• Zeikos ZE-UV55 55mm Multi-Coated UV Filter
  • Zeikos ZE-UV55 55mm Multi-Coated UV Filter
Zeikos ZE-UV55 55mm Multi-Coated UV Filter
Zeikos ZE-UV55 55mm Multi-Coated UV Filter

Zeikos ZE-UV55 55mm Multi-Coated UV Filter

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MRP: €34,80
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€58,00
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( 40% off )
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Expected Delivery: 21-28 days
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  • Elimination of the unwanted blue cast
  • Pictures gain brilliance
  • Ideal for photography in high altitudes, by the sea and in regions with very clean air
  • Essential filter for every outdoor photographer.
  • NOTICE: This set is compatible with all 55mm lenses, please verify your camera's lens thread size before ordering. Your camera's lens thread size will be marked somewhere on the lens barrel or printed underneath your lens cap. This number is always preceded by a "" (diameter) symbol.For example: 55 = 55mm lens thread size.

Customer Reviews

perfect uv filter fits 800mm lens wit hperfect pricewhen i buy new lens fro cannon t3i eos camera i always buy uv protecor filter for that to keep dust and prevent it from getting scratched up bestbuy does not sell 105mm i know i ask to find out & i only found two 105mm uv filter lens which fit my 800mm opteka telephoto lens this was cheapest price i went with i am very pleased i never heard of this company only rocketfish mostly but for company i never heard of or bought product from i am very pleased comes with case velcrow seal, pink cloth to clean lens of any dust, dirt or hair before it is placed on lens itself on box itself it says professional hd uv protector. to be honset i cant tell differnce between hd from mp3 to hd audio it sounds to me but taking pictures could make big differnce in detail with it attached to lens itself as long it prevents my lens from scatches, dust & dirt i almost dont care great price doesnt feel cheap at all i recomend this for big lens for your camera.for professional photgrpher they may have differnt company in mind to purchase an expensive uv filter of this of this size i wouldnt know i dont know what they reocmend or talked to any professional photogaphers to find out what they recomend to buy from as uv filters or any other filters for your camera lenses, or camera lens to buy5Low quality glass and coatings, but good enough for a backupThese Zeicos UV filters are inexpensive, but as far as I can tell, the coating on the front surface of the glass has little anti-reflective capability: hold it up to the light at a certain angle and you can see that it is only a little less reflective than a mirror. There is in fact some kind of coating as I have accidentally scratched mine with the edge of a lens cap. That said, the glass itself is reasonably flat, so there are no obvious distortions in the photos you take through it. The metal parts of this filter are also reasonably good quality. I have not had any problems with screwing one on to any of the Pentax, Sigma, Tamron, Vivitar, or Canon lenses I've owned, although occasionally I have had a sticky filter be very difficult to remove. Always keep in mind that all brands of filters use brass rings, not steel; brass is a much softer, more malleable metal than steel, so you don't ever want to use extreme force to remove any brand of filter. There are filter wrench kits available for just a few dollars, every photographer should have one. This is a typical kit of filter wrenches: Adorama Filter Wrench for 67mm-77mm Filters, Package of 2Uses for this filter:1. As a backup. I recommend you use a Hoya or B+W as your primary UV filter, but keep one of these Zeicos filters in your kit as an backup in case your good filter becomes lost or damaged. Why keep a backup? You don't EVER want to not have a filter over the front element of your camera lens, just to protect it from anything that might scratch or contaminate the coating.3Decent Filter But NOT MulticoatedMost people use UV filters largely for their protective quality. A filter - especially an inexpensive one like this Zeikos - is easily replaced if soiled or damaged, whereas the front element of a lens is not.But there is a downside to the use of a UV filter, and this is especially true when it is used on a zoom lens with many elements: That is that any refracted light, whether it be withing or outside of the image frame, will tend to create visual fog, lesson contrast, or in severe circumstances even create a light artifact in the image.The answer to this is for the filter to have coatings applied that prevent light hitting the surface of the filter from being scattered. In that case the light will pass through without adding or subtracting from the image except in the color range (In this case invisible UV)that the filter is designed to 'filter out.'"Multi-Coating" - the addition of several chemical layers - when well designed and applied, can be especially effective as each layer of coating can control the scattering of a separate part of the visual spectrum.Uncoated filters reflect the entire spectrum of light. Single-coated filters typically shows a blue or purplish reflection. True multi-coated filters show different reflection for each color targeted by an applied layer of coating.The Zeikos-UV filter only shows a slight bluish cast. This suggest a single coating of possibly limited effectiveness.In other ways, however, the Zeikos filter seems quite adequate. The filter ring is sturdy with a flat non-reflective coating. The glass appears to be of at least decent optical quality with no apparent lack of parallel surfaces.Thus in my final judgement this filter is a good value but not as good as its "Multi-Coated" in its name would suggest.3A practical nice filter with good quality.Zeikos markets inexpensive UV filters. However, the filters were made with good quality. My pictures taken with the UV filter does not have distortion and achromatic changes judged by naked eyes when compared with those taken without. The metal rim is made with good quality. The thread fits camera lens well. I compared this filter with more expensive ones and found little difference in my pictures. The difference is probably there, theoretically, if measured by instruments but I wouldn't be able to tell. Those more expensive UV filters supposedly cut down haze better but I did not bother to compare. My pictures taken with this UV filter do not have haze so why should I care.Highly recommended for 95% of photographers who can only tell the sutble quality difference by reading reviews, but not by eyes. The remaining 5% is the professionals or semi-professionals who, like music professionals, may tell one note played by pianist A slightly stronger than that played by B. For the true professionals, no one can recommend anything to them anyway. They have their own preference or brand loyalty. However. even among professionals, there are differences in opinion as which UV filter is the best. So you figure.I received my filter 2 days after I placed the order. It is amazing to see Amazon as a big company can continuously and persistently deliver the quality of service. I know this is not easy. It takes tons of time and energy.5Protects the monster lensesHad to get this for my monster 50-500 OS Sigma Big Bertha lens- won't use the lens without it as I'm constantly crashing htrough brush (and I made a terrible mistake and ruined a lens before by not having a UV protection filter- literally took chips out of the lens- thankfully it was a cheaper 18-135 IS kit lens- but still was mad at myself for not having bought a UV filter for it- I could still be using that lens today had I done so- instead I'm out around $400 or whatever that lens costs- Anyways- I put either UV filters OR circular polarizer filters on all my lenses now- and this 95mm one was the only one I found that I didn't have to take out a second mortgage to purchase- It might SLIGHTLY affect lens sharpness, but when you really think about it, our cameras today are so much better, sharper, crisper, faithful to color, that the little bit that this would affect the color or sharpness really doesn't matter much-5Okay for protection, bad for direct light reflections...These are well constructed filters, and screw on very nicely (snug and tight). I've had Canon lens filters and the filter lens simply popped out of the frame. However, they are no good when photographing a target and there is a light source head on or slightly off to the side (sun, lamp or chandelier). It produces quite the odd mirrored reflections, stars, flares etc. I bought 4 of these filters for my 4 lenses (all different sizes). In the evening, I simply aimed at the chandelier lights and the results produced a mirrored reflection of the individual chandelier bulbs. I then removed the lens filter and took the same shot, and the shot did not have any odd reflections or stars.I would suggest removing the lens filter when directly facing the sun or a bright light. I don't bother putting the lens filter on now as I handle my equipment quite carefully. I also have hoods which add some level of protection.3It did what it was designed to do. This ... It did what it was designed to do. This is neither positive nor negative, rather there was low expectation for it, and it fulfilled that low expectation. 3Ultra-budget and Certainly not "Multi-Coated"; but may work for someAs others have said, there's no coating on these filters, but what do you expect for the price? If you're just looking for the cheapest possible solution you probably won't find anything that costs less. However, this may impact your photography to some degree. It really comes down to a cost vs. benefit analysis for you and your photography; the answer won't be the same for everyone. I have a hard time rating this item for this reason, for someone who just wants cheap this is 5 stars.I used to use the cheapest UV filters I could find, since I mostly just use them as a protector (I have had several lenses saved by having a filter on the front now). However, since discovering the Sigma Multi-coated filter all of my Tiffens have been sitting in a drawer. The Tiffens create significant flare when used in a dark environment with strong point light sources in view; I've found it to be much less with the Sigmas. Sure, it's a fairly specific situation, but I like dark and moody photography. I also find that I encounter this situation frequently during travel to non-Western countries. It only takes ruining a couple photos from a place you'll likely never return to decide it's worth spending a few more bucks on a decent filter to help reduce this problem. Yes, you can just be aware of such situations and remove the filter - again, it's cost vs. benefit, for your situation. I feel it's worth it for me to spend a little more for lenses I've already spent a great deal on.2I know the package says it's multi-coated... ...but you sure can't tell by looking at it.The purpose of multi-coating is to reduce reflections from the surface of the glass. These filters appear to have the same reflectivity as a plain piece of glass. And, unlike every other multi-coated filter that I own, reflections from this Zeikos filter are untinted. As far as I know, that's pretty much impossible with a true multi-coated filter.My conclusion? Either the filters I received have serious manufacturing defects or somebody is shading the truth. Since other reviewers have commented about the lack of tinted reflections, I'm assuming it's the latter. Both filters (the 52 and 72mm) have been returned to Amazon for refund. 1Only for small aperture lenses/settings I don't like using unnecessary filters on my lenses (I have a B+W CPL as the only other filter I use), but I wanted to protect my 10-22mm without spending a ton. I wanted to give this multi coated filter a shot for its incredibly low price. After receiving this, I did a bunch of RAW tests with and without the filter in bright sunlight and with the bright sun in the pictures, and I could not see any perceptible difference between having the filter on or off. If anything, there was very minor improvement with the filter on (this was on a hazy evening and pixel peeping at 100%). There is no vignetting at 10mm. Excellent value.Update 10/31/2010:I tested this Zeikos on my large aperture Sigma 50mm f/1.4 @ f/1.4 with a light source in the picture frame and I found prominent halo and internal reflections with this filter on. My Hoya MRC filter showed no haze or internal reflections and was indistinguishable from no filter on. As a result, I have decided to downgrade my recommendation for this filter to average. This is not a filter to be used on large aperture lenses with significant light sources in the picture frame. 3I use it as a clear lens cap.When I bought this, I thought, "All I need is a round piece of glass. I'll just buy the cheapest one I can find. How could I go wrong?"I went wrong.This degrades lens performance by a lot. I noticed it right after taking it out of the package. It's very reflective, and there's even a tiny chip in the glass. There's also a spot where it looks like a piece of dust fell into the glass as it was cooling.I tested out the flare a little bit. I couldn't produce any flare with the lens alone (Rokinon 85mm f/1.4), but, with the filter, it was obnoxious.I use it as a clear lens cap, for times when I don't want my lens to get dirty but I still want to be able to quickly turn my camera on and take a photo. I try to avoid using it. A deep lens hood can protect the glass from quite a lot.I don't know much about the UV coats, but I know that high quality lenses are given countless micro-coatings and chemical treatments, so a filter is excessive. If all you want is something to protect your lens, I would recommend buying a more expensive filter. It may sound ridiculous, but it pains me to put this on a beautiful $700 lens.2Good not great, works better than Tiffen but not as good as Hoya.I've been using Zeikos filters for the last 3 years, they're cheap and perform ok. They're not as good as Hoya but far less expensive. As other reviewers have pointed out that they're probably not multi-coated but they work reasonably well unless there are many bright sources of light - then they create a reflection in the image.I have found these to work better than the Tiffen non-coated filters in the same price range. And I have to say, if this filter had not been on my camera it would have suffered from some heavy scratching on the lens as my teen once went for a hike and forgot to put the lens cap back on. It has also prevented breaking the lens more than once and I am grateful this filter was on the camera.If you can afford the Hoya, get it - especially for shooting in difficult lighting conditions like snow on a sunny day. For regular purposes this filter works fine and can be changed out without a worry if it gets scratched.4A filter if you need to protect your lensThis was the first filter I bought for my plain jane kit lenses. It's cheap and it works well to protect your lenses. However I agree that it appears to not be multi-coated and it is thick. My wide angle lens is the kit 18-55 Canon, and I put this on have never taken it off. However I also use other filters (neutral density, CPL, etc) and sometimes at 18mm you can see vignetting.So I've said multicoated, thick and vignetting. Why are these important?Multicoated lets in more light. When light hits the glass in your lens, some of it is reflected. Multicoated has less of that light that is reflected - but these filters cost a lot more. I do not notice a significant difference with my kit lens.Thick filters and vignetting are related. The idea is that your eye sees at 35mm, anything more than that is zoomed in and anything less than that is zoomed out. Well the camera sees through your lens, which is essentially a tunnel with some glass and an aperture. Normally you dont see the tunnel, but when you add on filters that tunnel becomes longer. Imagine if your lens was 10ft long - all you would see is that tunnel with a tiny dot of a picture. If you zoomed, the picture would get bigger and bigger and the tunnel smaller and smaller. Vignetting is the opposite of that, functionally it is stepping deeper in the tunnel. The result is a big picture and a little bit of that tunnel. What you see is an incomplete circle of that tunnel that is only on the edges of your picture. This can be solved by getting thinner filters, not zooming out all the way or cropping. Thin filters are expensive, so I stick to the other two.3
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Customer Reviews

perfect uv filter fits 800mm lens wit hperfect pricewhen i buy new lens fro cannon t3i eos camera i always buy uv protecor filter for that to keep dust and prevent it from getting scratched up bestbuy does not sell 105mm i know i ask to find out & i only found two 105mm uv filter lens which fit my 800mm opteka telephoto lens this was cheapest price i went with i am very pleased i never heard of this company only rocketfish mostly but for company i never heard of or bought product from i am very pleased comes with case velcrow seal, pink cloth to clean lens of any dust, dirt or hair before it is placed on lens itself on box itself it says professional hd uv protector. to be honset i cant tell differnce between hd from mp3 to hd audio it sounds to me but taking pictures could make big differnce in detail with it attached to lens itself as long it prevents my lens from scatches, dust & dirt i almost dont care great price doesnt feel cheap at all i recomend this for big lens for your camera.for professional photgrpher they may have differnt company in mind to purchase an expensive uv filter of this of this size i wouldnt know i dont know what they reocmend or talked to any professional photogaphers to find out what they recomend to buy from as uv filters or any other filters for your camera lenses, or camera lens to buy5Low quality glass and coatings, but good enough for a backupThese Zeicos UV filters are inexpensive, but as far as I can tell, the coating on the front surface of the glass has little anti-reflective capability: hold it up to the light at a certain angle and you can see that it is only a little less reflective than a mirror. There is in fact some kind of coating as I have accidentally scratched mine with the edge of a lens cap. That said, the glass itself is reasonably flat, so there are no obvious distortions in the photos you take through it. The metal parts of this filter are also reasonably good quality. I have not had any problems with screwing one on to any of the Pentax, Sigma, Tamron, Vivitar, or Canon lenses I've owned, although occasionally I have had a sticky filter be very difficult to remove. Always keep in mind that all brands of filters use brass rings, not steel; brass is a much softer, more malleable metal than steel, so you don't ever want to use extreme force to remove any brand of filter. There are filter wrench kits available for just a few dollars, every photographer should have one. This is a typical kit of filter wrenches: Adorama Filter Wrench for 67mm-77mm Filters, Package of 2Uses for this filter:1. As a backup. I recommend you use a Hoya or B+W as your primary UV filter, but keep one of these Zeicos filters in your kit as an backup in case your good filter becomes lost or damaged. Why keep a backup? You don't EVER want to not have a filter over the front element of your camera lens, just to protect it from anything that might scratch or contaminate the coating.3Decent Filter But NOT MulticoatedMost people use UV filters largely for their protective quality. A filter - especially an inexpensive one like this Zeikos - is easily replaced if soiled or damaged, whereas the front element of a lens is not.But there is a downside to the use of a UV filter, and this is especially true when it is used on a zoom lens with many elements: That is that any refracted light, whether it be withing or outside of the image frame, will tend to create visual fog, lesson contrast, or in severe circumstances even create a light artifact in the image.The answer to this is for the filter to have coatings applied that prevent light hitting the surface of the filter from being scattered. In that case the light will pass through without adding or subtracting from the image except in the color range (In this case invisible UV)that the filter is designed to 'filter out.'"Multi-Coating" - the addition of several chemical layers - when well designed and applied, can be especially effective as each layer of coating can control the scattering of a separate part of the visual spectrum.Uncoated filters reflect the entire spectrum of light. Single-coated filters typically shows a blue or purplish reflection. True multi-coated filters show different reflection for each color targeted by an applied layer of coating.The Zeikos-UV filter only shows a slight bluish cast. This suggest a single coating of possibly limited effectiveness.In other ways, however, the Zeikos filter seems quite adequate. The filter ring is sturdy with a flat non-reflective coating. The glass appears to be of at least decent optical quality with no apparent lack of parallel surfaces.Thus in my final judgement this filter is a good value but not as good as its "Multi-Coated" in its name would suggest.3A practical nice filter with good quality.Zeikos markets inexpensive UV filters. However, the filters were made with good quality. My pictures taken with the UV filter does not have distortion and achromatic changes judged by naked eyes when compared with those taken without. The metal rim is made with good quality. The thread fits camera lens well. I compared this filter with more expensive ones and found little difference in my pictures. The difference is probably there, theoretically, if measured by instruments but I wouldn't be able to tell. Those more expensive UV filters supposedly cut down haze better but I did not bother to compare. My pictures taken with this UV filter do not have haze so why should I care.Highly recommended for 95% of photographers who can only tell the sutble quality difference by reading reviews, but not by eyes. The remaining 5% is the professionals or semi-professionals who, like music professionals, may tell one note played by pianist A slightly stronger than that played by B. For the true professionals, no one can recommend anything to them anyway. They have their own preference or brand loyalty. However. even among professionals, there are differences in opinion as which UV filter is the best. So you figure.I received my filter 2 days after I placed the order. It is amazing to see Amazon as a big company can continuously and persistently deliver the quality of service. I know this is not easy. It takes tons of time and energy.5Protects the monster lensesHad to get this for my monster 50-500 OS Sigma Big Bertha lens- won't use the lens without it as I'm constantly crashing htrough brush (and I made a terrible mistake and ruined a lens before by not having a UV protection filter- literally took chips out of the lens- thankfully it was a cheaper 18-135 IS kit lens- but still was mad at myself for not having bought a UV filter for it- I could still be using that lens today had I done so- instead I'm out around $400 or whatever that lens costs- Anyways- I put either UV filters OR circular polarizer filters on all my lenses now- and this 95mm one was the only one I found that I didn't have to take out a second mortgage to purchase- It might SLIGHTLY affect lens sharpness, but when you really think about it, our cameras today are so much better, sharper, crisper, faithful to color, that the little bit that this would affect the color or sharpness really doesn't matter much-5Okay for protection, bad for direct light reflections...These are well constructed filters, and screw on very nicely (snug and tight). I've had Canon lens filters and the filter lens simply popped out of the frame. However, they are no good when photographing a target and there is a light source head on or slightly off to the side (sun, lamp or chandelier). It produces quite the odd mirrored reflections, stars, flares etc. I bought 4 of these filters for my 4 lenses (all different sizes). In the evening, I simply aimed at the chandelier lights and the results produced a mirrored reflection of the individual chandelier bulbs. I then removed the lens filter and took the same shot, and the shot did not have any odd reflections or stars.I would suggest removing the lens filter when directly facing the sun or a bright light. I don't bother putting the lens filter on now as I handle my equipment quite carefully. I also have hoods which add some level of protection.3It did what it was designed to do. This ... It did what it was designed to do. This is neither positive nor negative, rather there was low expectation for it, and it fulfilled that low expectation. 3Ultra-budget and Certainly not "Multi-Coated"; but may work for someAs others have said, there's no coating on these filters, but what do you expect for the price? If you're just looking for the cheapest possible solution you probably won't find anything that costs less. However, this may impact your photography to some degree. It really comes down to a cost vs. benefit analysis for you and your photography; the answer won't be the same for everyone. I have a hard time rating this item for this reason, for someone who just wants cheap this is 5 stars.I used to use the cheapest UV filters I could find, since I mostly just use them as a protector (I have had several lenses saved by having a filter on the front now). However, since discovering the Sigma Multi-coated filter all of my Tiffens have been sitting in a drawer. The Tiffens create significant flare when used in a dark environment with strong point light sources in view; I've found it to be much less with the Sigmas. Sure, it's a fairly specific situation, but I like dark and moody photography. I also find that I encounter this situation frequently during travel to non-Western countries. It only takes ruining a couple photos from a place you'll likely never return to decide it's worth spending a few more bucks on a decent filter to help reduce this problem. Yes, you can just be aware of such situations and remove the filter - again, it's cost vs. benefit, for your situation. I feel it's worth it for me to spend a little more for lenses I've already spent a great deal on.2I know the package says it's multi-coated... ...but you sure can't tell by looking at it.The purpose of multi-coating is to reduce reflections from the surface of the glass. These filters appear to have the same reflectivity as a plain piece of glass. And, unlike every other multi-coated filter that I own, reflections from this Zeikos filter are untinted. As far as I know, that's pretty much impossible with a true multi-coated filter.My conclusion? Either the filters I received have serious manufacturing defects or somebody is shading the truth. Since other reviewers have commented about the lack of tinted reflections, I'm assuming it's the latter. Both filters (the 52 and 72mm) have been returned to Amazon for refund. 1Only for small aperture lenses/settings I don't like using unnecessary filters on my lenses (I have a B+W CPL as the only other filter I use), but I wanted to protect my 10-22mm without spending a ton. I wanted to give this multi coated filter a shot for its incredibly low price. After receiving this, I did a bunch of RAW tests with and without the filter in bright sunlight and with the bright sun in the pictures, and I could not see any perceptible difference between having the filter on or off. If anything, there was very minor improvement with the filter on (this was on a hazy evening and pixel peeping at 100%). There is no vignetting at 10mm. Excellent value.Update 10/31/2010:I tested this Zeikos on my large aperture Sigma 50mm f/1.4 @ f/1.4 with a light source in the picture frame and I found prominent halo and internal reflections with this filter on. My Hoya MRC filter showed no haze or internal reflections and was indistinguishable from no filter on. As a result, I have decided to downgrade my recommendation for this filter to average. This is not a filter to be used on large aperture lenses with significant light sources in the picture frame. 3I use it as a clear lens cap.When I bought this, I thought, "All I need is a round piece of glass. I'll just buy the cheapest one I can find. How could I go wrong?"I went wrong.This degrades lens performance by a lot. I noticed it right after taking it out of the package. It's very reflective, and there's even a tiny chip in the glass. There's also a spot where it looks like a piece of dust fell into the glass as it was cooling.I tested out the flare a little bit. I couldn't produce any flare with the lens alone (Rokinon 85mm f/1.4), but, with the filter, it was obnoxious.I use it as a clear lens cap, for times when I don't want my lens to get dirty but I still want to be able to quickly turn my camera on and take a photo. I try to avoid using it. A deep lens hood can protect the glass from quite a lot.I don't know much about the UV coats, but I know that high quality lenses are given countless micro-coatings and chemical treatments, so a filter is excessive. If all you want is something to protect your lens, I would recommend buying a more expensive filter. It may sound ridiculous, but it pains me to put this on a beautiful $700 lens.2Good not great, works better than Tiffen but not as good as Hoya.I've been using Zeikos filters for the last 3 years, they're cheap and perform ok. They're not as good as Hoya but far less expensive. As other reviewers have pointed out that they're probably not multi-coated but they work reasonably well unless there are many bright sources of light - then they create a reflection in the image.I have found these to work better than the Tiffen non-coated filters in the same price range. And I have to say, if this filter had not been on my camera it would have suffered from some heavy scratching on the lens as my teen once went for a hike and forgot to put the lens cap back on. It has also prevented breaking the lens more than once and I am grateful this filter was on the camera.If you can afford the Hoya, get it - especially for shooting in difficult lighting conditions like snow on a sunny day. For regular purposes this filter works fine and can be changed out without a worry if it gets scratched.4A filter if you need to protect your lensThis was the first filter I bought for my plain jane kit lenses. It's cheap and it works well to protect your lenses. However I agree that it appears to not be multi-coated and it is thick. My wide angle lens is the kit 18-55 Canon, and I put this on have never taken it off. However I also use other filters (neutral density, CPL, etc) and sometimes at 18mm you can see vignetting.So I've said multicoated, thick and vignetting. Why are these important?Multicoated lets in more light. When light hits the glass in your lens, some of it is reflected. Multicoated has less of that light that is reflected - but these filters cost a lot more. I do not notice a significant difference with my kit lens.Thick filters and vignetting are related. The idea is that your eye sees at 35mm, anything more than that is zoomed in and anything less than that is zoomed out. Well the camera sees through your lens, which is essentially a tunnel with some glass and an aperture. Normally you dont see the tunnel, but when you add on filters that tunnel becomes longer. Imagine if your lens was 10ft long - all you would see is that tunnel with a tiny dot of a picture. If you zoomed, the picture would get bigger and bigger and the tunnel smaller and smaller. Vignetting is the opposite of that, functionally it is stepping deeper in the tunnel. The result is a big picture and a little bit of that tunnel. What you see is an incomplete circle of that tunnel that is only on the edges of your picture. This can be solved by getting thinner filters, not zooming out all the way or cropping. Thin filters are expensive, so I stick to the other two.3
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