• wolfcraft 4525404 Muilt-Angle Drill Guide Attachment with Chuck for 1/4" and 3/8" Drills
  • wolfcraft 4525404 Muilt-Angle Drill Guide Attachment with Chuck for 1/4" and 3/8" Drills
  • wolfcraft 4525404 Muilt-Angle Drill Guide Attachment with Chuck for 1/4" and 3/8" Drills
  • wolfcraft 4525404 Muilt-Angle Drill Guide Attachment with Chuck for 1/4" and 3/8" Drills
  • wolfcraft 4525404 Muilt-Angle Drill Guide Attachment with Chuck for 1/4" and 3/8" Drills
  • wolfcraft 4525404 Muilt-Angle Drill Guide Attachment with Chuck for 1/4" and 3/8" Drills
  • wolfcraft 4525404 Muilt-Angle Drill Guide Attachment with Chuck for 1/4" and 3/8" Drills
wolfcraft 4525404 Muilt-Angle Drill Guide Attachment with Chuck for 1/4" and 3/8" Drills
wolfcraft 4525404 Muilt-Angle Drill Guide Attachment with Chuck for 1/4" and 3/8" Drills
wolfcraft 4525404 Muilt-Angle Drill Guide Attachment with Chuck for 1/4" and 3/8" Drills
wolfcraft 4525404 Muilt-Angle Drill Guide Attachment with Chuck for 1/4" and 3/8" Drills
wolfcraft 4525404 Muilt-Angle Drill Guide Attachment with Chuck for 1/4" and 3/8" Drills
wolfcraft 4525404 Muilt-Angle Drill Guide Attachment with Chuck for 1/4" and 3/8" Drills
wolfcraft 4525404 Muilt-Angle Drill Guide Attachment with Chuck for 1/4" and 3/8" Drills

wolfcraft 4525404 Muilt-Angle Drill Guide Attachment with Chuck for 1/4" and 3/8" Drills

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MRP: €75,00
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€124,00
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  • Drill Guide that can be used in horizontal, vertical or angle positions
  • Guide-bars themselves have springs for a quick return when doing repetitive drilling
  • Drill adapter itself slides up and down on guide-bars
  • Angle positions can go up to 45 degrees, and rubber pads in the base hold the guide in place
  • Fits all 1/4-inch or 3/8-inch drills

Customer Reviews

Good idea, broke after short use I would've given this product a 5 star rating after drilling the first 11 holes with it. The holes were clean and precise which was important to me because I was assembling a rocking horse that was joined by nothing but dowels. In addition to drilling clean and precise holes, the assembly was easy to maneuver and get into position even on oddly shaped pieces of wood. The use of clamps was necessary and was expected.Then came the 12th hole. I reattached my drill and pulled the trigger and luckily I wasn't pressing the drill bit into the wood b/c there was so much wobble in the assembly it would've been impossible to drill even a sloppy hole and it would've ruined my piece. I assumed I had just not inserted the assembly into my drill appropriately or that the drill bit was in the chuck crooked. After checking these issues I realized that the drill guide had bent in between the drill bit and where I attach my drill. I have no idea how this happened, but needless to say the drill guide was useless to me from that point on.It is a great idea that is lacking in quality materials. I will keep my eyes out for an upgraded version as this product would be very useful for someone who doesn't have room for a floor mounted drill press.The only positive to come out of this situation is Amazon's customer service. They were prompt in responding to my inquiry and offered an exchange or refund. I chose the refund. Due to this service it may not be too much of a risk to order the product and hope you don't get a lemon. 14 3/4 stars - Good to Great and Pretty handy. For what it is, and for what it costs this is pretty good and nearly great. Here are a couple of setup suggestions that may mirror some other comments:* Always set up the drilling angle with a proper protractor of some sort - the indices on the base are pretty rough. If you require an exact 78.45 angle, you may be tinkering a bit, but once set it appears to hold pretty well.* There is a small hole in the guide transversal (that big metal web between the two posts that carries the drill chuck) - put a couple of drops of good lube in there (I used TriFlow, but any good oil will do).* When you assemble it the first time, leave the spring on the depth-stop side off completely. As other posters have noted the return spring pair is really stiff - unless you have a need for that, start with just one. You can always put it back. I found that, for my use, one spring going a full length of the shaft gives a nice return.* Put a dab of glue on the handle nut under the base - you know that's going to wander off someday.* I rubbed a little wax on the guide bars - made them operate more smoothly.* You may want to make a second foot for it - the metal one is designed to do everything, but it only has a couple of tiny rubber feet for friction, so you may need to bolster it a bit.This isn't a Bridgeport mill, but it doesn't cost like one (and you can carry it around). Pretty well made and works well for anything I'll be doing with it.My sole complaint is that it has a keyed chuck and you have to hang on to the key. If Wolfcraft offered a keyless chuck as an option, I'd have gotten that. You can get chucks and adapters for a few bucks so I may retrofit it if it's a problem. 5Lots of flaws, but basically got my task done better than without it. This drill guide did an OK job for me, barely. Yes it has some lamentable qualities (discussed later), but it was far better than no guide at all for the job I had. I had to drill two holes in a huge hardwood entry door for mounting screws for a lion's head doorknocker. One hole had to be perfectly perpendicular, the other at 5 degrees from perpendicular (due to shoddy casting and machine screw threading). No way I could do this by hand. This unit allowed me to do both very successfully. Now some comments. (1) It is laughable that the key provided does not mesh the chuck teeth properly so it is really not possible to tighten totally snugly (when you try it just skips out of the teeth). How can they provide a chuck with a mismatched key? Due to this I had to run the drill at high speed and drill slowly to avoid having the bit spin in the chuck. Was able to, but so cheesy. (2) I immediately removed the springs from the shafts. This allows the guide to slide very smoothly and avoids having to fight a spring while trying to drill. What on earth purpose is served by the springs? I don't need something pushing my drill away from my work. This removal also avoids the uneven forces caused by one spring shortened by the depth stop on one side. (3) Yes there is some "play" between the guide and the shafts, and in the chuck mounting, but I found this was not much of an issue. First it was not really that much play. Second, I used a pointed chisel to punch the center of the desired hole, and once the bit engaged in that depression any "play" became largely irrelevant and once the bit sunk 1/2" into the hole, it was totally irrelevant since the hole itself eliminated any play. (4) The detents that are provided to position the guide shafts at vertical or various angles and very poor quality. But having said that, they worked well enough. What I discovered is that although the stamped angle markings and the detents on the metal housing are at 15 degree intervals, the detents in the clamping sprockets (that mesh with the metal housing detents) are at 5 degree intervals. In other words, you move the clamp three clamp detents for every one of the metal detents. So moving one clamp detent gives you 5 degrees. So I was able to clamp the guides at exactly 5 degrees for my off-vertical hole. And that worked perfectly. But these clamps, so important for precision, are made out of cheap plastic and so the detents will undoubtedly quickly wear out, break, or get mushed.. Deplorable. (5) My door has crosshatches raised above the door panels so the little rubber foot pads on the base of this guide would not sit flat - one pad would be on a cross hatch, while another would be off it. But the rubber feet can be pulled out to provide a completely flat base which worked just fine. (6) Having a handle to hold this thing in place is crucial, and there is a handle. But this device ludicrously has the handle mount so close to the work surface you cannot actually get your hand around the handle except at the extreme end where you have far less control. (7) The shaft your drill engages (to turn the chuck) is smooth. All that would be needed is three (or 6) flat faces on this shaft to allow your drill to grip it without any possible slippage. Again, I had to drill at high speed and with little pressure to avoid slippage here. Just poor design again. As others have said I would gladly pay twice as much to have well-made drill guide tool and it amazes me that nobody out there seems to be making one (based on the reviews I read). But this did the trick for me (barely) and I am glad I got it. And it is cheap. 3Cheaply Made... So Use It Accordingly Know what you are buying and treat it accordingly. I bought this to make 1-1/8" holes through 2x10 hard maple boards for shelves that I was building.Assembly: Kind of a pain but not the worst. By the end of my sixth hole, I noticed quite a bit of wobble in the posts. Apparently hand tightening of the blue/green nut attached to the top of the posts is not enough torque. After tightening with a slip wrench (and slightly damaging the plastic nut) I didn't have any more wobble issues. In the future, I might add a little Locktite (Loctite Blue 242 Threadlocker 6-Milliliter Tube (209728)) to ensure the posts don't back off their screws during drilling.Alignment: Not the easiest. There is about 3/8" play (off-centerness) in this jig. To compensate, I would pull the bit forward and mark the wood with my drill bit's brad tip. Then I would push the bit away from me and make another mark on the wood. Then I would split the different and drill there. Without a brad tip drill bit, this would have been much more difficult. Trying to get a clamp on this wasn't the easiest either. On the next project, I will likely screw this into a strong, thin adapter plate so that I have something to clamp on. Notice that the jig does have four (4) screw holes.Chuck: It is just awful. Cheap metal and difficult to tighten. Twice, while cleaning out the hole at the end, I had the drill bit fall out of the chuck. I am certainly not weak, so when I say I tightened it... it was tight before drilling.Quality: Overall, not very good. It has survived thus far. However, cheap metal, plastic components, and a terrible chuck equal a tool that I do not expect to last. If anybody from Wolfcraft actually reads this, I would have paid $50 for this product if it was made of better material and you fix that truely terrible chuck. 3Like Back to the Future hover board - fantasy. Amazon should have a 0 star or a negative star. I spent many nights, just regretting buying this ***@!@*. The cost is half of buying a real deal from Wen drill press. This wobbles like an attachment for a vibrating cement mixer. It nearly sent me to the hospital because it CANNOT be stabilized. What's worse? There are several different brands of this engineering disaster out there. Why? Because no one puts realistic reviews. What credential do I have? I am not a carpenter, but being educated with the Imperial fractions that I have to use calculator to figure out the decimal places, I measured an accurate position for a right angled hole in a 4x4. it was a Disaster. I ended up drilling about 20 holes to my ruined 4x4 timber that required 8 precise holes. Why 20 holes? Because I wanted to see if any one of those 20 holes were actually a perpendicular hole. I think 1 was close to being perpendicular. So why am I so sour? Because, I spent 2 weeks trying to salvage a $40 dollar spent to see if I can jury-rig using attached metal plates to make it stable. I gave up.What actually works is (drum roll please...) from youtube: drill a whole bunch of thin equally spaced boards with the same bit size, line up those pieces using the drill bit and glue them together. This is now very right-angled, which can now be used as a template to make a more rigid drill guide- beautifully jury-rigged.Whereas, this Wolfcraft drill guide is a complete waste of money. Spend a little more and get a real Wen drill press. I wish I did. There are a few items that I abhor from online purchase. Unfortunately, this is one of them. I think I can sleep better now. 1Not a precision tool If your aim is to bore rough holes in 2x4s this guide will work just fine. If your work demands more precision I'm afraid that you'll want to look elsewhere. I recorded a quick video showing the runout in the shaft. Otherwise I was impressed with it given its cost. The crossbeam, base, and guide shafts are well-built and heavy. The plastic bits that provide the indexing angles are worrisome but I wasn't planning on using them on anything except 90.This was my second unit too so I held off on a negative review just in case I had a dud. 2Works great for what it's intended to do For those who are looking to easily drill 45-90 degree holes (regardless of if you are drilling on a wall, on the floor, or in the ceiling), this is great. For the money, it was exactly what I needed to drill a 1/4" hole into a solid core door. Yes, it has a key for the chuck (I know, when was the last time you used one of those); but that's really not a big deal, as you probably won't be continuously changing drill bits. Also, the depth stop has plastic threads (should have been a threaded brass insert into the plastic); but even tightening it finger tight, I haven't been able to either a) strip them, or b) have the depth stop slip.All, in all, this was a great buy.I'm curious to see how it handles forstner bits (next project). I'll report back. 5This is a good deal This inexpensive tool works perfectly for what I needed it for. I needed to enlarge the doorknob holes in some 76 year-old wooden doors, and by using this I didn't even have to remove the door and lay it flat to do so!! I love that. Helpful Hint: attach a scrap piece of 1/2" plywood that's a couple feet long to the tool first so you have plenty of room on each end to clamp it to the door. Cut the opening you'll need in your plywood. For obvious reasons, make it the same size as the opening in the tool, NOT the same size as the hole you'll want to drill in the door. I'm jus sayin.... 5You get what you pay for. it wobbles, so no precision whatsoever... I tried to do the holes for iron balusters at 40 degrees in a new handrail... but, it only helped as a guide, because the wobblling actually made a movement +/- 1/4" from where I wanted the hole in any direction.The key that comes with it to loosen/thingten bits doesn't even fit, so it's a pain to change bits.The holes in the base, helped to put some guides because the "self-centering" thing, only works when you're making 90 degrees holes... but once I put some nuts in there, it was very difficult to get them out.Overall: You get what you pay for... in my case, I needed to make holes at the same angle, and it worked (see pictures), but the "user experience" was awful. 1great for what it is look - this is not a drill press - and its 30+ bucks -and yes - tolerances of the slides are not exactly super tight - and the bushing of the chuck probably will wear out if useda lot - and handle of mine broke off when i tried to shift it a bit while i had it positioned with a middli torqued clampBUT - i had to drill 5/8 holes for bolting 4x4s together in place for a play structure - there is NO way this would have workedout freehand - this things was great - clamp it in place - drill ... and holes aligned great, were level - and bolt fit through perfectlymake sure you add a few drops of lubricant on bushing - teflon bike chain lube or similar works perfectly 5
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Reviews

Customer Reviews

Good idea, broke after short use I would've given this product a 5 star rating after drilling the first 11 holes with it. The holes were clean and precise which was important to me because I was assembling a rocking horse that was joined by nothing but dowels. In addition to drilling clean and precise holes, the assembly was easy to maneuver and get into position even on oddly shaped pieces of wood. The use of clamps was necessary and was expected.Then came the 12th hole. I reattached my drill and pulled the trigger and luckily I wasn't pressing the drill bit into the wood b/c there was so much wobble in the assembly it would've been impossible to drill even a sloppy hole and it would've ruined my piece. I assumed I had just not inserted the assembly into my drill appropriately or that the drill bit was in the chuck crooked. After checking these issues I realized that the drill guide had bent in between the drill bit and where I attach my drill. I have no idea how this happened, but needless to say the drill guide was useless to me from that point on.It is a great idea that is lacking in quality materials. I will keep my eyes out for an upgraded version as this product would be very useful for someone who doesn't have room for a floor mounted drill press.The only positive to come out of this situation is Amazon's customer service. They were prompt in responding to my inquiry and offered an exchange or refund. I chose the refund. Due to this service it may not be too much of a risk to order the product and hope you don't get a lemon. 14 3/4 stars - Good to Great and Pretty handy. For what it is, and for what it costs this is pretty good and nearly great. Here are a couple of setup suggestions that may mirror some other comments:* Always set up the drilling angle with a proper protractor of some sort - the indices on the base are pretty rough. If you require an exact 78.45 angle, you may be tinkering a bit, but once set it appears to hold pretty well.* There is a small hole in the guide transversal (that big metal web between the two posts that carries the drill chuck) - put a couple of drops of good lube in there (I used TriFlow, but any good oil will do).* When you assemble it the first time, leave the spring on the depth-stop side off completely. As other posters have noted the return spring pair is really stiff - unless you have a need for that, start with just one. You can always put it back. I found that, for my use, one spring going a full length of the shaft gives a nice return.* Put a dab of glue on the handle nut under the base - you know that's going to wander off someday.* I rubbed a little wax on the guide bars - made them operate more smoothly.* You may want to make a second foot for it - the metal one is designed to do everything, but it only has a couple of tiny rubber feet for friction, so you may need to bolster it a bit.This isn't a Bridgeport mill, but it doesn't cost like one (and you can carry it around). Pretty well made and works well for anything I'll be doing with it.My sole complaint is that it has a keyed chuck and you have to hang on to the key. If Wolfcraft offered a keyless chuck as an option, I'd have gotten that. You can get chucks and adapters for a few bucks so I may retrofit it if it's a problem. 5Lots of flaws, but basically got my task done better than without it. This drill guide did an OK job for me, barely. Yes it has some lamentable qualities (discussed later), but it was far better than no guide at all for the job I had. I had to drill two holes in a huge hardwood entry door for mounting screws for a lion's head doorknocker. One hole had to be perfectly perpendicular, the other at 5 degrees from perpendicular (due to shoddy casting and machine screw threading). No way I could do this by hand. This unit allowed me to do both very successfully. Now some comments. (1) It is laughable that the key provided does not mesh the chuck teeth properly so it is really not possible to tighten totally snugly (when you try it just skips out of the teeth). How can they provide a chuck with a mismatched key? Due to this I had to run the drill at high speed and drill slowly to avoid having the bit spin in the chuck. Was able to, but so cheesy. (2) I immediately removed the springs from the shafts. This allows the guide to slide very smoothly and avoids having to fight a spring while trying to drill. What on earth purpose is served by the springs? I don't need something pushing my drill away from my work. This removal also avoids the uneven forces caused by one spring shortened by the depth stop on one side. (3) Yes there is some "play" between the guide and the shafts, and in the chuck mounting, but I found this was not much of an issue. First it was not really that much play. Second, I used a pointed chisel to punch the center of the desired hole, and once the bit engaged in that depression any "play" became largely irrelevant and once the bit sunk 1/2" into the hole, it was totally irrelevant since the hole itself eliminated any play. (4) The detents that are provided to position the guide shafts at vertical or various angles and very poor quality. But having said that, they worked well enough. What I discovered is that although the stamped angle markings and the detents on the metal housing are at 15 degree intervals, the detents in the clamping sprockets (that mesh with the metal housing detents) are at 5 degree intervals. In other words, you move the clamp three clamp detents for every one of the metal detents. So moving one clamp detent gives you 5 degrees. So I was able to clamp the guides at exactly 5 degrees for my off-vertical hole. And that worked perfectly. But these clamps, so important for precision, are made out of cheap plastic and so the detents will undoubtedly quickly wear out, break, or get mushed.. Deplorable. (5) My door has crosshatches raised above the door panels so the little rubber foot pads on the base of this guide would not sit flat - one pad would be on a cross hatch, while another would be off it. But the rubber feet can be pulled out to provide a completely flat base which worked just fine. (6) Having a handle to hold this thing in place is crucial, and there is a handle. But this device ludicrously has the handle mount so close to the work surface you cannot actually get your hand around the handle except at the extreme end where you have far less control. (7) The shaft your drill engages (to turn the chuck) is smooth. All that would be needed is three (or 6) flat faces on this shaft to allow your drill to grip it without any possible slippage. Again, I had to drill at high speed and with little pressure to avoid slippage here. Just poor design again. As others have said I would gladly pay twice as much to have well-made drill guide tool and it amazes me that nobody out there seems to be making one (based on the reviews I read). But this did the trick for me (barely) and I am glad I got it. And it is cheap. 3Cheaply Made... So Use It Accordingly Know what you are buying and treat it accordingly. I bought this to make 1-1/8" holes through 2x10 hard maple boards for shelves that I was building.Assembly: Kind of a pain but not the worst. By the end of my sixth hole, I noticed quite a bit of wobble in the posts. Apparently hand tightening of the blue/green nut attached to the top of the posts is not enough torque. After tightening with a slip wrench (and slightly damaging the plastic nut) I didn't have any more wobble issues. In the future, I might add a little Locktite (Loctite Blue 242 Threadlocker 6-Milliliter Tube (209728)) to ensure the posts don't back off their screws during drilling.Alignment: Not the easiest. There is about 3/8" play (off-centerness) in this jig. To compensate, I would pull the bit forward and mark the wood with my drill bit's brad tip. Then I would push the bit away from me and make another mark on the wood. Then I would split the different and drill there. Without a brad tip drill bit, this would have been much more difficult. Trying to get a clamp on this wasn't the easiest either. On the next project, I will likely screw this into a strong, thin adapter plate so that I have something to clamp on. Notice that the jig does have four (4) screw holes.Chuck: It is just awful. Cheap metal and difficult to tighten. Twice, while cleaning out the hole at the end, I had the drill bit fall out of the chuck. I am certainly not weak, so when I say I tightened it... it was tight before drilling.Quality: Overall, not very good. It has survived thus far. However, cheap metal, plastic components, and a terrible chuck equal a tool that I do not expect to last. If anybody from Wolfcraft actually reads this, I would have paid $50 for this product if it was made of better material and you fix that truely terrible chuck. 3Like Back to the Future hover board - fantasy. Amazon should have a 0 star or a negative star. I spent many nights, just regretting buying this ***@!@*. The cost is half of buying a real deal from Wen drill press. This wobbles like an attachment for a vibrating cement mixer. It nearly sent me to the hospital because it CANNOT be stabilized. What's worse? There are several different brands of this engineering disaster out there. Why? Because no one puts realistic reviews. What credential do I have? I am not a carpenter, but being educated with the Imperial fractions that I have to use calculator to figure out the decimal places, I measured an accurate position for a right angled hole in a 4x4. it was a Disaster. I ended up drilling about 20 holes to my ruined 4x4 timber that required 8 precise holes. Why 20 holes? Because I wanted to see if any one of those 20 holes were actually a perpendicular hole. I think 1 was close to being perpendicular. So why am I so sour? Because, I spent 2 weeks trying to salvage a $40 dollar spent to see if I can jury-rig using attached metal plates to make it stable. I gave up.What actually works is (drum roll please...) from youtube: drill a whole bunch of thin equally spaced boards with the same bit size, line up those pieces using the drill bit and glue them together. This is now very right-angled, which can now be used as a template to make a more rigid drill guide- beautifully jury-rigged.Whereas, this Wolfcraft drill guide is a complete waste of money. Spend a little more and get a real Wen drill press. I wish I did. There are a few items that I abhor from online purchase. Unfortunately, this is one of them. I think I can sleep better now. 1Not a precision tool If your aim is to bore rough holes in 2x4s this guide will work just fine. If your work demands more precision I'm afraid that you'll want to look elsewhere. I recorded a quick video showing the runout in the shaft. Otherwise I was impressed with it given its cost. The crossbeam, base, and guide shafts are well-built and heavy. The plastic bits that provide the indexing angles are worrisome but I wasn't planning on using them on anything except 90.This was my second unit too so I held off on a negative review just in case I had a dud. 2Works great for what it's intended to do For those who are looking to easily drill 45-90 degree holes (regardless of if you are drilling on a wall, on the floor, or in the ceiling), this is great. For the money, it was exactly what I needed to drill a 1/4" hole into a solid core door. Yes, it has a key for the chuck (I know, when was the last time you used one of those); but that's really not a big deal, as you probably won't be continuously changing drill bits. Also, the depth stop has plastic threads (should have been a threaded brass insert into the plastic); but even tightening it finger tight, I haven't been able to either a) strip them, or b) have the depth stop slip.All, in all, this was a great buy.I'm curious to see how it handles forstner bits (next project). I'll report back. 5This is a good deal This inexpensive tool works perfectly for what I needed it for. I needed to enlarge the doorknob holes in some 76 year-old wooden doors, and by using this I didn't even have to remove the door and lay it flat to do so!! I love that. Helpful Hint: attach a scrap piece of 1/2" plywood that's a couple feet long to the tool first so you have plenty of room on each end to clamp it to the door. Cut the opening you'll need in your plywood. For obvious reasons, make it the same size as the opening in the tool, NOT the same size as the hole you'll want to drill in the door. I'm jus sayin.... 5You get what you pay for. it wobbles, so no precision whatsoever... I tried to do the holes for iron balusters at 40 degrees in a new handrail... but, it only helped as a guide, because the wobblling actually made a movement +/- 1/4" from where I wanted the hole in any direction.The key that comes with it to loosen/thingten bits doesn't even fit, so it's a pain to change bits.The holes in the base, helped to put some guides because the "self-centering" thing, only works when you're making 90 degrees holes... but once I put some nuts in there, it was very difficult to get them out.Overall: You get what you pay for... in my case, I needed to make holes at the same angle, and it worked (see pictures), but the "user experience" was awful. 1great for what it is look - this is not a drill press - and its 30+ bucks -and yes - tolerances of the slides are not exactly super tight - and the bushing of the chuck probably will wear out if useda lot - and handle of mine broke off when i tried to shift it a bit while i had it positioned with a middli torqued clampBUT - i had to drill 5/8 holes for bolting 4x4s together in place for a play structure - there is NO way this would have workedout freehand - this things was great - clamp it in place - drill ... and holes aligned great, were level - and bolt fit through perfectlymake sure you add a few drops of lubricant on bushing - teflon bike chain lube or similar works perfectly 5
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