• Se Diamond Hole Saw Set With 80 Grit And 1/4" Shank Size (6 Pc.)   Dh6 Hs
  • Se Diamond Hole Saw Set With 80 Grit And 1/4" Shank Size (6 Pc.)   Dh6 Hs
  • Se Diamond Hole Saw Set With 80 Grit And 1/4" Shank Size (6 Pc.)   Dh6 Hs
  • Se Diamond Hole Saw Set With 80 Grit And 1/4" Shank Size (6 Pc.)   Dh6 Hs
  • Se Diamond Hole Saw Set With 80 Grit And 1/4" Shank Size (6 Pc.)   Dh6 Hs
  • Se Diamond Hole Saw Set With 80 Grit And 1/4" Shank Size (6 Pc.)   Dh6 Hs
Se Diamond Hole Saw Set With 80 Grit And 1/4" Shank Size (6 Pc.)   Dh6 Hs
Se Diamond Hole Saw Set With 80 Grit And 1/4" Shank Size (6 Pc.)   Dh6 Hs
Se Diamond Hole Saw Set With 80 Grit And 1/4" Shank Size (6 Pc.)   Dh6 Hs
Se Diamond Hole Saw Set With 80 Grit And 1/4" Shank Size (6 Pc.)   Dh6 Hs
Se Diamond Hole Saw Set With 80 Grit And 1/4" Shank Size (6 Pc.)   Dh6 Hs
Se Diamond Hole Saw Set With 80 Grit And 1/4" Shank Size (6 Pc.)   Dh6 Hs

Se Diamond Hole Saw Set With 80 Grit And 1/4" Shank Size (6 Pc.) Dh6 Hs

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MRP: €42,00
Regular price
€70,00
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per 
( 40% off )
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Expected Delivery: 21-28 days
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Product price is exclusive of such duties.

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  • 6 Hole saw sizes: 5/32", 3/16", 1/4", 5/16", 3/8", 1/2"
  • Shank size: 1/4"
  • Grit: 80
  • Nickel plated
  • Diamond-coated tips

Customer Reviews

Great bits!After reading the positive reviews on these bits, I decided to give them a try on a little project. I just bought a house with some very outdated lighting pendants. I wanted to replace them, but saw that the glass orb pendants I wanted would cost several hundred dollars. I figured I could just replace the old looking pendant covers with my own glass orbs. I went to Walmart and found some round glass vases that were exactly what I was looking for. They were only $2 each, so it wouldn't cost much to give it a try. I bought 3 of them and drilled a hole in the bottom of each one using the larger diamond hole saw bit. I did this in my kitchen sink while running a small stream of water from the faucet over the area being drilled. It took about 20-30 minutes for each piece, but the end result was worth it. Instead of spending over $200-$300 for some new glass orb pendants, I spent about $6 for the glass bowls and about $6 for the drill bits!I'm very happy with these bits. They did exactly as advertised and were a good price. As far as I'm concerned, they already paid for themselves with the savings I just got from not having to buy new pendants! I would definitely recommend these to anyone who needs to cut a hole in glass. 5How to use tips I am using this to drill through glazed ceramic flower pots to allow water to pass through and I would like to include a few tips being that everyone else has already said how great these hole saws cut.Being a hole saw without a pilot drill, follow these tips for cutting on a slippery surface: 1) Begin drilling on an angle until the surface has been scratched enough to hold the hole saw in place. Don't try an force the drill straight down from the angled cut, but slowing bring it square with the surface.2) no special oils are required, simply use any vegetable oil by dipping the drill bit in the oil every few seconds or when the surface begins to appear dry. vegetable oil may also be applied to the groove if it is the preferred method. Be creative and keep the drill wet.Some have mentioned that the larger bit is difficult to use,, once again, hold the drill on an angle to scratch surface. Yes, the drill may jump a little, but eventually the groove will appear and you can slowly begin squaring off the drill. The groove will hold it in place as the drill is brought upright. - adjust RPM's to find the best speed.I will try and post a video for additional info. 5How to Drill Drainage Holes in Ceramic Flower PotsThese are awesome! I had a lot of very pretty ceramic and terra cotta flower pots with no drain holes, and no matter what I did, the roots would rot and they would stink. I got these bits, drilled holed in the bottoms and now I can use all my pretty pots! I find a lot of great clearance deals too, as people pass by the pots without holes, but since I can drill my own, no worries! It is super easy, and I've done at least a dozen now, so here are some tips if you are leery about trying this yourself:1. Pick a practice pot first, don't start with Great Grandma's antique tea pot.2. Go outside or in the garage, as there will be chalky water sprayed around. Put on some safety or sun glasses so it doesn't get in your eyes.3. Turn your pot upside down. Decide how many holes, how big, (which bit) and where. Mark with sharpie if needed. Just don't put holes too close together, as the area in between the holes will be weak, you don't want the whole bottom the break open. Same goes for the edges, don't go too close to the outside edges. I try to keep about an inch of ceramic intact around my holes, even more, on larger pots.4. Be sure to drill wet- put a little water on the surface where you are drilling so it doesn't get too hot. Sometimes I put the pot upside down in a pail of water just deep enough so the bottom of the pot is barely under water, or if the pot has an indentation on the bottom, I just pour some water in there. You don't need a lot, just have the surface covered, 1/2" is plenty. Since I do this outside, I just keep the hose next to me so I can add more water as needed.5. Hold the bit snug against the bottom of the pot with the bit tipped just slightly to the side, not totally flush, this is so just the side/edge of the bit can dig a little groove to get you started. This is especially important if bottom is glazed and slippery or if the pot is delicate.6. Start slow, and let the bit do most of the work. If your drill has a fast and slow setting, turn it to slow.7. Once you have cut thru the glaze (if any) and have a little groove started, this will help keep your bit in place for the rest of the job. Gradually turn the drill straight so your bit is straight up and down, and gradually drill through. Add more water if needed.8. Don't press really hard but at the same time, you need a firm grip on the drill, and you need to gradually apply pressure so you drill thru the pot. Depending on how thick the ceramic is, you might need to put your weight into it a little. You will get the hang of it quickly. I do this on my knees with the pot on the ground or in a pail of water sitting on the ground, so I can feel totally in control of the situation.9. Pay attention to how close you are getting to breaking thru, because once you do, it will be sudden, and you will need to stop applying pressure immediately or you might pitch forward and crash thru the bottom of your pot with your whole drill.10. Gently pull the drill up out of the hole. There will be a ceramic plug (the piece you drilled out) either stuck inside the bit, or under the pot. If it is stuck inside the bit, just tap the side of the bit against something hard, and it will fall out.11. Admire your handiwork, and start planting! 5Worked great for drilling holes in wine bottlesWorked great for drilling holes in wine bottles.Recommendation:Place to 2 x 4's parallel on a flat surface.Cover wood with a towel. This now makes a cradle to hold the bottles.Make a ring or doughnut out of clay or plumbers putty and place that over the intended hole site.Fill the ring with some water to cool the saw.IMPORTANT: You must use water to cool the bit our you will ruin it with just a couple of cuts.Place your saw in your drill and set it to slow speed.Start with the drill at a bout a 45 degree angle and let the edge of the drill bit cut a small groove in the glass.Slowly tip the drill to the vertical position all the while keeping it spinning at a slow speed.Once vertical you can increase the speed and finish the hole.Sand the edges and insert your lights.HAVE FUN 5One Way to Keep the Saw from "Walking" as You Start Your HoleThese diamond hole saws work very well. A problem some people mentioned is the difficulty in getting the cut started without the saw "walking" across the surface they are trying to cut. I needed to drill bathroom-wall tile to install grab bars. Before I began drilling the tile, I cut a 1" hole in a 3/4" thick board that was about 3" W x 6" L). Then I sanded the hole to make it slightly bigger so the 1" saw would just barely pass through it easily. When I was ready to drill the tile, I put the guide-board flat on the tile, centering its hole over where I wanted the hole in the tile. Then I held it tightly against the wall, put the hole saw through it and against the tile, and then began drilling at a very slow speed to cut the tile. Once the cut was well started, I removed the board and finished cutting the hole in the tile without it. It was not hard to hold the board in place while making the initial cut (if need be, one could position the guide-board with duct tape until they have the saw blade through and against the tile, then they could also hold the board in place with their free hand after they had the saw in place, just before they were ready to begin drilling). I drilled 6 holes through the tile, and this method eliminated "walking" without much effort at all. Remember to run the drill at very slow RPM (after I had my initial cut and removed the board, I used water to keep the bit cool). Go slow, be safe, good luck.6/16/2016 UPDATE. I tried making the template I described in my original post from a 4x8" piece of cardboard box instead of wood. I cut the hole through the cardboard with the same size hole saw I was going to use. I just held the cardboard firmly against the bathroom tile as I started the drill with the other hand. Start drilling very slowly, and soon you will have a perfect circle started, deep enough that you can stop using the cardboard. Be sure to pour water over the tile at the cutting end of the hole saw repeatedly to keep it cool and sharp.... plus it eliminates the dust. (I was installing a grab bar through ceramic wall-tiles and the plaster wall behind the tiles.) 5READ PLEASE! AWESOME PRODUCT!I use these to drill through glass flower vases and wine bottles. The first project was piping through a 1/2" thick vase to use as a candle holder. I marked my cut with black permanent marker. I put the vase in my kitchen sink and let the water trickle on where the cut was going to be. On a very slow speed and with the 1" bit I held the bit steady with my hand on the vase and the upper part of the bit. This thing cut through like a hot knife through butter. The bits are holding up Awesome. I would definitely recommend them to a friend. If this review helped you please vote my review as helpful. 5BEWARE! Not the sizes listed!BEWARE! Not the sizes listed in the description!!! I bought this set specifically because it was the only one I saw that had the 2-3/4" drill, which I specifically needed. When the kit arrived, it was the part # ordered but the largest size drill was 2-3/8"! And the sizes of the other drills were not as listed--some were and some weren't. A second specific size I needed was also NOT in the kit (1-3/4", which is a very common size for drains). The drills are also less than 1-1/4" deep, which means they will not drill through much of the granite slabs out there. This ruined my entire weekend and project. Amazon customer service agents didn't speak English well enough to understand that it wasn't missing parts but rather that the parts in it were not as advertised, and they simply wanted to send me another one. It would appear that all the kits are this way as a bigger drill will not fit in this box. The sizes I received were 2-3/8", 2", 1-1/2", 1-3/8", 1-1/4", 1", 3/4", 1/2", 3/8", 1/4". I had to order just the drills I needed individually at much higher cost and Amazon sent them to me "next day" and I received them 3 days later. Worst Amazon experience ever. Not sure what is going in there, but it definitely did not feel like I was dealing with "The Earth's Most Customer-Centric Company" as they claim they're building. 1SE Diamond Hole SawI use these bits to cut holes in wine bottles (the wife puts lights in them as a craft) and they work fairly well for this purpose. I used to use the spade bits, but ended up breaking 50% of the bottles I tried to cut. The hole saws not only cut faster/easier, they dropped the breakage rate down to about 25%. So why three stars? These are just "OK" quality. After about 3 or 4 bottles, the effectiveness dwindles rapidly. After 6 or so, they are pretty much spent. I'm guessing this may be par for the course with regard to longevity; I just figured the glass vs. diamond/steel battle would last a little longer. The price is spot-on, so if you just need to do one or two cuts, you can't beat 'em!Some words to the wise:1. Make sure the item you are cutting is secure, and start your cut at a 30-degree angle. Don't move the bit until you have cut a C-shaped "seat", as this will keep the edge from skipping all over the place.2. Use water during your cuts. Heat is one of the major culprits in cracking glass/ceramics, and the water will act as a coolant and a lubricant to minimize damage. As many know, introducing cold water to hot glass spells disaster, so START your cut using water.3. Be patient. Forcing your cuts will result in breakage more often than not. If the cut is too slow, it's probably time to replace the tool.4. As another review mentioned, these don't fit in a Dremel tool collet, so if that is your tool of choice, keep looking.5. These work best with an AC-powered hand drill or a full-sized drill press. Cordless drills generally don't produce the torque and RPMs these hole saws need. Your milage may vary...The bottom line is that I will continue to buy these on an as-needed basis, but don't feel they are anything to write home about. 3Great saw bits-low cost-size is not accurateThe large bit is great, I used it to drill two holes in glazed ceramic tile to mount a shower curtain rod. The rod needs to go into the wall, not just up to the surface. I made a locating template with 1/4 inch plywood and a one inch hole in the center and duct taped it to the tile. Masking tape is not the answer for this. As other reviewers advised, I used a wet sponge to drip a stream of water on the wall above the cutter as I drilled. This worked great with the tile dust mud being washed away and the bit cooled. Using a somewhat medium slow speed and relaxing a little, I holed through in a couple of minutes. Mind you, it is not a fast as a drill press on pine or a sliding wet saw on tile, but I was really happy, somewhat surprised given the amazingly small amount of money these cost. The fact that it did the job and the very low cost is the reason for five stars. The description of the bits is not accurate though. One is 25 mm and the other is 12 mm. This is clearly marked on the items. 25mm equates to about .982 inches as measured and drilled. The other measures about .482. I noticed the 25mm marking on the saw bit when I opened the package and thought that maybe the .4 as in 25.4 mm might have rubbed off. That was not the case. I figured that it was worth a try, drilling the holes and maybe wollowing them out to be big enough, (did not work). Clearly I am not a professional, just a do it yourself hacker that likes to get really low cost tools for my one time projects. The plastic package says one inch and 1/2 inch bits. Of course anyone can print a label. Probably not a big deal in a lot of cases, but my shower rod measures one inch / 25.4 mm so the 18 thousandths/.4mm is bad.My apologies to those premium and "normal" tool makers and sellers for not buying one of yours. I solved the problem by ordering a (low cost) 30mm and sending a note to Amazon to correct the listing. Naturally I added other items in order to get the add-on price and free shipping and I do not have the correct bit to make a 30mm template. Back to my hack shop.Five stars stay. Thanks Amazon. 5Well worth the money for drilling wine bottlesOrdered this set of diamond dust encrusted hole bits to cut holes in wine bottles (and add Xmas lights through the hole). They cut perfectly fine holes quickly, and work great on regular wine bottles, but the essential ingredient is WATER to reduce heat and friction, or you will fracture the glass on the third try and wear off the diamond dust. Here's a nice tip that I found works quite well--take a small sponge, cut a hole in the center to allow the hole drill bit to protrude through, soak the sponge in water in water, and drill through the center of it into a stabilzed bottle while squeezing the sponge. I stabilized the wine bottle on a thick wet towel in a plastic tray. Took less than 10 seconds per bottle to drill a perfect hole through. The secret is the water!!! But you don't have to soak the entire bottle, just the spot you're drilling. However, it's a bit more grueling cutting through thicker glass as it heats up quickly. Easier with the wider bit to insert lights, but both worked. I drilled a Pierre Ferrand cognac bottle without enough water, and the diamond dust came off and the bit was worthless after that. For the amount of money for this set, you can't go wrong if you do it correctly, and the wine bottles with Xmas lights in them look fantastic (did a dozen thus far) and I'm giving them as gifts (holiday and non-holiday)--I use a string of 35 clear (and for Xmas multicolored)lights which fit into any size wine bottle nicely. Bought them off the shelf anywhere. Now, you can buy a Hitachi or DeWalt single diamond bit for $30 each, and I just did so (at Lowes) because I'm into production making these gifts for all of our family and friends and didn't have time to submit another order (still drilling but I have to keep drinking the wine to empty the bottles--small sacrifice. But don't drill after drinking the wine :>I would definitely order these again! Great delivery time, too. One last thing, you do get glass dust, and the glass plug in the bottle. Just rinse off, and the plug can be removed through the drill hole. Then dry thoroughly (I use a hair dryer) before inserting the strand of xmas lights. 5
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Reviews

Customer Reviews

Great bits!After reading the positive reviews on these bits, I decided to give them a try on a little project. I just bought a house with some very outdated lighting pendants. I wanted to replace them, but saw that the glass orb pendants I wanted would cost several hundred dollars. I figured I could just replace the old looking pendant covers with my own glass orbs. I went to Walmart and found some round glass vases that were exactly what I was looking for. They were only $2 each, so it wouldn't cost much to give it a try. I bought 3 of them and drilled a hole in the bottom of each one using the larger diamond hole saw bit. I did this in my kitchen sink while running a small stream of water from the faucet over the area being drilled. It took about 20-30 minutes for each piece, but the end result was worth it. Instead of spending over $200-$300 for some new glass orb pendants, I spent about $6 for the glass bowls and about $6 for the drill bits!I'm very happy with these bits. They did exactly as advertised and were a good price. As far as I'm concerned, they already paid for themselves with the savings I just got from not having to buy new pendants! I would definitely recommend these to anyone who needs to cut a hole in glass. 5How to use tips I am using this to drill through glazed ceramic flower pots to allow water to pass through and I would like to include a few tips being that everyone else has already said how great these hole saws cut.Being a hole saw without a pilot drill, follow these tips for cutting on a slippery surface: 1) Begin drilling on an angle until the surface has been scratched enough to hold the hole saw in place. Don't try an force the drill straight down from the angled cut, but slowing bring it square with the surface.2) no special oils are required, simply use any vegetable oil by dipping the drill bit in the oil every few seconds or when the surface begins to appear dry. vegetable oil may also be applied to the groove if it is the preferred method. Be creative and keep the drill wet.Some have mentioned that the larger bit is difficult to use,, once again, hold the drill on an angle to scratch surface. Yes, the drill may jump a little, but eventually the groove will appear and you can slowly begin squaring off the drill. The groove will hold it in place as the drill is brought upright. - adjust RPM's to find the best speed.I will try and post a video for additional info. 5How to Drill Drainage Holes in Ceramic Flower PotsThese are awesome! I had a lot of very pretty ceramic and terra cotta flower pots with no drain holes, and no matter what I did, the roots would rot and they would stink. I got these bits, drilled holed in the bottoms and now I can use all my pretty pots! I find a lot of great clearance deals too, as people pass by the pots without holes, but since I can drill my own, no worries! It is super easy, and I've done at least a dozen now, so here are some tips if you are leery about trying this yourself:1. Pick a practice pot first, don't start with Great Grandma's antique tea pot.2. Go outside or in the garage, as there will be chalky water sprayed around. Put on some safety or sun glasses so it doesn't get in your eyes.3. Turn your pot upside down. Decide how many holes, how big, (which bit) and where. Mark with sharpie if needed. Just don't put holes too close together, as the area in between the holes will be weak, you don't want the whole bottom the break open. Same goes for the edges, don't go too close to the outside edges. I try to keep about an inch of ceramic intact around my holes, even more, on larger pots.4. Be sure to drill wet- put a little water on the surface where you are drilling so it doesn't get too hot. Sometimes I put the pot upside down in a pail of water just deep enough so the bottom of the pot is barely under water, or if the pot has an indentation on the bottom, I just pour some water in there. You don't need a lot, just have the surface covered, 1/2" is plenty. Since I do this outside, I just keep the hose next to me so I can add more water as needed.5. Hold the bit snug against the bottom of the pot with the bit tipped just slightly to the side, not totally flush, this is so just the side/edge of the bit can dig a little groove to get you started. This is especially important if bottom is glazed and slippery or if the pot is delicate.6. Start slow, and let the bit do most of the work. If your drill has a fast and slow setting, turn it to slow.7. Once you have cut thru the glaze (if any) and have a little groove started, this will help keep your bit in place for the rest of the job. Gradually turn the drill straight so your bit is straight up and down, and gradually drill through. Add more water if needed.8. Don't press really hard but at the same time, you need a firm grip on the drill, and you need to gradually apply pressure so you drill thru the pot. Depending on how thick the ceramic is, you might need to put your weight into it a little. You will get the hang of it quickly. I do this on my knees with the pot on the ground or in a pail of water sitting on the ground, so I can feel totally in control of the situation.9. Pay attention to how close you are getting to breaking thru, because once you do, it will be sudden, and you will need to stop applying pressure immediately or you might pitch forward and crash thru the bottom of your pot with your whole drill.10. Gently pull the drill up out of the hole. There will be a ceramic plug (the piece you drilled out) either stuck inside the bit, or under the pot. If it is stuck inside the bit, just tap the side of the bit against something hard, and it will fall out.11. Admire your handiwork, and start planting! 5Worked great for drilling holes in wine bottlesWorked great for drilling holes in wine bottles.Recommendation:Place to 2 x 4's parallel on a flat surface.Cover wood with a towel. This now makes a cradle to hold the bottles.Make a ring or doughnut out of clay or plumbers putty and place that over the intended hole site.Fill the ring with some water to cool the saw.IMPORTANT: You must use water to cool the bit our you will ruin it with just a couple of cuts.Place your saw in your drill and set it to slow speed.Start with the drill at a bout a 45 degree angle and let the edge of the drill bit cut a small groove in the glass.Slowly tip the drill to the vertical position all the while keeping it spinning at a slow speed.Once vertical you can increase the speed and finish the hole.Sand the edges and insert your lights.HAVE FUN 5One Way to Keep the Saw from "Walking" as You Start Your HoleThese diamond hole saws work very well. A problem some people mentioned is the difficulty in getting the cut started without the saw "walking" across the surface they are trying to cut. I needed to drill bathroom-wall tile to install grab bars. Before I began drilling the tile, I cut a 1" hole in a 3/4" thick board that was about 3" W x 6" L). Then I sanded the hole to make it slightly bigger so the 1" saw would just barely pass through it easily. When I was ready to drill the tile, I put the guide-board flat on the tile, centering its hole over where I wanted the hole in the tile. Then I held it tightly against the wall, put the hole saw through it and against the tile, and then began drilling at a very slow speed to cut the tile. Once the cut was well started, I removed the board and finished cutting the hole in the tile without it. It was not hard to hold the board in place while making the initial cut (if need be, one could position the guide-board with duct tape until they have the saw blade through and against the tile, then they could also hold the board in place with their free hand after they had the saw in place, just before they were ready to begin drilling). I drilled 6 holes through the tile, and this method eliminated "walking" without much effort at all. Remember to run the drill at very slow RPM (after I had my initial cut and removed the board, I used water to keep the bit cool). Go slow, be safe, good luck.6/16/2016 UPDATE. I tried making the template I described in my original post from a 4x8" piece of cardboard box instead of wood. I cut the hole through the cardboard with the same size hole saw I was going to use. I just held the cardboard firmly against the bathroom tile as I started the drill with the other hand. Start drilling very slowly, and soon you will have a perfect circle started, deep enough that you can stop using the cardboard. Be sure to pour water over the tile at the cutting end of the hole saw repeatedly to keep it cool and sharp.... plus it eliminates the dust. (I was installing a grab bar through ceramic wall-tiles and the plaster wall behind the tiles.) 5READ PLEASE! AWESOME PRODUCT!I use these to drill through glass flower vases and wine bottles. The first project was piping through a 1/2" thick vase to use as a candle holder. I marked my cut with black permanent marker. I put the vase in my kitchen sink and let the water trickle on where the cut was going to be. On a very slow speed and with the 1" bit I held the bit steady with my hand on the vase and the upper part of the bit. This thing cut through like a hot knife through butter. The bits are holding up Awesome. I would definitely recommend them to a friend. If this review helped you please vote my review as helpful. 5BEWARE! Not the sizes listed!BEWARE! Not the sizes listed in the description!!! I bought this set specifically because it was the only one I saw that had the 2-3/4" drill, which I specifically needed. When the kit arrived, it was the part # ordered but the largest size drill was 2-3/8"! And the sizes of the other drills were not as listed--some were and some weren't. A second specific size I needed was also NOT in the kit (1-3/4", which is a very common size for drains). The drills are also less than 1-1/4" deep, which means they will not drill through much of the granite slabs out there. This ruined my entire weekend and project. Amazon customer service agents didn't speak English well enough to understand that it wasn't missing parts but rather that the parts in it were not as advertised, and they simply wanted to send me another one. It would appear that all the kits are this way as a bigger drill will not fit in this box. The sizes I received were 2-3/8", 2", 1-1/2", 1-3/8", 1-1/4", 1", 3/4", 1/2", 3/8", 1/4". I had to order just the drills I needed individually at much higher cost and Amazon sent them to me "next day" and I received them 3 days later. Worst Amazon experience ever. Not sure what is going in there, but it definitely did not feel like I was dealing with "The Earth's Most Customer-Centric Company" as they claim they're building. 1SE Diamond Hole SawI use these bits to cut holes in wine bottles (the wife puts lights in them as a craft) and they work fairly well for this purpose. I used to use the spade bits, but ended up breaking 50% of the bottles I tried to cut. The hole saws not only cut faster/easier, they dropped the breakage rate down to about 25%. So why three stars? These are just "OK" quality. After about 3 or 4 bottles, the effectiveness dwindles rapidly. After 6 or so, they are pretty much spent. I'm guessing this may be par for the course with regard to longevity; I just figured the glass vs. diamond/steel battle would last a little longer. The price is spot-on, so if you just need to do one or two cuts, you can't beat 'em!Some words to the wise:1. Make sure the item you are cutting is secure, and start your cut at a 30-degree angle. Don't move the bit until you have cut a C-shaped "seat", as this will keep the edge from skipping all over the place.2. Use water during your cuts. Heat is one of the major culprits in cracking glass/ceramics, and the water will act as a coolant and a lubricant to minimize damage. As many know, introducing cold water to hot glass spells disaster, so START your cut using water.3. Be patient. Forcing your cuts will result in breakage more often than not. If the cut is too slow, it's probably time to replace the tool.4. As another review mentioned, these don't fit in a Dremel tool collet, so if that is your tool of choice, keep looking.5. These work best with an AC-powered hand drill or a full-sized drill press. Cordless drills generally don't produce the torque and RPMs these hole saws need. Your milage may vary...The bottom line is that I will continue to buy these on an as-needed basis, but don't feel they are anything to write home about. 3Great saw bits-low cost-size is not accurateThe large bit is great, I used it to drill two holes in glazed ceramic tile to mount a shower curtain rod. The rod needs to go into the wall, not just up to the surface. I made a locating template with 1/4 inch plywood and a one inch hole in the center and duct taped it to the tile. Masking tape is not the answer for this. As other reviewers advised, I used a wet sponge to drip a stream of water on the wall above the cutter as I drilled. This worked great with the tile dust mud being washed away and the bit cooled. Using a somewhat medium slow speed and relaxing a little, I holed through in a couple of minutes. Mind you, it is not a fast as a drill press on pine or a sliding wet saw on tile, but I was really happy, somewhat surprised given the amazingly small amount of money these cost. The fact that it did the job and the very low cost is the reason for five stars. The description of the bits is not accurate though. One is 25 mm and the other is 12 mm. This is clearly marked on the items. 25mm equates to about .982 inches as measured and drilled. The other measures about .482. I noticed the 25mm marking on the saw bit when I opened the package and thought that maybe the .4 as in 25.4 mm might have rubbed off. That was not the case. I figured that it was worth a try, drilling the holes and maybe wollowing them out to be big enough, (did not work). Clearly I am not a professional, just a do it yourself hacker that likes to get really low cost tools for my one time projects. The plastic package says one inch and 1/2 inch bits. Of course anyone can print a label. Probably not a big deal in a lot of cases, but my shower rod measures one inch / 25.4 mm so the 18 thousandths/.4mm is bad.My apologies to those premium and "normal" tool makers and sellers for not buying one of yours. I solved the problem by ordering a (low cost) 30mm and sending a note to Amazon to correct the listing. Naturally I added other items in order to get the add-on price and free shipping and I do not have the correct bit to make a 30mm template. Back to my hack shop.Five stars stay. Thanks Amazon. 5Well worth the money for drilling wine bottlesOrdered this set of diamond dust encrusted hole bits to cut holes in wine bottles (and add Xmas lights through the hole). They cut perfectly fine holes quickly, and work great on regular wine bottles, but the essential ingredient is WATER to reduce heat and friction, or you will fracture the glass on the third try and wear off the diamond dust. Here's a nice tip that I found works quite well--take a small sponge, cut a hole in the center to allow the hole drill bit to protrude through, soak the sponge in water in water, and drill through the center of it into a stabilzed bottle while squeezing the sponge. I stabilized the wine bottle on a thick wet towel in a plastic tray. Took less than 10 seconds per bottle to drill a perfect hole through. The secret is the water!!! But you don't have to soak the entire bottle, just the spot you're drilling. However, it's a bit more grueling cutting through thicker glass as it heats up quickly. Easier with the wider bit to insert lights, but both worked. I drilled a Pierre Ferrand cognac bottle without enough water, and the diamond dust came off and the bit was worthless after that. For the amount of money for this set, you can't go wrong if you do it correctly, and the wine bottles with Xmas lights in them look fantastic (did a dozen thus far) and I'm giving them as gifts (holiday and non-holiday)--I use a string of 35 clear (and for Xmas multicolored)lights which fit into any size wine bottle nicely. Bought them off the shelf anywhere. Now, you can buy a Hitachi or DeWalt single diamond bit for $30 each, and I just did so (at Lowes) because I'm into production making these gifts for all of our family and friends and didn't have time to submit another order (still drilling but I have to keep drinking the wine to empty the bottles--small sacrifice. But don't drill after drinking the wine :>I would definitely order these again! Great delivery time, too. One last thing, you do get glass dust, and the glass plug in the bottle. Just rinse off, and the plug can be removed through the drill hole. Then dry thoroughly (I use a hair dryer) before inserting the strand of xmas lights. 5
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