• SONOS BRIDGE for Sonos Wireless Network (Discontinued by Manufacturer)
  • SONOS BRIDGE for Sonos Wireless Network (Discontinued by Manufacturer)
  • SONOS BRIDGE for Sonos Wireless Network (Discontinued by Manufacturer)
  • SONOS BRIDGE for Sonos Wireless Network (Discontinued by Manufacturer)
  • SONOS BRIDGE for Sonos Wireless Network (Discontinued by Manufacturer)
SONOS BRIDGE for Sonos Wireless Network (Discontinued by Manufacturer)
SONOS BRIDGE for Sonos Wireless Network (Discontinued by Manufacturer)
SONOS BRIDGE for Sonos Wireless Network (Discontinued by Manufacturer)
SONOS BRIDGE for Sonos Wireless Network (Discontinued by Manufacturer)
SONOS BRIDGE for Sonos Wireless Network (Discontinued by Manufacturer)

SONOS BRIDGE for Sonos Wireless Network (Discontinued by Manufacturer)

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  • NOT A CONNECT THIS IS A BRIDGE SEE DESCRIPTION FOR DIFFERENCES
  • Not required to set up your Sonos wireless speaker
  • Provides a solution for homes where Wi-Fi doesn't reach all rooms
  • Plugs into your Wi-Fi router to create a dedicated wireless network for your Sonos system

Customer Reviews

Connect your speaker over wifi. Great investment Finally after months of debating I finally bought my first Sonos Speaker and know I'm going to by more so buying the bridge was a great cheap investment to make my experience better and seamless. Right now Sonos made the bridge optional but I saw if your planning to get the 3.1 or 5.1 surround sound so it worth getting. What the Bridge does since it connected to your router is makes your Sonos system it's own network so it doesn't interfere with your extorting wifi. But now I guess you can get the connect but that only to boost your wifi signal. 5Nice sound, but directions and app need work Recently I decided to upgrade my home sound system and decided to start with a SONOS Play:1 and a Bridge; the price looked about right and the thoughts of not having to have wires all over the places while having my place with music as I wanted it was appealing so I decided to start small and see what it was like. Opening the boxes (I picked up a bridge at the same time, this review is about my total experience) I have to say that SONOS did a quality job packing thing. Configuration seemed simple, plug in, download, and begin configuring; this is where the train starts coming off the track somewhat. The unpacking and plug in was simple enough (bridge to router, Play:1 and bridge into an outlet), the trouble started when I started configuring things. I went through SONOS s directions (select the component, push the button when the application tells you, continue on) and thought everything was working great; and it did for a little while. Actually the first round of music went smoothly and when I went to listen to some more my music cut out or skipped a little (or a lot). It seems that sometimes my Play:1 would cut out of the connection for no reason (the bridge was always there). Researching online I learned that the frequency used for out of the box by SONOS is near that of some wireless home phones and what needed to occur was to change the channel used, but to do that you needed to have the Play:1 and the bridge up at the same time good thing they provided the means for a direct connection. After doing the direct connection and changing the channel I was able to get wireless sound in my place (it was a near run to me returning the system).Rating wise the sound is a solid 5 but I have to rate the system a 4 because SONOS failed to make it an easy set-up. By providing a simple sheet with common setup or connection problems I d have given this a 5 star rating but don t feel I can because of the pain, need to learn, and almost reaching the point of returning the product. (Note: on the SONOS website under FAQs they mention that SONOS uses 2.4 Ghz, the same as some phones). 4Very Satisfied Long-Term Users We ve been satisfied users of SONOS system now for more than five years, using it almost daily with no problems with any component. I purchased it after a long search of alternative wireless ways to play my digital music collection through the house. About six years ago I converted and transferred my collection of over 5,000 CD s to FLAC files stored on my desk top PC, but now we mostly stream our music from Amazon Music, and before that from Pandora.This SONOS system can seem a little complicated at first, trying to figure ou what components are needed. We have four component pieces that play music in three different rooms of our house, and each room could be playing different music, although we never use that feature.Connected to our desktop PC is a ZoneBridge BR100. In our master bedroom there is a Connect Amp directly driving a pair of speakers. In our front room there is a ZonePlayer ZP90 connected to our AV receiver amplifier. On a top shelf in the Kitchen is another ZoneBridge BR100, directly connected to another pair of high quality bookshelf speakers.I m no audiophile, but we judge the sound quality to be the same as from a CD player directly attached to our AV receiver. Streamed audio, whether from FLAC files on my PC, or Amazon Music, or Pandora, seems quite pleasant to our ears. Audio quality never seems to suffer lack of quality, even with our relatively slow internet connection. The SONOS system broadcasts through the home on its own dedicate wireless network.Interconnections of the various SONOS components are easy. Installing the SONOS control program or application on your desktop or portable device is easy. User interface is quite well designed and executed. SONOS issues periodic software updates to the control program and installs have always been trouble free. SONOS includes provisions to easily connect the system to all of the popular internet music streaming services. Internet radio is easily connected by way of Pandora s free TUNED IN radio.While we have the Zone Bridge connected to a desk top PC, SONOS has made recent changes that allow this unit to be eliminated from the system. With the Zone Bridge installed music is broadcast through the house on a dedicated SONOS wireless network. With recent changes, the system can use your existing Wifi network and eliminate the Zone Bridge. I'm not informed about the trade offs of that choice. However, in my experience the SONOS technical support folks are very helpful and can easily be reached by telephone to explain the alternatives.We love to listen to music in our home, and listen almost all day long. I can t imagine a better wireless system than SONOS. 5Excellent, less expensive solution for a complete-home audio system This review was originally posted for the PLAY:1, but I'm modifying it for the BRIDGE since the review applies to both products.I just purchased a home and was looking into having it wired for whole-house audio. Looking into multi-room systems on Amazon, it was apparent to me that it wouldn't be cheap: cost of the speakers, controllers, PLUS cost of running wires throughout the house. When I saw the SONOS PLAY:1 and BRIDGE promotions, I found its wireless solution to be more cost effective, and with better speakers to boot. Below are the pros and cons that led me to decide for the Sonos system.NOTE: a Sonos BRIDGE is NOT needed to use the PLAY:1/3/5, etc. See the INSTALLATION section of this review. The BRIDGE is primarily used to extend Sonos' wireless range at lower cost than additional speakers.PROS- Hi-Fi. Speakers sound better than the multi-room, wired systems I looked at for less than $500.- Resale Value. Wired speakers don't add much resale value to your house. So, why spend $1000s, only to leave the audio system behind when you sell the property or move? With wireless, I could take my expensive speakers with me to my new home.- Freedom to move around.With wireless, you are free to take the speakers anywhere you want throughout the whole house. For neighborhood block parties, I could even hook up the speakers to an extension cord out to the street, and stream music from my home. Or take it outside to your backyard. They are moisture-proof, but I wouldn't use them as permanent outdoor speakers unless you enclose them in protective casings.NOTE on wireless: each SONOS component is its own wireless client and repeater. Sonos wireless is a private, wireless "mesh" system, separate from your home WiFi. What does that mean to you? It routes music through its own wireless, leaving your home WiFi untouched. There's an additional benefit for that, as I'll explain after the installation note below. Most of the Sonos components (PLAY:1 is NOT one of them) have 2 network ports. This means, you can plug in the component into the network jack, and use the 2nd one on the speaker to connect your laptop.INSTALLATION: First, the tech talk. You need 1 Sonos component to be plugged in to your home network (any of the PLAY speakers, Soundbar, Bridge, etc.) So, as an example, you must plug in either the BRIDGE or the PLAY:1 to your network with a network cable. This turns that component into a wireless access point (or as consumers tend to call it, a "Wifi router".) All other Sonos components will now be able to wirelessly talk to that plugged-in device. No other Sonos component has to be plugged in, as long as it's within wireless range of the plugged-in one. Should a component in your house be too far away (say, your garage) from the plugged-in one, you can connect it to your network via cable, if available, or set up a Sonos BRIDGE (or any other Sonos speaker) wirelessly somewhere between the plugged-in one and the Garage speaker. The BRIDGE or other speaker strengthens the wireless from the plugged-in one, and extends the range to the one in the Garage. Each Sonos component is both a wireless client, and a wireless access point/repeater. Each component talks to each other in a mesh network. Think of a spider net. Any part that is touched vibrates to the rest of the net.Tech-talk aside, think about this: One person (Person 1) is at a corner of the house. When he shouts, the person in the garage (Person 2) can't hear Person 1. The only way Person 1 can talk to 2, is to pick up the phone (talking over a wired connection, or plugging a distant Sonos component to the wired network) or having Person 3 stand between them (having a Sonos component physically be between both speakers) and relaying the information back and forth (what WiFi mesh would do). So, with each Sonos component/speaker, the Sonos wireless range gets extended.With the Sonos wireless mesh, you could humorously place a few speakers into each house in the neighborhood, and suddenly play the same music through each home. Try that with Bluetooth speakers. You wouldn't be able to.WiFi mesh TIP: if you have an Android device, you can Google "Android devices on SonosNet", and you will see instructions on how to use your Sonos wireless network ("SonosNet") to connect your Android phone/tablet. This allows you to use your mobile device further away from your home WiFi. This has disadvantages and advantages out of the scope of this review. I decided not to use SonosNet for my tablets.NOTE: a Sonos BRIDGE is NOT needed to use the PLAY:1. Just plug in the PLAY:1 to the wired network (ie your router), and it will work just fine. You still control it with the Sonos App from your mobile device. Once the PLAY:1 is plugged in, you can add other Sonos components to the system. A BRIDGE is NOT needed for that either. It's only needed if you want to extend the Sonos wireless range to a farther part of your house or yard for $50 vs buying another PLAY speaker for $100+)- Small size. The BRIDGE is about the same size as an Apple TV/Roku/WD TV Live.- Ease of Pairing. To pair other Sonos components (or with the Sonos Controller App), simply hit the Play/Volume Up button on the speaker, and the same combination on the other speakers. If pairing with the BRIDGE, hit the pair button on that component.- LED. The Bright LED can be configured to turn on/off via the Sonos app.- Ease of music sync.You can use the free Sonos app for your Android, iOS (iPhone/iPad/iPod), Windows Phone, Mac/Windows laptop/tablet (sadly, no Windows Store app yet) to control how the speakers play: you can easily choose which speakers to pair/unpair into groups. Grouping the speakers allows you to play the same music on those speakers. You can have up to 32 separate groups. You can also individually control each speaker from the app. Each group's volume is controlled by the Sonos app. So, if Speaker 1 is set to 50% volume, and Speaker 2 is set to 25%, lowering the volume by 5% will lower Speaker 1 to 45%, and 2 to 20%.Once music is playing, you can leave the house, and it will continue to play -- as long as the music source is not coming from that mobile device (meaning: if you're playing MP3s from your phone, and your phone leaves, it will stop playing. But if you started Pandora from your phone, or you told the speaker to play music off one of your network shares, it will continue playing since the source is coming from a device that's still at home.)PARTIES: one cool feature is that once you download the Sonos Controller app and pair it to one of the Sonos speakers (which authorizes the app/phone to talk to your Sonos system -- this prevents unauthorized people outside your home from controlling your speakers), each device can control the playlist. So, if you have guests coming over, and each guest downloads and authorizes the Sonos app to your system, each guest can now add/remove songs from the queue. Everybody can now be a DJ.- Expandability.Sonos did a smart thing. They released the less expensive PLAY:1 to wet your/my appetite, and gave away BRIDGE for free, too. As you use the system, you will likely buy more Sonos components to expand your sound system, resulting in more revenue for the company. You can add any Sonos component to your system, and they will all work in harmony. You can set up a complete home theater system that way too. I know, sounds pricey. It is. But it still is cheaper than having your whole house wired with nice speakers.- Alarm/Sleep timer.You can set up each speaker (or Group of speakers) to play music at a specific time, day, and volume (Alarm) from a specific source for a specified amount of time. Or you can also set a Sleep timer to play music for a specific number of minutes to ease you into sleep. I love getting waken up by mellow music (ie. Norah Jones) in the morning, and when I leave the home, I don't have to worry about turning off the speakers. It'll automatically turn off after the 45 minutes I set up for the alarm.- Sound. Sound quality is quite good. I will leave you with the reviews by others to read more about that. With the Sonos app, you can control Bass, Treble, and volume. I have the speakers play between 15% to 25% volume in each room -- they are plenty loud enough. Setting them to 100% can be heard through the whole house -- and the potential for your neighbors to complain. Even at low volume, the sound is very good. It's definitely better than most Bluetooth speakers. If you put the PLAY:1 in the corner of a room, the sound seems a bit more muffled due to the amplification of the Bass by the walls on both ends. You can fix this by adding more Treble, or by moving the speaker away from the corner.- Design. The PLAY:1 and BRIDGE are beautiful devices. They don't look out-of-place in my home. I bought the White ones.CONSI couldn't find many cons with the PLAY:1. But here are some that have annoyed me.- Cost. The Sonos system is expensive. Just look at the price of the other components. Holy moly. Still, if you were to wire your house with Bose speakers, the Sonos system is comparatively inexpensive. Again, I chose Sonos because wiring the house won't add much resale value. I like the idea of being able to take my Sonos with me to my new home.- Sonos App Interface. The app is clunky and looks outdated. It took me a while to figure out where to go to do what (and I love gadgets/toys. I'm a technology tinkerer!). It's not very user friendly.- Music sources. Not all apps can play to the Sonos speakers. You have to use the Sonos App, add the approved source to it, then you can play from that source. I wish you could re-route any audio from any device to the speakers. Pandora, network shares (NAS), iTunes, TuneIt Radio (built-in), iPod/iPad/iPhone, media files on your own Android/Windows device are all possible sources. At one point (if I remember correctly), my not-so-tech-savvy dad was able to beam his iPad's YouTube sound to the speakers without using the Sonos App. I didn't get a chance to verify how he did it, but I did see the PLAY:1 being available as a target on his iPad. Perhaps it was playing via the DLNA protocol. Either way, that was neat.- Input source. I wish that the PLAY:1 had a Line-in/Aux port so that you can connect any music source to it for playback, such as your TV or existing home entertainment system. Yes, the Sonos CONNECT takes care of that, but look at the price of that component! Even then, the CONNECT doesn't support SPDIF/Optical input.Weren't it for the Amazon/Target promotions on Black Friday, I would have been EXTREMELY hesitant to buy these expensive speakers. I bought two PLAY:1 during the promotion. With that said, overall, I'm quite pleased with the purchase. It came out cheaper than wiring the house, and I get to control my music from any of the mobile devices. That's neat. Lower the prices of your other components, Sonos! I hope for increased competition in the market to drive the prices down -- as of today, I'm not aware of any good, alternate, wireless HiFi solution.I have the BRIDGE installed downstairs in a 2-story home. One PLAY:1 is upstairs, and one PLAY:1 is downstairs. I may purchase more PLAY:1s in the future. The BRIDGE is not needed at all for my home since one of the PLAY:1 can act as the wireless access point for the other.------EDIT 5/12/14: Almost half a year later, and I'm still enjoying the PLAY:1. By the way, Sonos is working on making it unnecessary for any Sonos component to be connected to the wired network/router. From their blog post, titled, "Our Vision for Rock-Solid Wireless, Evolved" (April 17, 2014), "We've found a way to deliver all the benefits of SonosNet without a product directly connected to your router... Start with a speaker and your smartphone, enter your WiFi password and Sonos takes care of the rest."I've also updated my review with the clarification, "Most of the Sonos components (PLAY:1 is [NOT] one of them) have 2 network ports." (Thank you, JOEKC, for pointing out the original review's error)EDIT 6/16/14: Clarified that SonosNET is a proprietary wireless network. (Thanks, Kerton) 5Perfect Plug it in, download the app and you can start configuring a Sonos set up - in my case built out of Sonos 1 speakers. The folks at Sonos designed something that is downright simple and elegant. No complaints!If you want a whole house speaker system, look no future. The Sonos Bridge and Sonos 1 (I've not needed any of the other Sonos speaker units) work well together. The cost of the Bridge spread onto however many Sonos 1 units you buy is trivial. The total cost is far less that trying to install ceiling speakers and wiring. In addition, the Bridge allows you to set up sound room by room or group rooms into a common sound source. Any Apple, Android or PC device can control the system - in fact, many client devices can simultaneously run the Sonos application for control by multiple people at the same time. The Bridge allows you to associate your various online music/sound sources or local libraries so that they can be played over any Sonos speaker or group of speakers. Once the association has been made for the Bridge, the client device only needs start a playlist, album, song or stream and the Bridge directly handles it (i.e the music/sound source does not work through the client device but directly through the bridge - the client is a control surface only).Brilliant design by Sonos. 5Lives up to the hype I was looking for a replacement speaker to use outside for barbecues and pool parties. My current speaker is a rechargeable, waterproof speaker, but it is not wireless - I have to hook an MP3 player up directly to it. After much consideration and reading hundreds of reviews, I decided to go the SONOS route. I am not disappointed in the least with my decision. I have had this bridge and the PLAY:1 speaker for a couple weeks now, and from initial setup to configuration to library management and operation, this system is an absolute pleasure.I read the instructions, but there's really not much need - this thing is super intuitive. Plug it in and connect it via Ethernet cable to your router, download the app (mine is Android, but I also use the Windows desktop software from SONOS), and when you're prompted to add a device, you simply push a button on top of the bridge. Repeat that for any additional components you want to add, and you're set up.Adding music libraries and services is very easy as well. I set up a share on my Windows PC, then entered the share and authentication information into the SONOS app, and it found and indexed everything automatically. The only drawback of a local library share is that when my computer goes into sleep/hibernate mode, the share is unavailable. If that happens, and I don't want to just use another music service, I just head into the office and hit the space bar on my keyboard to wake the computer back up. I am now using the local library, Pandora, Google Play music, Amazon music, and iHeartRadio for my sources. I can easily add new items into the current queue from my library, Google Play, and Amazon, and they will all play in the correct order seamlessly. Or if I don't want to put forth the effort to create a queue (or load a saved queue), I just find a station on Pandora or iHeartRadio. I have not used this with Spotify, as the app told me I needed a premium (paid) account with Spotify to use it in SONOS, which I don't have.The range is very good, and I have never experienced dropouts or any other issues. The PLAY:1 speaker is often 75+ feet from the bridge (3 rooms over and through an exterior wall).I am thrilled with every aspect of the SONOS system, and I wouldn't hesitate to recommend it over a Bluetooth setup, mainly because of the increased fidelity and flexibility WiFi offers.The PLAY:1 speaker amazes me as well, but I'll save that for a review on that item. 5The key to multi-room sound I bought the Sonos Bridge with Play:1 and set it up this afternoon. Set-up would have been a breeze if I'd started with my iPhone as the "controller." I started with my $#@%$! Windows 8 laptop and after several attempts to connect I called customer service. Instead of waiting in the call queue, I elected to provide my call-back number and have them call me. I received the call back in less than an hour and the customer service tech was more than wonderful. While she remote-accessed my laptop to look at the firewall settings, verify router settings, etc., she had me install the Sonos app on my iPhone. With a few clicks I was able to use my iPhone as the controller and I'd also linked to my Amazon cloud music library and a local radio station. Amazing sound from the Play:1!Back on the laptop, after a few tweaks and restarting twice, I was able to use the laptop version of the controller and also index my iTunes library.Amazing customer support from Sonos, and if I'd started with the iPhone install I would have been amazed at how easy it was. As I did start with the laptop, there was the initial annoyance when the Bridge connection failed and a secondary worry that I would have to purchase a third-party router (I went through the Sonos website troubleshooting and there is a list of routers to avoid or work-around). I'm so happy I called customer support and that everything now works properly.The Bridge itself is compact, easy to plug-in and connects with the controller at the touch of a button. I'm going to be exploring all the radio stations, etc., I can get with the Sonos controller! 5Heart of a versatile, capable system The Bridge is the connection between the wireless capabilities of Sonos speakers and your router. You start by downloading a Sonos app that lets you control the speakers from your PC, Mac, iPhone/iPad or Android device -- sort of a wireless remote control. Then plug the Bridge into your router and follow the prompts on whatever device you've chosen to use as a controller -- for example on your iPhone -- and the app will recognize the Bridge. Then it prompts you to connect any speakers in the system that are plugged into a power outlet, and any other Sonos components. If you use a smartphone or a tablet as the controller and you have MP3 files on it, you can play your music immediately on the Sonos speakers. You also set the system up to play content from more free and subscription sources than you knew existed, including internet services like Pandoroa, and Google and Amazon subscription services and broadcast radio from around the world -- everything from the local hard rock station to BBC 4 to stations from a wide range of countries.Sonos makes everything work elegantly. The combination of packaging, product design and apparent simplicity match Apple's products. I say "apparent simplicity" because Sonos's on-line instructions for setting up your computer music library (e.g. your iTunes library on your home computer) so you can play music or other content (e.g. podcasts) are not quite as clear or accessible as they should be, But once you get set up, the system is amazingly flexible and powerful, and the Bridge connects all the (more expensive) pieces. 5SONOS BRIDGE Instant Set-up Solution for SONOS Wireless Network (BR100) SONOS...... This system is a phenomenon, it's an art, it's joint effort of many Engineers, scientists and many technicians and a great CEO at SONOS Lab, and it's from California With Love.( I do not work for SONOS, but I simply love SONOS bridge and speakers.)I, first heard SONOS sound system from Arizona, when I was on a trip to Scottsdale visiting a relative of mine.There was a small speaker residing in a corner in their kitchen it was playing Rick Braun " Kissing in the Rain" and it was dusk.It was awesome, fantastic, marvelous and I have never ever heard such quality in my entire life, from such a small speaker.It was SONOS Play One, speaker.SONOS System works in a different way, different style, different perspective. SONOS brings songs from all over the world, right at your home, with such clarity, frequency by frequency, decibels by decibels and you'll fall in love with SONOS sound system.In order to obtain these lovely music, it's necessary to buy an item called BRIDGE. I call it a HUB. It's almost like a Router at home.And that's what I bought as a starter along with a single SONOS Play One speaker. This is strange to call a speaker system " Play One". It doesn't play just one song.... It play 1000s songs from all over the world. Even from India !Since the advent of these two items, I have started listening to songs more than ever and I am amazed that there are such lovely Radio stations out there in the world. It has, even VOA !I bought two additional SONOS Play One Speakers. My wife, who doesn't care too much of listening to songs, has started listening to SONOS. She knows how to pair stereo in our bed room.I highly recommend that each and every one of you people out there, to buy SONOS BRIDGE and SONOS Play One Speakers and enjoy the music of the world.I have two SONOS BRIDGES and 3 SONOS Play One speakers at this moment. I will add more SONOS Play One speakers sooner.Why 2 SONOS BRIDGES? It's a back up or to use it during my travel overseas.Thank you SONOS, thank you AMAZON for introducing SONOS to us. 5SONOS Issues out of September 2014 software "Upgrade" I used to be a Sonos fan. Everything worked out so smoothly.... sound is great.... functionalities are (were?) almost ideal ...... adding components was a blast...... easy....... until they decided to rush a new controller version so that there is no need to use de Sonosnet and allow to use own wifi network to transmit music. This was made in the last few weeks (august september 2014). Then everything turned into a major nightmare. Components are lost from the network; those components that are still "seen", cannot access web music services, new components are not registered in the system. I can go on with issues out of this 5.1 software version "upgrade" made by Sonos. I invested quite a lot of $ in this system (three Play 1, one play 5, two Connects and a bridge) and can't use it at all. Support is obviously going through the same nightmare, so are totally helpless. This initiative by Sonos looks very much like the typical marketing driven desperation to rush into the market with a new feature that was not adequately tested in all conditions. Very likely, not even tested in the most usual conditions.UPDATE: After Sonos Customer Service. After a couple of failed attempts in Phone CService, I reached a CSR that was with me for about 1 hour or 90 minutes. He was probably the more patient CSR I experienced ever. A supervisor was handy to support him in the process. I also involved my own router technician. It happened to be that some Sonos items were not recognizing a fictitious MAC address of my router. All of my about 20 ethernet devices including two Play 1s, accepted this 11:11:11:11:11 MAC address. But the Bridge and the Connect did not. Therefore the whole thing was not working. The sonos CSR figured there was a MAC issue, and my router technician figured that might had to do with the MAC address masked for the router. He changed that to the original MAC, and voila, everything went back to be as smooth as ever. I understand this is a sophisticated device but there is some inconsistency in the design issue that allowed some Sonos devices to work and some other not under the same condition. I guess the new software did not help. BUT I do recognize that after going through various Tech Support processes, Sonos one, overall, is very good considering they sell 300 usd items and not 3000 usd items. I've had serious hard time with significantly higher ticket audio items like Denon receivers or Sony TVs, among others. This is why I raised the one star initial vote to 4 stars. 4
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Customer Reviews

Connect your speaker over wifi. Great investment Finally after months of debating I finally bought my first Sonos Speaker and know I'm going to by more so buying the bridge was a great cheap investment to make my experience better and seamless. Right now Sonos made the bridge optional but I saw if your planning to get the 3.1 or 5.1 surround sound so it worth getting. What the Bridge does since it connected to your router is makes your Sonos system it's own network so it doesn't interfere with your extorting wifi. But now I guess you can get the connect but that only to boost your wifi signal. 5Nice sound, but directions and app need work Recently I decided to upgrade my home sound system and decided to start with a SONOS Play:1 and a Bridge; the price looked about right and the thoughts of not having to have wires all over the places while having my place with music as I wanted it was appealing so I decided to start small and see what it was like. Opening the boxes (I picked up a bridge at the same time, this review is about my total experience) I have to say that SONOS did a quality job packing thing. Configuration seemed simple, plug in, download, and begin configuring; this is where the train starts coming off the track somewhat. The unpacking and plug in was simple enough (bridge to router, Play:1 and bridge into an outlet), the trouble started when I started configuring things. I went through SONOS s directions (select the component, push the button when the application tells you, continue on) and thought everything was working great; and it did for a little while. Actually the first round of music went smoothly and when I went to listen to some more my music cut out or skipped a little (or a lot). It seems that sometimes my Play:1 would cut out of the connection for no reason (the bridge was always there). Researching online I learned that the frequency used for out of the box by SONOS is near that of some wireless home phones and what needed to occur was to change the channel used, but to do that you needed to have the Play:1 and the bridge up at the same time good thing they provided the means for a direct connection. After doing the direct connection and changing the channel I was able to get wireless sound in my place (it was a near run to me returning the system).Rating wise the sound is a solid 5 but I have to rate the system a 4 because SONOS failed to make it an easy set-up. By providing a simple sheet with common setup or connection problems I d have given this a 5 star rating but don t feel I can because of the pain, need to learn, and almost reaching the point of returning the product. (Note: on the SONOS website under FAQs they mention that SONOS uses 2.4 Ghz, the same as some phones). 4Very Satisfied Long-Term Users We ve been satisfied users of SONOS system now for more than five years, using it almost daily with no problems with any component. I purchased it after a long search of alternative wireless ways to play my digital music collection through the house. About six years ago I converted and transferred my collection of over 5,000 CD s to FLAC files stored on my desk top PC, but now we mostly stream our music from Amazon Music, and before that from Pandora.This SONOS system can seem a little complicated at first, trying to figure ou what components are needed. We have four component pieces that play music in three different rooms of our house, and each room could be playing different music, although we never use that feature.Connected to our desktop PC is a ZoneBridge BR100. In our master bedroom there is a Connect Amp directly driving a pair of speakers. In our front room there is a ZonePlayer ZP90 connected to our AV receiver amplifier. On a top shelf in the Kitchen is another ZoneBridge BR100, directly connected to another pair of high quality bookshelf speakers.I m no audiophile, but we judge the sound quality to be the same as from a CD player directly attached to our AV receiver. Streamed audio, whether from FLAC files on my PC, or Amazon Music, or Pandora, seems quite pleasant to our ears. Audio quality never seems to suffer lack of quality, even with our relatively slow internet connection. The SONOS system broadcasts through the home on its own dedicate wireless network.Interconnections of the various SONOS components are easy. Installing the SONOS control program or application on your desktop or portable device is easy. User interface is quite well designed and executed. SONOS issues periodic software updates to the control program and installs have always been trouble free. SONOS includes provisions to easily connect the system to all of the popular internet music streaming services. Internet radio is easily connected by way of Pandora s free TUNED IN radio.While we have the Zone Bridge connected to a desk top PC, SONOS has made recent changes that allow this unit to be eliminated from the system. With the Zone Bridge installed music is broadcast through the house on a dedicated SONOS wireless network. With recent changes, the system can use your existing Wifi network and eliminate the Zone Bridge. I'm not informed about the trade offs of that choice. However, in my experience the SONOS technical support folks are very helpful and can easily be reached by telephone to explain the alternatives.We love to listen to music in our home, and listen almost all day long. I can t imagine a better wireless system than SONOS. 5Excellent, less expensive solution for a complete-home audio system This review was originally posted for the PLAY:1, but I'm modifying it for the BRIDGE since the review applies to both products.I just purchased a home and was looking into having it wired for whole-house audio. Looking into multi-room systems on Amazon, it was apparent to me that it wouldn't be cheap: cost of the speakers, controllers, PLUS cost of running wires throughout the house. When I saw the SONOS PLAY:1 and BRIDGE promotions, I found its wireless solution to be more cost effective, and with better speakers to boot. Below are the pros and cons that led me to decide for the Sonos system.NOTE: a Sonos BRIDGE is NOT needed to use the PLAY:1/3/5, etc. See the INSTALLATION section of this review. The BRIDGE is primarily used to extend Sonos' wireless range at lower cost than additional speakers.PROS- Hi-Fi. Speakers sound better than the multi-room, wired systems I looked at for less than $500.- Resale Value. Wired speakers don't add much resale value to your house. So, why spend $1000s, only to leave the audio system behind when you sell the property or move? With wireless, I could take my expensive speakers with me to my new home.- Freedom to move around.With wireless, you are free to take the speakers anywhere you want throughout the whole house. For neighborhood block parties, I could even hook up the speakers to an extension cord out to the street, and stream music from my home. Or take it outside to your backyard. They are moisture-proof, but I wouldn't use them as permanent outdoor speakers unless you enclose them in protective casings.NOTE on wireless: each SONOS component is its own wireless client and repeater. Sonos wireless is a private, wireless "mesh" system, separate from your home WiFi. What does that mean to you? It routes music through its own wireless, leaving your home WiFi untouched. There's an additional benefit for that, as I'll explain after the installation note below. Most of the Sonos components (PLAY:1 is NOT one of them) have 2 network ports. This means, you can plug in the component into the network jack, and use the 2nd one on the speaker to connect your laptop.INSTALLATION: First, the tech talk. You need 1 Sonos component to be plugged in to your home network (any of the PLAY speakers, Soundbar, Bridge, etc.) So, as an example, you must plug in either the BRIDGE or the PLAY:1 to your network with a network cable. This turns that component into a wireless access point (or as consumers tend to call it, a "Wifi router".) All other Sonos components will now be able to wirelessly talk to that plugged-in device. No other Sonos component has to be plugged in, as long as it's within wireless range of the plugged-in one. Should a component in your house be too far away (say, your garage) from the plugged-in one, you can connect it to your network via cable, if available, or set up a Sonos BRIDGE (or any other Sonos speaker) wirelessly somewhere between the plugged-in one and the Garage speaker. The BRIDGE or other speaker strengthens the wireless from the plugged-in one, and extends the range to the one in the Garage. Each Sonos component is both a wireless client, and a wireless access point/repeater. Each component talks to each other in a mesh network. Think of a spider net. Any part that is touched vibrates to the rest of the net.Tech-talk aside, think about this: One person (Person 1) is at a corner of the house. When he shouts, the person in the garage (Person 2) can't hear Person 1. The only way Person 1 can talk to 2, is to pick up the phone (talking over a wired connection, or plugging a distant Sonos component to the wired network) or having Person 3 stand between them (having a Sonos component physically be between both speakers) and relaying the information back and forth (what WiFi mesh would do). So, with each Sonos component/speaker, the Sonos wireless range gets extended.With the Sonos wireless mesh, you could humorously place a few speakers into each house in the neighborhood, and suddenly play the same music through each home. Try that with Bluetooth speakers. You wouldn't be able to.WiFi mesh TIP: if you have an Android device, you can Google "Android devices on SonosNet", and you will see instructions on how to use your Sonos wireless network ("SonosNet") to connect your Android phone/tablet. This allows you to use your mobile device further away from your home WiFi. This has disadvantages and advantages out of the scope of this review. I decided not to use SonosNet for my tablets.NOTE: a Sonos BRIDGE is NOT needed to use the PLAY:1. Just plug in the PLAY:1 to the wired network (ie your router), and it will work just fine. You still control it with the Sonos App from your mobile device. Once the PLAY:1 is plugged in, you can add other Sonos components to the system. A BRIDGE is NOT needed for that either. It's only needed if you want to extend the Sonos wireless range to a farther part of your house or yard for $50 vs buying another PLAY speaker for $100+)- Small size. The BRIDGE is about the same size as an Apple TV/Roku/WD TV Live.- Ease of Pairing. To pair other Sonos components (or with the Sonos Controller App), simply hit the Play/Volume Up button on the speaker, and the same combination on the other speakers. If pairing with the BRIDGE, hit the pair button on that component.- LED. The Bright LED can be configured to turn on/off via the Sonos app.- Ease of music sync.You can use the free Sonos app for your Android, iOS (iPhone/iPad/iPod), Windows Phone, Mac/Windows laptop/tablet (sadly, no Windows Store app yet) to control how the speakers play: you can easily choose which speakers to pair/unpair into groups. Grouping the speakers allows you to play the same music on those speakers. You can have up to 32 separate groups. You can also individually control each speaker from the app. Each group's volume is controlled by the Sonos app. So, if Speaker 1 is set to 50% volume, and Speaker 2 is set to 25%, lowering the volume by 5% will lower Speaker 1 to 45%, and 2 to 20%.Once music is playing, you can leave the house, and it will continue to play -- as long as the music source is not coming from that mobile device (meaning: if you're playing MP3s from your phone, and your phone leaves, it will stop playing. But if you started Pandora from your phone, or you told the speaker to play music off one of your network shares, it will continue playing since the source is coming from a device that's still at home.)PARTIES: one cool feature is that once you download the Sonos Controller app and pair it to one of the Sonos speakers (which authorizes the app/phone to talk to your Sonos system -- this prevents unauthorized people outside your home from controlling your speakers), each device can control the playlist. So, if you have guests coming over, and each guest downloads and authorizes the Sonos app to your system, each guest can now add/remove songs from the queue. Everybody can now be a DJ.- Expandability.Sonos did a smart thing. They released the less expensive PLAY:1 to wet your/my appetite, and gave away BRIDGE for free, too. As you use the system, you will likely buy more Sonos components to expand your sound system, resulting in more revenue for the company. You can add any Sonos component to your system, and they will all work in harmony. You can set up a complete home theater system that way too. I know, sounds pricey. It is. But it still is cheaper than having your whole house wired with nice speakers.- Alarm/Sleep timer.You can set up each speaker (or Group of speakers) to play music at a specific time, day, and volume (Alarm) from a specific source for a specified amount of time. Or you can also set a Sleep timer to play music for a specific number of minutes to ease you into sleep. I love getting waken up by mellow music (ie. Norah Jones) in the morning, and when I leave the home, I don't have to worry about turning off the speakers. It'll automatically turn off after the 45 minutes I set up for the alarm.- Sound. Sound quality is quite good. I will leave you with the reviews by others to read more about that. With the Sonos app, you can control Bass, Treble, and volume. I have the speakers play between 15% to 25% volume in each room -- they are plenty loud enough. Setting them to 100% can be heard through the whole house -- and the potential for your neighbors to complain. Even at low volume, the sound is very good. It's definitely better than most Bluetooth speakers. If you put the PLAY:1 in the corner of a room, the sound seems a bit more muffled due to the amplification of the Bass by the walls on both ends. You can fix this by adding more Treble, or by moving the speaker away from the corner.- Design. The PLAY:1 and BRIDGE are beautiful devices. They don't look out-of-place in my home. I bought the White ones.CONSI couldn't find many cons with the PLAY:1. But here are some that have annoyed me.- Cost. The Sonos system is expensive. Just look at the price of the other components. Holy moly. Still, if you were to wire your house with Bose speakers, the Sonos system is comparatively inexpensive. Again, I chose Sonos because wiring the house won't add much resale value. I like the idea of being able to take my Sonos with me to my new home.- Sonos App Interface. The app is clunky and looks outdated. It took me a while to figure out where to go to do what (and I love gadgets/toys. I'm a technology tinkerer!). It's not very user friendly.- Music sources. Not all apps can play to the Sonos speakers. You have to use the Sonos App, add the approved source to it, then you can play from that source. I wish you could re-route any audio from any device to the speakers. Pandora, network shares (NAS), iTunes, TuneIt Radio (built-in), iPod/iPad/iPhone, media files on your own Android/Windows device are all possible sources. At one point (if I remember correctly), my not-so-tech-savvy dad was able to beam his iPad's YouTube sound to the speakers without using the Sonos App. I didn't get a chance to verify how he did it, but I did see the PLAY:1 being available as a target on his iPad. Perhaps it was playing via the DLNA protocol. Either way, that was neat.- Input source. I wish that the PLAY:1 had a Line-in/Aux port so that you can connect any music source to it for playback, such as your TV or existing home entertainment system. Yes, the Sonos CONNECT takes care of that, but look at the price of that component! Even then, the CONNECT doesn't support SPDIF/Optical input.Weren't it for the Amazon/Target promotions on Black Friday, I would have been EXTREMELY hesitant to buy these expensive speakers. I bought two PLAY:1 during the promotion. With that said, overall, I'm quite pleased with the purchase. It came out cheaper than wiring the house, and I get to control my music from any of the mobile devices. That's neat. Lower the prices of your other components, Sonos! I hope for increased competition in the market to drive the prices down -- as of today, I'm not aware of any good, alternate, wireless HiFi solution.I have the BRIDGE installed downstairs in a 2-story home. One PLAY:1 is upstairs, and one PLAY:1 is downstairs. I may purchase more PLAY:1s in the future. The BRIDGE is not needed at all for my home since one of the PLAY:1 can act as the wireless access point for the other.------EDIT 5/12/14: Almost half a year later, and I'm still enjoying the PLAY:1. By the way, Sonos is working on making it unnecessary for any Sonos component to be connected to the wired network/router. From their blog post, titled, "Our Vision for Rock-Solid Wireless, Evolved" (April 17, 2014), "We've found a way to deliver all the benefits of SonosNet without a product directly connected to your router... Start with a speaker and your smartphone, enter your WiFi password and Sonos takes care of the rest."I've also updated my review with the clarification, "Most of the Sonos components (PLAY:1 is [NOT] one of them) have 2 network ports." (Thank you, JOEKC, for pointing out the original review's error)EDIT 6/16/14: Clarified that SonosNET is a proprietary wireless network. (Thanks, Kerton) 5Perfect Plug it in, download the app and you can start configuring a Sonos set up - in my case built out of Sonos 1 speakers. The folks at Sonos designed something that is downright simple and elegant. No complaints!If you want a whole house speaker system, look no future. The Sonos Bridge and Sonos 1 (I've not needed any of the other Sonos speaker units) work well together. The cost of the Bridge spread onto however many Sonos 1 units you buy is trivial. The total cost is far less that trying to install ceiling speakers and wiring. In addition, the Bridge allows you to set up sound room by room or group rooms into a common sound source. Any Apple, Android or PC device can control the system - in fact, many client devices can simultaneously run the Sonos application for control by multiple people at the same time. The Bridge allows you to associate your various online music/sound sources or local libraries so that they can be played over any Sonos speaker or group of speakers. Once the association has been made for the Bridge, the client device only needs start a playlist, album, song or stream and the Bridge directly handles it (i.e the music/sound source does not work through the client device but directly through the bridge - the client is a control surface only).Brilliant design by Sonos. 5Lives up to the hype I was looking for a replacement speaker to use outside for barbecues and pool parties. My current speaker is a rechargeable, waterproof speaker, but it is not wireless - I have to hook an MP3 player up directly to it. After much consideration and reading hundreds of reviews, I decided to go the SONOS route. I am not disappointed in the least with my decision. I have had this bridge and the PLAY:1 speaker for a couple weeks now, and from initial setup to configuration to library management and operation, this system is an absolute pleasure.I read the instructions, but there's really not much need - this thing is super intuitive. Plug it in and connect it via Ethernet cable to your router, download the app (mine is Android, but I also use the Windows desktop software from SONOS), and when you're prompted to add a device, you simply push a button on top of the bridge. Repeat that for any additional components you want to add, and you're set up.Adding music libraries and services is very easy as well. I set up a share on my Windows PC, then entered the share and authentication information into the SONOS app, and it found and indexed everything automatically. The only drawback of a local library share is that when my computer goes into sleep/hibernate mode, the share is unavailable. If that happens, and I don't want to just use another music service, I just head into the office and hit the space bar on my keyboard to wake the computer back up. I am now using the local library, Pandora, Google Play music, Amazon music, and iHeartRadio for my sources. I can easily add new items into the current queue from my library, Google Play, and Amazon, and they will all play in the correct order seamlessly. Or if I don't want to put forth the effort to create a queue (or load a saved queue), I just find a station on Pandora or iHeartRadio. I have not used this with Spotify, as the app told me I needed a premium (paid) account with Spotify to use it in SONOS, which I don't have.The range is very good, and I have never experienced dropouts or any other issues. The PLAY:1 speaker is often 75+ feet from the bridge (3 rooms over and through an exterior wall).I am thrilled with every aspect of the SONOS system, and I wouldn't hesitate to recommend it over a Bluetooth setup, mainly because of the increased fidelity and flexibility WiFi offers.The PLAY:1 speaker amazes me as well, but I'll save that for a review on that item. 5The key to multi-room sound I bought the Sonos Bridge with Play:1 and set it up this afternoon. Set-up would have been a breeze if I'd started with my iPhone as the "controller." I started with my $#@%$! Windows 8 laptop and after several attempts to connect I called customer service. Instead of waiting in the call queue, I elected to provide my call-back number and have them call me. I received the call back in less than an hour and the customer service tech was more than wonderful. While she remote-accessed my laptop to look at the firewall settings, verify router settings, etc., she had me install the Sonos app on my iPhone. With a few clicks I was able to use my iPhone as the controller and I'd also linked to my Amazon cloud music library and a local radio station. Amazing sound from the Play:1!Back on the laptop, after a few tweaks and restarting twice, I was able to use the laptop version of the controller and also index my iTunes library.Amazing customer support from Sonos, and if I'd started with the iPhone install I would have been amazed at how easy it was. As I did start with the laptop, there was the initial annoyance when the Bridge connection failed and a secondary worry that I would have to purchase a third-party router (I went through the Sonos website troubleshooting and there is a list of routers to avoid or work-around). I'm so happy I called customer support and that everything now works properly.The Bridge itself is compact, easy to plug-in and connects with the controller at the touch of a button. I'm going to be exploring all the radio stations, etc., I can get with the Sonos controller! 5Heart of a versatile, capable system The Bridge is the connection between the wireless capabilities of Sonos speakers and your router. You start by downloading a Sonos app that lets you control the speakers from your PC, Mac, iPhone/iPad or Android device -- sort of a wireless remote control. Then plug the Bridge into your router and follow the prompts on whatever device you've chosen to use as a controller -- for example on your iPhone -- and the app will recognize the Bridge. Then it prompts you to connect any speakers in the system that are plugged into a power outlet, and any other Sonos components. If you use a smartphone or a tablet as the controller and you have MP3 files on it, you can play your music immediately on the Sonos speakers. You also set the system up to play content from more free and subscription sources than you knew existed, including internet services like Pandoroa, and Google and Amazon subscription services and broadcast radio from around the world -- everything from the local hard rock station to BBC 4 to stations from a wide range of countries.Sonos makes everything work elegantly. The combination of packaging, product design and apparent simplicity match Apple's products. I say "apparent simplicity" because Sonos's on-line instructions for setting up your computer music library (e.g. your iTunes library on your home computer) so you can play music or other content (e.g. podcasts) are not quite as clear or accessible as they should be, But once you get set up, the system is amazingly flexible and powerful, and the Bridge connects all the (more expensive) pieces. 5SONOS BRIDGE Instant Set-up Solution for SONOS Wireless Network (BR100) SONOS...... This system is a phenomenon, it's an art, it's joint effort of many Engineers, scientists and many technicians and a great CEO at SONOS Lab, and it's from California With Love.( I do not work for SONOS, but I simply love SONOS bridge and speakers.)I, first heard SONOS sound system from Arizona, when I was on a trip to Scottsdale visiting a relative of mine.There was a small speaker residing in a corner in their kitchen it was playing Rick Braun " Kissing in the Rain" and it was dusk.It was awesome, fantastic, marvelous and I have never ever heard such quality in my entire life, from such a small speaker.It was SONOS Play One, speaker.SONOS System works in a different way, different style, different perspective. SONOS brings songs from all over the world, right at your home, with such clarity, frequency by frequency, decibels by decibels and you'll fall in love with SONOS sound system.In order to obtain these lovely music, it's necessary to buy an item called BRIDGE. I call it a HUB. It's almost like a Router at home.And that's what I bought as a starter along with a single SONOS Play One speaker. This is strange to call a speaker system " Play One". It doesn't play just one song.... It play 1000s songs from all over the world. Even from India !Since the advent of these two items, I have started listening to songs more than ever and I am amazed that there are such lovely Radio stations out there in the world. It has, even VOA !I bought two additional SONOS Play One Speakers. My wife, who doesn't care too much of listening to songs, has started listening to SONOS. She knows how to pair stereo in our bed room.I highly recommend that each and every one of you people out there, to buy SONOS BRIDGE and SONOS Play One Speakers and enjoy the music of the world.I have two SONOS BRIDGES and 3 SONOS Play One speakers at this moment. I will add more SONOS Play One speakers sooner.Why 2 SONOS BRIDGES? It's a back up or to use it during my travel overseas.Thank you SONOS, thank you AMAZON for introducing SONOS to us. 5SONOS Issues out of September 2014 software "Upgrade" I used to be a Sonos fan. Everything worked out so smoothly.... sound is great.... functionalities are (were?) almost ideal ...... adding components was a blast...... easy....... until they decided to rush a new controller version so that there is no need to use de Sonosnet and allow to use own wifi network to transmit music. This was made in the last few weeks (august september 2014). Then everything turned into a major nightmare. Components are lost from the network; those components that are still "seen", cannot access web music services, new components are not registered in the system. I can go on with issues out of this 5.1 software version "upgrade" made by Sonos. I invested quite a lot of $ in this system (three Play 1, one play 5, two Connects and a bridge) and can't use it at all. Support is obviously going through the same nightmare, so are totally helpless. This initiative by Sonos looks very much like the typical marketing driven desperation to rush into the market with a new feature that was not adequately tested in all conditions. Very likely, not even tested in the most usual conditions.UPDATE: After Sonos Customer Service. After a couple of failed attempts in Phone CService, I reached a CSR that was with me for about 1 hour or 90 minutes. He was probably the more patient CSR I experienced ever. A supervisor was handy to support him in the process. I also involved my own router technician. It happened to be that some Sonos items were not recognizing a fictitious MAC address of my router. All of my about 20 ethernet devices including two Play 1s, accepted this 11:11:11:11:11 MAC address. But the Bridge and the Connect did not. Therefore the whole thing was not working. The sonos CSR figured there was a MAC issue, and my router technician figured that might had to do with the MAC address masked for the router. He changed that to the original MAC, and voila, everything went back to be as smooth as ever. I understand this is a sophisticated device but there is some inconsistency in the design issue that allowed some Sonos devices to work and some other not under the same condition. I guess the new software did not help. BUT I do recognize that after going through various Tech Support processes, Sonos one, overall, is very good considering they sell 300 usd items and not 3000 usd items. I've had serious hard time with significantly higher ticket audio items like Denon receivers or Sony TVs, among others. This is why I raised the one star initial vote to 4 stars. 4
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