• Wiebe Tech Programmable Mouse Jiggler Mj 3 (Single Unit)
Wiebe Tech Programmable Mouse Jiggler Mj 3 (Single Unit)

Wiebe Tech Programmable Mouse Jiggler Mj 3 (Single Unit)

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MRP: €56,00
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€92,00
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per 
( 39% off )
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Expected Delivery: 21-28 days
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  • Dimensions (WxDxH): 0.8 in x 0.6 in x 0.3 in
  • Features: LED indicator, programmable
  • System Requirements: Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Apple MacOS X 10.4.x or later, Microsoft Windows Server 2008, Microsoft Windows Server 2012, Microsoft Windows Vista / 7 / 8 / 8.1

Customer Reviews

Life changing! (In terms of productivity) This device, which could be called a programmable mouse and keyboard emulator or programmable keyboard/mouse playback device, has enhanced productivity significantly without loss of corporate security, due to judicious use of it in the context of the workplace. I offer below some supplemental information about this great product.First, many reviews have asked what is wrong with a downloadable software solution instead of this, in order to save money? Well if corporate policy allows that, there's nothing wrong with a software solution. This device happens to masquerade as a standard, HID-compliant USB mouse (and can function as a keyboard as well, see below for details.) It acts as and is seen as, and in fact is, an additional real mouse, nudging the mouse cursor every few seconds to every few minutes, depending on how you program it. I think the default makes it move 8 pixels to the left and then 8 pixels to the right every 60 seconds but you can program the MJ-3 model to vary those actions. So when corporate policy is poorly designed and out of touch with the needs of the corporate workers, a scenario that is unfortunately not uncommon in the least, one can use one's free will to exercise judicious use of workplace time, while not forgetting the security concerns that invoked that corporate policy in the first place - for instance, always log off when leaving the workstation (in Windows that can be quickly done with a windows key-L command.) Even if this pseudo mouse is connected and running for convenience reasons.A little about programming the device (this only applies to the MJ-3, of course. The MJ-1, with a larger handle, easier to grasp, is not programmable and is a great product as well. I will explain my preference on this below as well.)To download the programming application for the MJ-3 (programmable version of the Mouse Jiggler) go to www.cru-inc.com/mj3 (which is listed on the package when it arrives) and this requires admin privileges to install. However, you can install this at home and program the mouse at home and then take the newly programmed mouse to work and it works as instructed. The program gives you the ability to enter any instruction in programming mode, such as to flash the device s LED any number of times upon first plugging it in (to demonstrate that it s active), and then to move the mouse a specified number of pixels (up, down, left or right) and then wait ("delay") a certain number of seconds, up to 255 seconds per instruction. Or you can do other things like enter any keyboard character you want and then delay. At any point you can flash the LED a certain (any one of 3) colors a given number of times (solid, flashing or once), the purpose of which is to signal to the user that the mouse is active and "jiggling." You can save the programs you created on your hard drive and reload them to program other MJ-3s you've bought, and upload those instructions to the new mouse jigglers. Works like a charm! I like the MJ-3 better than the MJ-1 because it's smaller, doesn't protrude where it can be knocked off or bent if your knee bumps it (of course one could put that into the back of the computer without that risk.) Others who need to pull the thing out at the end of the workday may prefer the MJ-1 because it has a larger handle, easier to grasp when removing. (Another idea to solve that problem is to buy a USB hub with individual on/off switches for its attached devices, such as the Sabrent 4-Port USB 3.0 Hub with Individual Power Switches and LEDs (HB-UM43) or other similar device, which is currently $9.99 with Prime shipping. I will also mention below a programming idea below to solve the problem of yanking the device out of the computer daily to log off.) I also like the smaller jiggling that the programmable version allows - 8 pixels at a time, the default for both the MJ-1 and MJ-3, is a bit too much for the precision, graphics-intensive work I do at my workstation, so I set it to just move a pixel at a time every 255 seconds (looping in a 1 pixel square to complete the loop and then repeat) and it's imperceptible and yet keeps the workstation alive.Although one can use the device to enter text or simulate any key press, such as alt, shift or control, I do not recommend having it hit the control key because then if you hit "s" at the same time, for instance, it will save the file or program you're working on at the time, and of course other shift or control or alt combinations can have fairly major impacts. Such as rotating the angle of the screen that's displaying, etc. In some programs, particularly Unix/Linux based at the command line, control-c will cancel a running program or script, control-s will pause a running batch file in Windows, and control-q will resume its execution, etc. However, with a combination of mouse moves, mouse clicks and text available one could get pretty creative in a script that's running without one doing concurrent tasks - imagine the mouse going down to the Start button, clicking on it, moving a certain distance and clicking on a known program (or on a desktop icon representing a shortcut) and then entering a login username, password, or whatever, to activate a given program. Perhaps to check remote email on a Linux server, do a remote backup, etc.Of course, if security reasons make it appropriate, don't forget to "windows-L" to manually lock the workstation if you're getting up and leaving for long enough to make hijacking your computer a possibility. There are *some* reasons for locking the computer - it's just that IT policies don't usually read our minds to know the right time to lock them and end up removing our freedom of choice to do that ourselves. Stealing our rights to make valid judgments is never a reasonable idea unless we're total dolts and then why did they hire us in the first place? The only cheaper way to do this is to have a cheap, $10 watch with a moving second hand. Place it under an optical mouse when you leave the computer and when you return your workstation is still alive. However, I like the Mouse Jiggler device better because I don't need to grab the proverbial watch and balance it under the proverbial mouse - more automatic than that type of manually triggered system.Here's my programming solution to the "auto logoff" problem, and to the issue of getting questions from coworkers about having worked all night, as well as solving the problem of breaking the device by yanking it out of the workstation at the end of every workday. This solution would allow one to log off, say, at 5 PM and starting at 8 AM the Mouse Jiggler would be active again for another 9 hours, until 5 PM that same day. Or at whatever shift one is interested in maintaining.You can actually program it to stop moving the mouse (and thus allow auto-logoff) at the same time every day and turn itself on at another time, if you're willing to write a long program and start the jiggling at a certain time to make that work for you. You're allowed to enter any instruction in programming mode (go to www.cru-inc.com/mj3 to get the programming utility), such as move the mouse a specified number of pixels (up, down, left or right) and then wait ("delay") a certain number of seconds, up to 255 seconds per instruction. Or you can do other things like enter any keyboard character you want and then delay, or flash the LED a certain (any one of 3) colors a given number of times (solid, flashing or once.) So in order to make it dormant at 5 PM each day you'd set a starting time (upon which that 5 PM time depends), so let's say the jiggling starts at noon. Program it to move as you wish for a given number of times at the desired intervals until 5 PM - that's 18,000 seconds from noon. (Not as hard as it sounds because one can "copy" one action to another so that saves work.) 18,000 seconds is about 70 times 255 seconds so you'd copy the "255 seconds" command 70 times (or round it off to 240 seconds for 4 minutes even, to make it exact, so 75 instructions of 240 seconds each), and then do the same for no mouse actions (0 pixels in any direction you choose) in a similar way until 8 AM the next day, when you know you'll be logging in. (That's 225 instructions of 240 seconds each not to move the mouse at all.) And then 4 more hours (from 8 AM till noon, when the cycles starts over again, so 60 more instructions to jiggle similar to the noon to 5 PM routine) of mouse jiggling. Not all that much work - I'll bet one can do that programming work in 10-20 minutes, save it to the device and it will execute when you take it to work, and so if you plug it in precisely (in this example) at noon, it'll do that every day. The fact that it's jiggling during the daytime on weekends won't matter because by then it's logged off and jiggling the mouse won't log it back into the computer. If it somehow gets out of sync with the work day, just unplug it and plug it back in right at noon. Ditto for if your shift changes - plug it in 5 hours before end of shift, 4 hours after beginning of said shift for this particular example.I consider this product nearly as "life changing" as another favorite product for the modern computer user, the Realforce 87U Tenkeyless (White/Gray) keyboard, which is the Steinway piano of computer keyboards. Invest in yourself and your productivity and buy both products! 5Worth every penny at twice the price. I work nights and the HIPPA regulations require the computers to auto-logout after 2 minutes of inactivity (at least that's what our IT tells us...). Since I work alone, this has been the bane of my job. Literally the only annoying thing about my job was having to constantly log back in, over and over and over and... you get it. This little gimmick has made it so I have not had the urge to scream at my monitor like a madman or throw that damn thing across the lab even once, where it was an hour-by-hour event previously.Yes, IT will scream and pitch a fit if they find out. Idk, the absence of unbridled fury at something so trivial is and subsequent lack of blood pressure spikes is doing more to prevent a stroke than the small worry that someone from IT will walk into my department at 2 in the morning and look behind my particular tower and see that this tiny thing is any different from the wireless mouse receiver that this exactly resembles.I'm buying two more in case I lose this one. My only complaint: it is small, and unless you are leaving it in place (I don't) it takes dedication to keep from losing it. I've been lucky so far. 5Helps me get work done At my company they have some method of putting the computer to sleep after a certain amount of time that I haven't been able to figure out.The problem is when I'm writing files to a USB drive and the computer goes to sleep, access to the drive is shut off and the transfer becomes corrupted.Well, I need those files in order to do my work.So I got this device.It works perfectly out of the box. Every few minutes, it "moves the mouse" just a tiny bit, which keeps the computer awake if I have to walk away to do something else, and my file transfers complete.There's a free application you can use to make your own scripts, so if it doesn't "move the mouse" often enough or you need it to send keyboard keys, or make specific mouse movements or clicks, you can use the application to make up your own script and send it to the device, which saves the script.You do not need to have the application running for the script to work, so you can program the script on your personal computer, then transfer just the device to your work computer, eliminating the need to install the application on your work computer. 5Works My girlfriend works a media-intensive job where her boss is constantly watching their chat status. Anyone who goes "idle" too long gets a nastygram. Her job requires extended periods where she checks websites and content on mobile devices. So even though she's not at her desk, she's still doing her job! Enter... the mouse jiggler. I haven't broken down the exact behavior, because all I know is that I got tackled when I got home from work with a screaming cry of, "It works!".Plug-and-play under Windows 10, seems to update at least every minute which will be good for most, and doesn't move the mouse in a super-obvious way so it should be fairly safe to use even in an office. Detects as a generic input device, which is also safe in most offices.Now if she needs to spend half an hour troubleshooting why a video won't display right on iPhone when it looks fine on Android, she doesn't have to keep slapping her laptop every couple of minutes to keep her boss happy. This makes her happy, and it keeps her boss happy too. If you're in a situation like that, get one today. 5Unobtrusive lifesaver This is one of those things you shouldn't write about. I have the "slow" mouse jiggler. It works beautifully. About once every minute it sends a pulse causing the mouse to move, keeping the computer active. This is fine for Outlook. Aside from its use to counter surveillance of people at work, there are very legitimate uses for it. For example, my laptop gets bored when I'm watching a video and goes to black, requiring a login plus resizing the screen again. This solves the problem, though it tends to keep the timebar at the bottom of the screen up also. Another use is when moving a large file, doing a long install, doing a backup where you want to monitor the progress. Use it any time you want to keep the screen active while something is going on.It works on any computer - I use it on both Win7 and Ubuntu 14. It just plugs in and looks like a mouse.You can leave it in all the time. The twitch it gives the mouse is almost unnoticeable while using the real mouse normally.The only warning I would give is that if its use is critical, make sure it is working. When you plug it in, it glows yellow, red, yellow, green. Make sure it does all 4 or reinsert it. Also, again, if it is critical, plug it in and wait for a minute to watch for the twitch to make sure it happens. Mine has been very reliable, but there have been a couple of occasions where it has not "launched".This is a clever and excellent product. 4I was skeptical, but proved very wrong. I was skeptical, but proved very wrong. I was skeptical because my company has so many lockdowns on our devices and laptops, so I didn't think that I could just easily plug it in and it would work, but it did. It works perfectly, no more sleeping screens! The device does have some programming options, but I've found that is not necessary. Just simply plug it into an available USB port to prevent your screen/status from going inactive. The device also has a small LED light that blinks green occasionally to let you know that it's actively working. It will blink yellow if there are any issues. I did notice once when I rebooted that it came back on and it was flashing yellow, but I just unplugged the device and then put it back in, and it mediately went back to green status again. I've had no issue since then. This is the best $19 I've ever spent. 5Makes Long Presentations/Meetings Better My work PC does not allow users to change configuration settings... as a result my PC goes into power-saver mode after 6 minutes of inactivity. While I understand that's great for the company's electric bill, it's inconvenient when I have a long web-meeting or webinar presentation, and my screen keeps going black every 6 minutes, so I have to constantly jiggle the mouse or tap a key on the keyboard. Well, NOT ANYMORE! Just plug this into a USB port, and you are good to go. I can now watch a prolonged presentation without having the screen go black in the middle of an important demo. Definitely recommended for anyone in a similar situation. 5telework? get one! I love this thing. My Company computer settings allow for almost no idle time before logging you off, and alerting anyone who cares to look at your usage stats. I can walk away from my comp for hours and not have to log back on with this thing. You can work your mouse and keyboard like normal with this plugged in too, so you don't need to constantly think about plugging it in when you leave. Also, the small size makes it pretty discreet if you're not allowed to put USB sticks in your comp, and this comes up as a mouse in the dashboard--nothing wrong with using a mouse is there? 5Data on out of the box behavior - (without programming) The target customer for this device is someone whose machine is so corporately locked down that the programmable feature of this device is not an option. So what is the out-of-the-box behavior?I wrote a quick program that tracks mouse movement and plugged this device straight from its packaging. (Milliseconds are shown after the decimal place.)Current time: 21:04:20.226Current mouse loc: (490,177)Current time: 21:05:18.777Current mouse loc: (486,177)Current time: 21:06:17.367Current mouse loc: (487,177)Current time: 21:07:15.958Current mouse loc: (490,177)Current time: 21:08:14.611Current mouse loc: (485,177)Current time: 21:09:13.203Current mouse loc: (487,177)Current time: 21:10:11.793Current mouse loc: (489,177)Current time: 21:11:10.413Current mouse loc: (485,177)Current time: 21:12:9.74Current mouse loc: (486,177)So it looks like by default once a minute the cursor moves a random small distance from its current location horizontally. 5Must have if you work from home and the company tracks mouse movement If you work from home and your company monitors your mouse movement then this is a perfect solution. My company uses Office 365 with Skype and Skype displays "no activity" if the mouse is not moving. This happens after 5-10 minutes of no movement. 1st I downloaded a free mouse movement app but that moved the mouse and the moving arrow was irritating. Next I found this mouse jiggler on Amazon. Just plug it into the USB port and it is working. NO set required. Bought 2 for my son and myself. These work great. I have told many people about these. Many did not know such a thing existed. Only trouble I had was people skyping me when I was gone because it showed me available. :-) We started to remove the USB plug when we went to lunch. 5
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Customer Reviews

Life changing! (In terms of productivity) This device, which could be called a programmable mouse and keyboard emulator or programmable keyboard/mouse playback device, has enhanced productivity significantly without loss of corporate security, due to judicious use of it in the context of the workplace. I offer below some supplemental information about this great product.First, many reviews have asked what is wrong with a downloadable software solution instead of this, in order to save money? Well if corporate policy allows that, there's nothing wrong with a software solution. This device happens to masquerade as a standard, HID-compliant USB mouse (and can function as a keyboard as well, see below for details.) It acts as and is seen as, and in fact is, an additional real mouse, nudging the mouse cursor every few seconds to every few minutes, depending on how you program it. I think the default makes it move 8 pixels to the left and then 8 pixels to the right every 60 seconds but you can program the MJ-3 model to vary those actions. So when corporate policy is poorly designed and out of touch with the needs of the corporate workers, a scenario that is unfortunately not uncommon in the least, one can use one's free will to exercise judicious use of workplace time, while not forgetting the security concerns that invoked that corporate policy in the first place - for instance, always log off when leaving the workstation (in Windows that can be quickly done with a windows key-L command.) Even if this pseudo mouse is connected and running for convenience reasons.A little about programming the device (this only applies to the MJ-3, of course. The MJ-1, with a larger handle, easier to grasp, is not programmable and is a great product as well. I will explain my preference on this below as well.)To download the programming application for the MJ-3 (programmable version of the Mouse Jiggler) go to www.cru-inc.com/mj3 (which is listed on the package when it arrives) and this requires admin privileges to install. However, you can install this at home and program the mouse at home and then take the newly programmed mouse to work and it works as instructed. The program gives you the ability to enter any instruction in programming mode, such as to flash the device s LED any number of times upon first plugging it in (to demonstrate that it s active), and then to move the mouse a specified number of pixels (up, down, left or right) and then wait ("delay") a certain number of seconds, up to 255 seconds per instruction. Or you can do other things like enter any keyboard character you want and then delay. At any point you can flash the LED a certain (any one of 3) colors a given number of times (solid, flashing or once), the purpose of which is to signal to the user that the mouse is active and "jiggling." You can save the programs you created on your hard drive and reload them to program other MJ-3s you've bought, and upload those instructions to the new mouse jigglers. Works like a charm! I like the MJ-3 better than the MJ-1 because it's smaller, doesn't protrude where it can be knocked off or bent if your knee bumps it (of course one could put that into the back of the computer without that risk.) Others who need to pull the thing out at the end of the workday may prefer the MJ-1 because it has a larger handle, easier to grasp when removing. (Another idea to solve that problem is to buy a USB hub with individual on/off switches for its attached devices, such as the Sabrent 4-Port USB 3.0 Hub with Individual Power Switches and LEDs (HB-UM43) or other similar device, which is currently $9.99 with Prime shipping. I will also mention below a programming idea below to solve the problem of yanking the device out of the computer daily to log off.) I also like the smaller jiggling that the programmable version allows - 8 pixels at a time, the default for both the MJ-1 and MJ-3, is a bit too much for the precision, graphics-intensive work I do at my workstation, so I set it to just move a pixel at a time every 255 seconds (looping in a 1 pixel square to complete the loop and then repeat) and it's imperceptible and yet keeps the workstation alive.Although one can use the device to enter text or simulate any key press, such as alt, shift or control, I do not recommend having it hit the control key because then if you hit "s" at the same time, for instance, it will save the file or program you're working on at the time, and of course other shift or control or alt combinations can have fairly major impacts. Such as rotating the angle of the screen that's displaying, etc. In some programs, particularly Unix/Linux based at the command line, control-c will cancel a running program or script, control-s will pause a running batch file in Windows, and control-q will resume its execution, etc. However, with a combination of mouse moves, mouse clicks and text available one could get pretty creative in a script that's running without one doing concurrent tasks - imagine the mouse going down to the Start button, clicking on it, moving a certain distance and clicking on a known program (or on a desktop icon representing a shortcut) and then entering a login username, password, or whatever, to activate a given program. Perhaps to check remote email on a Linux server, do a remote backup, etc.Of course, if security reasons make it appropriate, don't forget to "windows-L" to manually lock the workstation if you're getting up and leaving for long enough to make hijacking your computer a possibility. There are *some* reasons for locking the computer - it's just that IT policies don't usually read our minds to know the right time to lock them and end up removing our freedom of choice to do that ourselves. Stealing our rights to make valid judgments is never a reasonable idea unless we're total dolts and then why did they hire us in the first place? The only cheaper way to do this is to have a cheap, $10 watch with a moving second hand. Place it under an optical mouse when you leave the computer and when you return your workstation is still alive. However, I like the Mouse Jiggler device better because I don't need to grab the proverbial watch and balance it under the proverbial mouse - more automatic than that type of manually triggered system.Here's my programming solution to the "auto logoff" problem, and to the issue of getting questions from coworkers about having worked all night, as well as solving the problem of breaking the device by yanking it out of the workstation at the end of every workday. This solution would allow one to log off, say, at 5 PM and starting at 8 AM the Mouse Jiggler would be active again for another 9 hours, until 5 PM that same day. Or at whatever shift one is interested in maintaining.You can actually program it to stop moving the mouse (and thus allow auto-logoff) at the same time every day and turn itself on at another time, if you're willing to write a long program and start the jiggling at a certain time to make that work for you. You're allowed to enter any instruction in programming mode (go to www.cru-inc.com/mj3 to get the programming utility), such as move the mouse a specified number of pixels (up, down, left or right) and then wait ("delay") a certain number of seconds, up to 255 seconds per instruction. Or you can do other things like enter any keyboard character you want and then delay, or flash the LED a certain (any one of 3) colors a given number of times (solid, flashing or once.) So in order to make it dormant at 5 PM each day you'd set a starting time (upon which that 5 PM time depends), so let's say the jiggling starts at noon. Program it to move as you wish for a given number of times at the desired intervals until 5 PM - that's 18,000 seconds from noon. (Not as hard as it sounds because one can "copy" one action to another so that saves work.) 18,000 seconds is about 70 times 255 seconds so you'd copy the "255 seconds" command 70 times (or round it off to 240 seconds for 4 minutes even, to make it exact, so 75 instructions of 240 seconds each), and then do the same for no mouse actions (0 pixels in any direction you choose) in a similar way until 8 AM the next day, when you know you'll be logging in. (That's 225 instructions of 240 seconds each not to move the mouse at all.) And then 4 more hours (from 8 AM till noon, when the cycles starts over again, so 60 more instructions to jiggle similar to the noon to 5 PM routine) of mouse jiggling. Not all that much work - I'll bet one can do that programming work in 10-20 minutes, save it to the device and it will execute when you take it to work, and so if you plug it in precisely (in this example) at noon, it'll do that every day. The fact that it's jiggling during the daytime on weekends won't matter because by then it's logged off and jiggling the mouse won't log it back into the computer. If it somehow gets out of sync with the work day, just unplug it and plug it back in right at noon. Ditto for if your shift changes - plug it in 5 hours before end of shift, 4 hours after beginning of said shift for this particular example.I consider this product nearly as "life changing" as another favorite product for the modern computer user, the Realforce 87U Tenkeyless (White/Gray) keyboard, which is the Steinway piano of computer keyboards. Invest in yourself and your productivity and buy both products! 5Worth every penny at twice the price. I work nights and the HIPPA regulations require the computers to auto-logout after 2 minutes of inactivity (at least that's what our IT tells us...). Since I work alone, this has been the bane of my job. Literally the only annoying thing about my job was having to constantly log back in, over and over and over and... you get it. This little gimmick has made it so I have not had the urge to scream at my monitor like a madman or throw that damn thing across the lab even once, where it was an hour-by-hour event previously.Yes, IT will scream and pitch a fit if they find out. Idk, the absence of unbridled fury at something so trivial is and subsequent lack of blood pressure spikes is doing more to prevent a stroke than the small worry that someone from IT will walk into my department at 2 in the morning and look behind my particular tower and see that this tiny thing is any different from the wireless mouse receiver that this exactly resembles.I'm buying two more in case I lose this one. My only complaint: it is small, and unless you are leaving it in place (I don't) it takes dedication to keep from losing it. I've been lucky so far. 5Helps me get work done At my company they have some method of putting the computer to sleep after a certain amount of time that I haven't been able to figure out.The problem is when I'm writing files to a USB drive and the computer goes to sleep, access to the drive is shut off and the transfer becomes corrupted.Well, I need those files in order to do my work.So I got this device.It works perfectly out of the box. Every few minutes, it "moves the mouse" just a tiny bit, which keeps the computer awake if I have to walk away to do something else, and my file transfers complete.There's a free application you can use to make your own scripts, so if it doesn't "move the mouse" often enough or you need it to send keyboard keys, or make specific mouse movements or clicks, you can use the application to make up your own script and send it to the device, which saves the script.You do not need to have the application running for the script to work, so you can program the script on your personal computer, then transfer just the device to your work computer, eliminating the need to install the application on your work computer. 5Works My girlfriend works a media-intensive job where her boss is constantly watching their chat status. Anyone who goes "idle" too long gets a nastygram. Her job requires extended periods where she checks websites and content on mobile devices. So even though she's not at her desk, she's still doing her job! Enter... the mouse jiggler. I haven't broken down the exact behavior, because all I know is that I got tackled when I got home from work with a screaming cry of, "It works!".Plug-and-play under Windows 10, seems to update at least every minute which will be good for most, and doesn't move the mouse in a super-obvious way so it should be fairly safe to use even in an office. Detects as a generic input device, which is also safe in most offices.Now if she needs to spend half an hour troubleshooting why a video won't display right on iPhone when it looks fine on Android, she doesn't have to keep slapping her laptop every couple of minutes to keep her boss happy. This makes her happy, and it keeps her boss happy too. If you're in a situation like that, get one today. 5Unobtrusive lifesaver This is one of those things you shouldn't write about. I have the "slow" mouse jiggler. It works beautifully. About once every minute it sends a pulse causing the mouse to move, keeping the computer active. This is fine for Outlook. Aside from its use to counter surveillance of people at work, there are very legitimate uses for it. For example, my laptop gets bored when I'm watching a video and goes to black, requiring a login plus resizing the screen again. This solves the problem, though it tends to keep the timebar at the bottom of the screen up also. Another use is when moving a large file, doing a long install, doing a backup where you want to monitor the progress. Use it any time you want to keep the screen active while something is going on.It works on any computer - I use it on both Win7 and Ubuntu 14. It just plugs in and looks like a mouse.You can leave it in all the time. The twitch it gives the mouse is almost unnoticeable while using the real mouse normally.The only warning I would give is that if its use is critical, make sure it is working. When you plug it in, it glows yellow, red, yellow, green. Make sure it does all 4 or reinsert it. Also, again, if it is critical, plug it in and wait for a minute to watch for the twitch to make sure it happens. Mine has been very reliable, but there have been a couple of occasions where it has not "launched".This is a clever and excellent product. 4I was skeptical, but proved very wrong. I was skeptical, but proved very wrong. I was skeptical because my company has so many lockdowns on our devices and laptops, so I didn't think that I could just easily plug it in and it would work, but it did. It works perfectly, no more sleeping screens! The device does have some programming options, but I've found that is not necessary. Just simply plug it into an available USB port to prevent your screen/status from going inactive. The device also has a small LED light that blinks green occasionally to let you know that it's actively working. It will blink yellow if there are any issues. I did notice once when I rebooted that it came back on and it was flashing yellow, but I just unplugged the device and then put it back in, and it mediately went back to green status again. I've had no issue since then. This is the best $19 I've ever spent. 5Makes Long Presentations/Meetings Better My work PC does not allow users to change configuration settings... as a result my PC goes into power-saver mode after 6 minutes of inactivity. While I understand that's great for the company's electric bill, it's inconvenient when I have a long web-meeting or webinar presentation, and my screen keeps going black every 6 minutes, so I have to constantly jiggle the mouse or tap a key on the keyboard. Well, NOT ANYMORE! Just plug this into a USB port, and you are good to go. I can now watch a prolonged presentation without having the screen go black in the middle of an important demo. Definitely recommended for anyone in a similar situation. 5telework? get one! I love this thing. My Company computer settings allow for almost no idle time before logging you off, and alerting anyone who cares to look at your usage stats. I can walk away from my comp for hours and not have to log back on with this thing. You can work your mouse and keyboard like normal with this plugged in too, so you don't need to constantly think about plugging it in when you leave. Also, the small size makes it pretty discreet if you're not allowed to put USB sticks in your comp, and this comes up as a mouse in the dashboard--nothing wrong with using a mouse is there? 5Data on out of the box behavior - (without programming) The target customer for this device is someone whose machine is so corporately locked down that the programmable feature of this device is not an option. So what is the out-of-the-box behavior?I wrote a quick program that tracks mouse movement and plugged this device straight from its packaging. (Milliseconds are shown after the decimal place.)Current time: 21:04:20.226Current mouse loc: (490,177)Current time: 21:05:18.777Current mouse loc: (486,177)Current time: 21:06:17.367Current mouse loc: (487,177)Current time: 21:07:15.958Current mouse loc: (490,177)Current time: 21:08:14.611Current mouse loc: (485,177)Current time: 21:09:13.203Current mouse loc: (487,177)Current time: 21:10:11.793Current mouse loc: (489,177)Current time: 21:11:10.413Current mouse loc: (485,177)Current time: 21:12:9.74Current mouse loc: (486,177)So it looks like by default once a minute the cursor moves a random small distance from its current location horizontally. 5Must have if you work from home and the company tracks mouse movement If you work from home and your company monitors your mouse movement then this is a perfect solution. My company uses Office 365 with Skype and Skype displays "no activity" if the mouse is not moving. This happens after 5-10 minutes of no movement. 1st I downloaded a free mouse movement app but that moved the mouse and the moving arrow was irritating. Next I found this mouse jiggler on Amazon. Just plug it into the USB port and it is working. NO set required. Bought 2 for my son and myself. These work great. I have told many people about these. Many did not know such a thing existed. Only trouble I had was people skyping me when I was gone because it showed me available. :-) We started to remove the USB plug when we went to lunch. 5
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