford to pay the $600 the few remaining go for. I tried every similar product I could get my hands on. My wrist can't take moving a standard mouse around, plus, once you've adjusted to a finger driven trackball, you can't help but realize how much less efficient it is & how much longer it takes to move your whole arm rather than flick your fingers across the ball.It seemed every other finger drive trackball out there was made for men with extremely large hands. Mind you, my hands aren't tiny. I'm 5'8 & I'd say my hands are probably slightly larger than the average American woman. However, the other finger driven trackballs I found were so large I couldn't reach all of the buttons at once (or even close) and they hurt my hand to use. Some of them I couldn't even rest my hand on without discomfort. I ordered & sent back almost half a dozen different trackballs.I decided I was beat and ordered the logitech thumb driven trackball & used that for a year. A long, miserable year. My thumb hurt, but worse, the thing was cumbersome to use. The accuracy was so horrible I probably shouldn't even refer to accuracy & that thing in the same sentence. Not logitech's fault entirely, its just the nature of thumb-driven trackballs. Its much easier to be precise with your pointer finger/middle finger than it is with your thumb. Moving across the screen was slow & plodding. With a finger drive trackball, my fingers dance on the ball, where one runs out of room the other takes over seamlessly. My thumb has no partner, and therefore I had to pick up & re-position my thumb to get all the way across the screen. Horrible.A former WoW addict & all around gamer, I had to quit playing any game that wasn't largely keyboard controlled (fewer of those around these days) because not only did I suddenly suck at it, it HURT. Even simple games, if they required lots of mouse work, I couldn't do it.My thumb was aching, so out frustration I was writing again on Logitech's forum, begging them to bring back my trackball or a re-imaged version thereof & came to Amazon to make sure I was getting the name of their old trackball right. Amazon, lovely, wonderful Amazon, suggested this trackball. Angels sang & I ordered it on the spot. I did a happy dance around my living room just to See a trackball of the type that I need.Sure, the ball could be a tiny bit larger or more exposed, but it doesn't have to be. Sure the directions aren't in English, but I've been able to plug & play without problems so far (windows 8).After a month or so of use, the only real annoyance I've had has been that if I'm not careful its easy to accidentally hit the button that sends me back a page on the net. No big deal & I'm sure if I tracked down the english version of the software I could remap the buttons & I probably will at some point.Its been reliable. Its been accurate. its easy to use. I can reach all the buttons (and enough buttons for proper gaming!!! Thank you!!! <3 <3 ) All in all I'm over the moon to have found this product. Ever so grateful to those who created it, and, Logitech (with their keyboards that keep quitting on me as their quality seems to go down) can bite me! 5Would have been 2/5 stars if Logitech Cordless Optical Trackman wasn't discontinued I really wanted this trackball to blow me away. It's getting an extra star on the merit of being the only trackball in its category with a scroll wheel. Elecom are heading in the right direction with it, but it needs work still.Pros:- It's not a thumb-trackball- It at least 2 extra buttons for navigation!- It has a scrollwheel! A rare sight indeed for non-thumb-trackballs.- It has real promise if Elecom decides to adjust its design.Cons:- The whole thing is way too small to be ergonomically comfortable, and I don't even have large hands.- The ball is simply too small, and a lot of precision is lost due to this- The ball's tracking is sometimes quite poor, the black shiny might be the cause of this. I've read this is a common problem with Elecom's trackballs, and I would recommend them switch to a flat black, maybe with polkadots or patterns, like Logitech's Marble or Microsoft's Explorer..- Despite ruby bearings, there is more friction when moving the ball around than any of the other trackballs I've tried which have plastic bearings.- Buttons: - Right click kind of baffles me? It's a thin button, not terribly comfortable, not the the worst, but I just don't see why it needs to be like that. - Left click is hard to press. It actuates the best at the very tip, but even there it's just not comfortable. Using the back button as left click (which you can remap with the provided software) is actually easier for me. - The fact that back/froward and the scroll wheel are placed farther away than the left click, makes it pretty uncomfortable for your thumb having to contort to be able to reach all of those things without adjusting your entire palm. The thumb area needs to be inline, and it needs to be where your thumb naturally lies, I shouldn't have to contort my thumb to reach a button. - Scroll wheel's tilt is completely useless, very difficult to press (and would be nearly useless if it wasn't, no one uses tilt features), and tilting up is actually impossible without lifting the mouse. - Scroll wheel's middle click is also pretty hard to click, very stiff button, in part having to do with:- Scroll wheel itself is too thin, feels cheap and flimsy, probably one of the worst scroll wheels I've ever used. It's also not a comfortable direction for your thumb to spin. Look to Logitech MX Master's thumb scroll wheel to see what a thumb scroll wheel should act like.- Thumb area in general is my biggest gripe with this mouse. It's just not very well thought out, and isn't comfortable, and causes fatigue from prolonged use. The thumb area should be tilted so gravity can help me do some of the work pressing buttons, instead I have to press sideways.- Not great for gaming, or really any prolonged clicking activity. I spent several in Adobe Illustrator, and had to occasionally reach for my Marble mouse because it was more comfortable for constant clicking and dragging I had to do. And Fallout 4, I once again had to switched to my Marble because DT2 lacked the precision needed.- Screws for opening the mouse are under the rubber pads, and the information sticker. 3The Best Finger Trackball Ever. If you ever owned and liked the old Microsoft Trackball Explorer, or the Logitech Cordless Optical Trackman, you will love the Elecom Trackball. This is the best trackball on the market that is still being made today. I was disappointed in Microsoft when they suddenly discontinued making the Trackball Explorer without notifying registered owners that they were going to quit production. The same thing happened with the Logitech Cordless Optical Trackman. If Microsoft or Logitech would have notified me that they planned on discontinuing their product, I would have gone out and bought at least two or three more units before the price skyrocketed up to $500.00+. One thing that I should mention is that the Elecom Trackball is smaller than either the Microsoft or Logitech models. This could be a problem if you have large hands. I actually found that the smaller size was more comfortable to use. If you find that this trackball slips around on your desk, then use a sticky, anti-slip pad that is sold for keeping cell phones from slipping around on the dash of cars. That will fix the problem. I bought the corded Elecom Trackball because I was concerned about how long the battery would last on the cordless model. The Logitech Cordless Optical Trackman had two AA batteries and would last several months before they went dead. The Elecom Cordless Trackball only has one AA battery. The instruction manual for the Elecom Trackball (which is written in only Japanese) states that cordless model (in low energy mode) has continuous operating time of about 125 hours; continuous standby time of about 694 days: and assumed available time of about 273 days. In High-speed mode, the cordless model has continuous operating time of about 76 hours; continuous standby time of 694 days; and assumed available time of about 173 days. If you buy the Elecom Trackball, be sure to download the driver which allows you to program all eight of the usable buttons. The driver program is available in English. You can find it here:[...]If you use a standard mouse, try the Elecom Trackball and you will never go back to a mouse again. 5Skeptical longtime trackball explorer is happy! This review is coming from a 16 year Microsoft Trackball Explorer user... I never thought that I would be able to find a replacement for my beloved old trackball. I took a chance on this Elecom unit and I am plesently surprised! The ball spins much more smoothly than my MTE, almost too smooth. I thought that I'd have issues with the right click button being in a different spot than what I'm used to and to be honest, its not bad at all. I can see myself adjusting to it easily. If I could find a fault, the body is a bit too small. It doesn't impact normal usage that bad but when it comes time to hit one of those small buttons with accuracy, the smallness gets felt for sure.If you are looking for a similar product to Microsofts trackball, try this one out. It is the closest thing to what many feel is the holy grail of trackballs. 5
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Reviews

Customer Reviews

I really wanted to love this product, but sadly, it is unusable. I wanted to love this product. I really, really, wanted to love this. I really needed to love this. But sadly, it is unusable.For the last 15 years I have been using a Microsoft Trackball Explorer, which is on its last legs. Unfortunately, it was discontinued nearly a decade ago. I was looking for a new trackball that can be operated with the middle/index fingers, has a scroll wheel and 5 or more easily accessible and customizeable buttons for my CAD program. The more buttons, the better. This seemed to be the perfect solution. Except, it isn't.Here are the problems:The trackball is too small. I have average size hands and my hand was cramping after a few hours of use.The ball itself is too small and can not be controlled precisely.The left-most button, which is default to left-click, is pretty much impossible to use. It can be actuated only when pressed all the way at its forward tip. But when you hold your hand that far forward, the wheel and the ball are too far back and impossible to use.The wheel button is too just too stiff to be usable.The tilt buttons on the wheel are also too stiff. The left tilt (down) button can be used if you are actuating the wheel with the tip of the thumb, but the right tilt (up) button can not be pressed.The right button is extremely awkward. The narrow button sitting up from the body is too tall to be actuated by a finger resting on the body and too narrow to rest the finger on it, not that it would be comfortable in that awkward position. A setup like they have on their thumb operated trackball (buttons flush with the body) wold have been significantly better and would provide one more button.The only way to use this trackball is to have your hand way back on the trackball, with your palm resting on the table and tips of the fingers at the ball. To make this work you will have to assign the left click function to the left back button (located above and to the rear of the tilt wheel) and abandon the the default left click button, the left forward button, the track wheel button and the track wheel tilt. But then you are left with a 5 button trackball with a very awkward right click button and a ball too small to be controlled accurately. That is what gets the two stars.I believe this product has great potential. By making the body a little bigger, moving a few things around, using less stiff switches and using a bigger ball, they can have a home run! 2Closest you can get to the great late MS Trackball Explorer but non-slip pads aren't really glued to the bottom Last update:There is no warranty or support available from Elecom in the US. Amazon gave up looking for any contact information, offered a return but I am keeping the mouse even if I will have to remove the rubber pads eventually and glue the damn thing to my desk.Update:Ordered another mouse, really nice, the wheel button not as rigid, but after 3 weeks one rubber pad has moved, and there are glue smudges all around it. I want to keep the mouse even if I have to remove or re-glue the pads. Trying to get manufacturer contact information from Amazon.Update 1.5 month later:The mouse refused to stay in place, so I ordered a no-slip dashboard silicone pad. The mouse still drifts, less than it does on the desk finish, but:The glue used on the 4 non-slip pads on the bottom of the mouse became soft, and the pads (3 out of 4) have moved from their places revealing almost liquid sticky glue. I don't know if the silicone pad has that effect, but glue is supposed to stay solid, otherwise it would be called molasses.Amazon graciously took it back, I ordered another one, if it happens again, I'm out.Original review:I love this little trackball. Now when my last two MS Trackball Explorers die, I won't be left in mouse limbo.I am not crazy about the shape and location of the right button, and the wheel button is way too hard to press, but with 10 customizable buttons and flying scroll (and I didn't even get to Profiles yet!) I can overlook that. Well done Elecom! 3A novel and intuitive approach to the index-driven trackball design So I know a lot of the reviews for this mouse mention poor quality control, and inconsistent performance: I found the build quality and performance actually exceeded my expectations. Granted I only purchased a solitary mouse, so it is possible I have a 'good' one...maybe they aren't all like this, but mine is stellar.I am the proud owner (and daily user) of what seems to have become the most coveted of all trackball input devices: the Microsoft Trackball Explorer 1.0 (commonly seen on Amazon selling for $695.00 NIB). I purchased the ELECOM Track ball mouse as a temporary stand-in, with the possibility of a permanent replacement. My MS Explorer is getting a very long in the tooth, and needs to be send out for a rebuild and bearing replacement (yes....this is a thing. There is an entire subculture around MS Trackball Explorer ownership).I choose the Elecom as a potential replacement/substitute primarily for it's form factor: while the track ball is much much smaller than the MS Explorer, the overall form factor of the chassis is along a similar ergonomic theme, unlike another pair of contenders by Kensington that I've already purchased, tried out and moved on from.The trackball is small, but moves extremely smoothly, requiring only a very light touch. The tracking seems very homogenous, with no discernible bias on the X/Y or anything like that. The buttons are mostly intuitive, but I find the the 'left click' button location takes a bit of getting used to (it's a middle finger affair).This mouse chassis does not "move": it might look like a typical laser mouse, but it's strictly an index-finger driven trackball design. I give this 5 stars, even though I do believe there is one area for improvement: a Bluetooth model. USB ports are few and far between on today's modern ultrabooks (my 15" Macbook Pro Retina only has 2), and using one for a mouse seems very....dated.So if you are looking for an accurate and ergonomic alternative to the giant-ball options from the other manufacturers...give this a try. It's not the cheapest item, but I found that for my purposes, it is worth every penny. 5Darn it. I was excited to get the ELECOM Wireless trackball mouse for the index finger. I have been looking for a viable solution to the Logitech Trackman for several years. I thought this was finally the answer.I use my computer day and night. I'm homebound, almost bedbound. My computer is my lifeline and is only not in use when I sleep. I read, do puzzles, cruise, shop...everything. All this is extremely mouse intensive. I also have a tendency for tendonitis and since opposable thumbs make us humans able to do many things, the loss of thumb use due to pain or injury is not a good thing. That said, I wanted something as smooth and gentle on my thumb as possible. This mouse isn't it.The scroll wheel and the left click are thumb controlled. This requires continuous, repetitive action on the big joint of the thumb. The click action is stiff, sometimes unresponsive and the fingers actually have to subtly grip the mouse every time you click. This has caused a lot of aching in my whole hand.The right click bar is too close to the ball and the fingers get in the way when I try and do a large, rapid movement with the ball. This causes awkward wrist movements, to realign my hand, when doing full range rolls. Then, when doing small, precise movements, the ball is sticky and stuttery and really difficult to attain accuracy.I really like the multiple programmable buttons and use them all. This almost make the mouse worth the trouble. AlmostAs for a user manual or helpful documents, there isn't any. I looked. In fact, if anybody can explain why the power switch has off/L/H I'd love to know! Also, there is a slide switch in front of the scroll wheel. I can't figure out what is does either.Just so you know, I'm pretty knowledgeable when it comes to computers. Hubby and I are in our 60's, been in computer centered jobs for decades. We know our way around most things computer. I'll probably have to replace this mouse with another thumb ball unit in the somewhat near future.....darn it. 2Its like a 1/4" (5mm) sliver about 2 in Let me start out by saying I will be returning this trackball, but with remorse.This is the closest thing to a Logitech Cordless Trackman, Elecom, you came really close to me giving up on my 8 year old Logitech which is on its last leg.Pros:1) Button Layout very similar (but not exact) to a Logitech Trackman.2) Very smooth scrolling of both the thumb scroll wheel and the trackball.3) Buttons feel solid4) Smaller than a Trackman (about the size of a mouse).Cons:1) Buttons feel odd. The click point is all the way up the side of the trackball, instead of at a similar point. The pivot is at the back of the button towards your palm, so you can only click up towards the front.2) Right click button is very odd. Its like a 1/4" (5mm) sliver about 2 in. long to the inside of where your ring finger would lay on the ball. Since you are using your index finger and middle finger to control the ball, you have to take your middle finger off to press it instead of like the trackman where you would press the button with your ring finger.3) Size: for those with larger hands this might be a problem. I have smaller hands and fits better than a Trackman.4) Scroll wheel location. I prefer to use my index finger for this. All mice that I have ever used this is located on top of the mouse. Perhaps I could get use to this, but it is very far behind where you would operate the left click making it feel un-natural.5) All of the other buttons are a little too far forward on the mouse. Those of us with small thumbs can't reach them comfortably. I have to lift my hand to move forward and press them. 3good, but 20% too small It's a really nice device, but only if you don't have large hands.The tracking is smooth and I really like the sensitivity. There are enough buttons and they're programmable (although you will need google translate to find the software to do it ;)). The main buttons also feel ok and so far the device feels nice and sturdyThings I don't like:- it's a bit too small, especially the ball should be bigger (it's the same size as most thumb trackballs)- the right button is in a weird place (inside the indentation for your ring finger would be more comfortable)- the scroll wheel requires too much force to tilt - when tilting it right I tend to lift the trackballBut, overall, it's quite good - and since it's the first ergonomic finger trackball in over a decade, I can't really complain.Were it about 20% bigger, I'd give it 5 stars. 4Finally!! <3 Years ago, I used the microsoft trackball that was similar to this one. When they discontinued that, I used the logitech version that was almost as good. I used those, buying a new one ever 12-18months because they didn't seem to last longer than that but it was the only trackball on the market even close to what I needed.When it was discontinued, I was in a panic. I couldn't afford to pay the $600 the few remaining go for. I tried every similar product I could get my hands on. My wrist can't take moving a standard mouse around, plus, once you've adjusted to a finger driven trackball, you can't help but realize how much less efficient it is & how much longer it takes to move your whole arm rather than flick your fingers across the ball.It seemed every other finger drive trackball out there was made for men with extremely large hands. Mind you, my hands aren't tiny. I'm 5'8 & I'd say my hands are probably slightly larger than the average American woman. However, the other finger driven trackballs I found were so large I couldn't reach all of the buttons at once (or even close) and they hurt my hand to use. Some of them I couldn't even rest my hand on without discomfort. I ordered & sent back almost half a dozen different trackballs.I decided I was beat and ordered the logitech thumb driven trackball & used that for a year. A long, miserable year. My thumb hurt, but worse, the thing was cumbersome to use. The accuracy was so horrible I probably shouldn't even refer to accuracy & that thing in the same sentence. Not logitech's fault entirely, its just the nature of thumb-driven trackballs. Its much easier to be precise with your pointer finger/middle finger than it is with your thumb. Moving across the screen was slow & plodding. With a finger drive trackball, my fingers dance on the ball, where one runs out of room the other takes over seamlessly. My thumb has no partner, and therefore I had to pick up & re-position my thumb to get all the way across the screen. Horrible.A former WoW addict & all around gamer, I had to quit playing any game that wasn't largely keyboard controlled (fewer of those around these days) because not only did I suddenly suck at it, it HURT. Even simple games, if they required lots of mouse work, I couldn't do it.My thumb was aching, so out frustration I was writing again on Logitech's forum, begging them to bring back my trackball or a re-imaged version thereof & came to Amazon to make sure I was getting the name of their old trackball right. Amazon, lovely, wonderful Amazon, suggested this trackball. Angels sang & I ordered it on the spot. I did a happy dance around my living room just to See a trackball of the type that I need.Sure, the ball could be a tiny bit larger or more exposed, but it doesn't have to be. Sure the directions aren't in English, but I've been able to plug & play without problems so far (windows 8).After a month or so of use, the only real annoyance I've had has been that if I'm not careful its easy to accidentally hit the button that sends me back a page on the net. No big deal & I'm sure if I tracked down the english version of the software I could remap the buttons & I probably will at some point.Its been reliable. Its been accurate. its easy to use. I can reach all the buttons (and enough buttons for proper gaming!!! Thank you!!! <3 <3 ) All in all I'm over the moon to have found this product. Ever so grateful to those who created it, and, Logitech (with their keyboards that keep quitting on me as their quality seems to go down) can bite me! 5Would have been 2/5 stars if Logitech Cordless Optical Trackman wasn't discontinued I really wanted this trackball to blow me away. It's getting an extra star on the merit of being the only trackball in its category with a scroll wheel. Elecom are heading in the right direction with it, but it needs work still.Pros:- It's not a thumb-trackball- It at least 2 extra buttons for navigation!- It has a scrollwheel! A rare sight indeed for non-thumb-trackballs.- It has real promise if Elecom decides to adjust its design.Cons:- The whole thing is way too small to be ergonomically comfortable, and I don't even have large hands.- The ball is simply too small, and a lot of precision is lost due to this- The ball's tracking is sometimes quite poor, the black shiny might be the cause of this. I've read this is a common problem with Elecom's trackballs, and I would recommend them switch to a flat black, maybe with polkadots or patterns, like Logitech's Marble or Microsoft's Explorer..- Despite ruby bearings, there is more friction when moving the ball around than any of the other trackballs I've tried which have plastic bearings.- Buttons: - Right click kind of baffles me? It's a thin button, not terribly comfortable, not the the worst, but I just don't see why it needs to be like that. - Left click is hard to press. It actuates the best at the very tip, but even there it's just not comfortable. Using the back button as left click (which you can remap with the provided software) is actually easier for me. - The fact that back/froward and the scroll wheel are placed farther away than the left click, makes it pretty uncomfortable for your thumb having to contort to be able to reach all of those things without adjusting your entire palm. The thumb area needs to be inline, and it needs to be where your thumb naturally lies, I shouldn't have to contort my thumb to reach a button. - Scroll wheel's tilt is completely useless, very difficult to press (and would be nearly useless if it wasn't, no one uses tilt features), and tilting up is actually impossible without lifting the mouse. - Scroll wheel's middle click is also pretty hard to click, very stiff button, in part having to do with:- Scroll wheel itself is too thin, feels cheap and flimsy, probably one of the worst scroll wheels I've ever used. It's also not a comfortable direction for your thumb to spin. Look to Logitech MX Master's thumb scroll wheel to see what a thumb scroll wheel should act like.- Thumb area in general is my biggest gripe with this mouse. It's just not very well thought out, and isn't comfortable, and causes fatigue from prolonged use. The thumb area should be tilted so gravity can help me do some of the work pressing buttons, instead I have to press sideways.- Not great for gaming, or really any prolonged clicking activity. I spent several in Adobe Illustrator, and had to occasionally reach for my Marble mouse because it was more comfortable for constant clicking and dragging I had to do. And Fallout 4, I once again had to switched to my Marble because DT2 lacked the precision needed.- Screws for opening the mouse are under the rubber pads, and the information sticker. 3The Best Finger Trackball Ever. If you ever owned and liked the old Microsoft Trackball Explorer, or the Logitech Cordless Optical Trackman, you will love the Elecom Trackball. This is the best trackball on the market that is still being made today. I was disappointed in Microsoft when they suddenly discontinued making the Trackball Explorer without notifying registered owners that they were going to quit production. The same thing happened with the Logitech Cordless Optical Trackman. If Microsoft or Logitech would have notified me that they planned on discontinuing their product, I would have gone out and bought at least two or three more units before the price skyrocketed up to $500.00+. One thing that I should mention is that the Elecom Trackball is smaller than either the Microsoft or Logitech models. This could be a problem if you have large hands. I actually found that the smaller size was more comfortable to use. If you find that this trackball slips around on your desk, then use a sticky, anti-slip pad that is sold for keeping cell phones from slipping around on the dash of cars. That will fix the problem. I bought the corded Elecom Trackball because I was concerned about how long the battery would last on the cordless model. The Logitech Cordless Optical Trackman had two AA batteries and would last several months before they went dead. The Elecom Cordless Trackball only has one AA battery. The instruction manual for the Elecom Trackball (which is written in only Japanese) states that cordless model (in low energy mode) has continuous operating time of about 125 hours; continuous standby time of about 694 days: and assumed available time of about 273 days. In High-speed mode, the cordless model has continuous operating time of about 76 hours; continuous standby time of 694 days; and assumed available time of about 173 days. If you buy the Elecom Trackball, be sure to download the driver which allows you to program all eight of the usable buttons. The driver program is available in English. You can find it here:[...]If you use a standard mouse, try the Elecom Trackball and you will never go back to a mouse again. 5Skeptical longtime trackball explorer is happy! This review is coming from a 16 year Microsoft Trackball Explorer user... I never thought that I would be able to find a replacement for my beloved old trackball. I took a chance on this Elecom unit and I am plesently surprised! The ball spins much more smoothly than my MTE, almost too smooth. I thought that I'd have issues with the right click button being in a different spot than what I'm used to and to be honest, its not bad at all. I can see myself adjusting to it easily. If I could find a fault, the body is a bit too small. It doesn't impact normal usage that bad but when it comes time to hit one of those small buttons with accuracy, the smallness gets felt for sure.If you are looking for a similar product to Microsofts trackball, try this one out. It is the closest thing to what many feel is the holy grail of trackballs. 5
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