• Rokinon FE8M-N 8mm F3.5 Fisheye Fixed Lens for Nikon (Black)
  • Rokinon FE8M-N 8mm F3.5 Fisheye Fixed Lens for Nikon (Black)
  • Rokinon FE8M-N 8mm F3.5 Fisheye Fixed Lens for Nikon (Black)
  • Rokinon FE8M-N 8mm F3.5 Fisheye Fixed Lens for Nikon (Black)
  • Rokinon FE8M-N 8mm F3.5 Fisheye Fixed Lens for Nikon (Black)
Rokinon FE8M-N 8mm F3.5 Fisheye Fixed Lens for Nikon (Black)
Rokinon FE8M-N 8mm F3.5 Fisheye Fixed Lens for Nikon (Black)
Rokinon FE8M-N 8mm F3.5 Fisheye Fixed Lens for Nikon (Black)
Rokinon FE8M-N 8mm F3.5 Fisheye Fixed Lens for Nikon (Black)
Rokinon FE8M-N 8mm F3.5 Fisheye Fixed Lens for Nikon (Black)

Rokinon FE8M-N 8mm F3.5 Fisheye Fixed Lens for Nikon (Black)

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MRP: €286,00
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€476,00
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( 39% off )
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  • B002LTWDSK
  • 180 degrees angle of view
  • Built-in petal type hood
  • 10 Elements in 7 groups
  • Aperture range of F/3.5 ~ 22. NOTE: To ensure proper fit with your compatible device, please set camera to manual mode and the aperture must be changed on the lens itself.

Customer Reviews

Amazing photos that can be achieved ! Excellent for the price . Bought it for my Nikon d3400 and work well SO FAR. Just need to get use to of the manual focus. Lenses itself feel good , made well , has some weight on it . Will give an update latter.So far ,pros : well made, amazing pictures , good price , compatible with d3400 Nikon . Cons: only manual focus and M setting, need some play time to get use to of the focus. Is hard something to tell if you are on focus when using your live view finder. 5Best of the "affordable" Fisheyes I've found Fisheye lenses are very fun - they give a totally different perspective compared to just about any lens out there. The most common type seem to be the "circle" type, which product a big circle in the center of your image (with the fisheye image inside of that). On digital cameras with a crop-factor (like the Canon Rebel series, XXD series and even 7D), this can sometimes result in what looks like a circle with the top and bottom cut off.. not the most enjoyable image.That's where this one comes in - the Rokinon produced a rectangular fisheye image - there is no "circle" as with other types of fisheye lenses, but you still get that great fisheye look (distortions and all).You might see other similar looking (and priced) Fisheye lenses available out there.. Bower, Pro-Optic, Samyang, Rokinon, Vivitar, Falcon. These are ALL THE SAME LENS - Samyang, the manufacturer, simply re-brands it and changes the colors a bit (For example, look at: Vivitar - Fisheye lens - 7 mm - f/3.5 - Canon EF Pro-Optic 8mm f/3.5 Manual Focus, Fish Eye Lens with Canon EOS Mount ). With that said, be sure to check out the others to find the most affordable. The Rokinon is often 50-75 dollars less than the Vivitar.The lens is a Canon EF mount (I only mention this because it's not listed in the description, only that it's "For Canon" - I wasn't sure if it was EF or FD mount before ordering). It WILL fit onto any EF Mount (meaning it will work on a 5D) but because it's SO WIDE, the hood will show up in images on a fullframe camera (it will not show up on images on a 1.6x crop camera like the Rebels, 7D or XXD line). The hood is not removable, but some people actually cut it off to use with full-frame cameras like the 5D.The lens is rounded like a traditional fisheye, so you cannot use lens filter in front of this.The angle is VERY WIDE - probably 180 degrees.. I have the lenscap on a leash (capkeeper) and it shows up in images if I don't move it. Things right to the side of the lens will appear in the photo.. it's hard to hide from it!The low price comes because the lens does NOT make electrical contact with the camera. It's a MANUAL LENS - there is no autofocus, and the camera will not recognize it as a lens. You change the aperture by turning the manual aperture ring on the lens itself. You focus using the larger ring. Since the lens is so wide, if you set it to infinity (on the focus scale), then bring it back to just before that mark, most of your image will be in focus. It's actually tougher to get stuff out of focus than in focus (great for those like me who can't manual focus at all)If you set your camera to AV mode (haven't tried the others) it will automatically determine exposure for you (I was worried about this, figuring a manual lens had to be set manually (including exposure)) - You can, of course, still set it manually. And while it does meter, it's not always perfect so be sure to review your images once in a while to make sure everything is turning out. One of the problems is that with such a wide angle of view, there can often be very different lighting conditions. Taking a photo indoors, for example, will often result in a darkened room and very bright light sources wherever windows are. You almost need to "HDR" these to get usable images. Outdoors or in even lighting conditions, it works great.The price is much less than other wide angle lenses (because those have name-brands behind them and features like autofocus and probably better optics). The only cheaper alternative are the poor screw-on fisheye filters that attach on top of an existing lens, but these will often produce near unusable photos. The photos from the Rokinon are surprisingly sharp.The downside to it is that quality control on the distance-scale can be poor - a number of people are reporting getting this lens (or the other rebranded variations) with a distance scale that is "off" - meaning that the 2 foot mark might actually be "Infinity", but I think it is something you can learn to deal with after a few uses. It doesn't make the lens unusable by any means.The other negative is that this lens is about 300 bucks for a manual-only lens made by Rokinon (or Samyang, etc..) - that's almost the same as you'd pay for a Canon 50mm 1.4 lens (or similar). With that said though, I still really enjoy it and would re-buy it again if I had to make the choice again. 4Best lens on my budget I agree with positive reviews of construction and image quality. However, for non-pros, toting a dedicated fisheye lens on vacation or nature hikes may not make a lot of sense. Watch out for the temptation to leave it on the camera and starting to see everything in fisheye mode. I just went on vacation to Rome with one of these and my one camera body. I don't like to keep my companions waiting, so I don't swap lenses unless it's a killer shot. I got stuck in fisheye mode quite a lot. I am pretty happy with a lot of my fisheye cityscapes and interior architectural shots, but I missed out for sure. A zoom would have been a lot better, and I'm putting a low-end wide zoom on my wish list.I considered some of those cheapo wide angle converters that screw onto the filter threads. The ability to use the zoom and to put it off/on without exposing the camera insides to the elements make these attractive, but image quality would suffer, and I'd need a tripod indoors for sure (not allowed anywhere interesting).Fisheye distortion is not for everyone, but on the bright side, there are ways to keep it to a minimum if you're not shooting a closeup of a puppy. Be aware of parallel and straight elements -- especially the horizon. Keeping things symmetrical helps. You'll probably want to spend some time with Photoshop. Unfortunately Photoshop cannot de-fish an image completely. You can buy $20 software that might work. Photo stitching software may not reliably stitch 8mm fisheye images unless they are very simple. Put the horizon in the middle and look for a simple foreground and sky. This lens will force you to be creative if nothing else. 4Rokinon 8mm - fish-eye fantastic. --Spoiler at the end of the review--If you are currently using or need a fish-eye lens for your DSLR, then this is it. (Not good for a full-frame like Nikon's FX cameras. Sorry.) I saw this on an Amazon daily deal and thought that it was a steal at $299 for a fish-eye lens. This is a beautiful, sturdy lens and started snapping photos the moment I received it. (FYI-this lens is mfg'd by Samyang in Korea and sold under different brand names like ProOPTIC, Bower, etc...)Currently I have a Nikon D40 and it needs to be set on manual "M" mode. One thing that I didn't know about my D40, it doesn't give you a light meter reading on M mode. You'll have to do trial/error and check the photo on the LCD screen to get the right exposure. (This is a hassle on the camera's part, another reason I'll be upgrading soon.) Manual focus and manual aperture brings it back to old-school mode and to be honest, I kinda missed this direct control technique. One delightfully quirky thing about the Rokinon 8mm, IMHO, is that the lens tends to focus to infinity from nearly any setting, making the focus ring almost useless for distant subjects. Which is fine because you'll concentrate more on getting the right exposure anyway.The pictures are simply stunning. It can capture nearly 180-degrees; I did a self-portrait from only a foot away and the light fixture directly above me was in the photo. Short of blowing up the image to 400% view, the colors and sharpness are great. So if you're needing that fish-eye for your DSLR (non full-frame) this is the only choice.---- So here's the SPOILER... ---If you haven't shot with a fish-eye lens or fish-eye photos aren't part of your current work, you should consider getting an ultrawide like a 11mm to 12mm and up. The fisheye will have that distorted/bubble effect on photos and many photographers may want that. But if it's not part of your current work, then you'll get tired of this novelty within a day or two. This is a highly specific lens for a specialized effect and most photographers will not carry this in their camera bag for day to day use. Ultrawide lenses on the other hand, will keep straight lines straight and have minimal distortion. I've had this for a weekend and I'm going to return it on Monday. I'll save up for an ultrawide lens or better yet, a full-frame camera like the rumored Nikon D600 which will be an "entry-level" FX. 4Very fun and well made lens Excellent build quality. Wish the image was a bit sharper, but I can't complain at this price....Good fisheyes can get very expensive. This is a great lens for vacation. You will take some unforgettable photos. I take this one and my 35mm and that's it. If I need a focal length in between, I just whip out my smartphone. 5Decent lens and reasonable cost I'm no professional photographer but do enjoy using a real camera to take pictures when I care about the quality or want to be a little creative. Have always wanted a fisheye lens to play with but always found the price to be a barrier. This lens I stumbled upon before a European vacation on Amazon priced during a "lightning deal" at $200 was too good to pass up. It's solidly built and worked fine with my Canon T3i. As others have noted it's a manual only lens with no chip allowing it to "talk" with the camera. That said, with this type of lens there's really no focusing, I set my program to Aperature Priority and merely adjusted the F-stop based on ambient lighting and it took nice shots repeatedly. Perfect for panoramic landscape shots and interior spaces. A good value for the money. 4Excellent lens at any price The Rokinon 8mm Fisheye lens is my new favorite. Its sharpness, contrast and color saturation are on par with my 17-40mm canon L series lens which costs three times as much. It has great center and edge to edge sharpness. It has little chromatic abberation or color fringing, which is excellent for such an extreme lens. I'm using mine on a canon T2i camera body and the fact that it is a totally manual lens is hardly noticed. Focus is almost a non-issue on an 8mm lens as its depth of field is usually everything in your picture. All I do is put the camera in aperture priority mode and adjust the aperture on the lens instead of through the camera body. The T2i does a great job of correct exposure with this lens. I noticed a very slight loss of sharpness when shooting at f3.5 but that is totally normal for very wide angle lenses shot wide open. I noticed that the lens controls flairing very well and has an excellent build quality. I am so glad I purchased this lens instead of the much more expensive Sigma or Canon fisheye. Finally, with the lens being totally manual, there is less to go wrong with it so it should last a lifetime. 5Not sure you get what you pay for with this one This lens is just barely "okay" in both feature and quality. It's really a one-hit-wonder; if you want to take landscape wide-angle during the daylight with the focus set to infinity, it does an okay job. If you want to do anything else, you'll struggle. The (NOT)auto-focus is neanderthal in design; you turn the focus until you get an led in the viewfinder. It reminds me of the Nikon F1 exposure meter. This design is very inaccurate and there is no way to verify focus through the lens. You can literally turn the focus ring a couple degrees left or right and the light stays on.It does take an "okay" wide-angle landscape, there's minimal vignetting, but definitely some blurring on the outer edges of the shot. It certainly isn't anything special and is somewhat disappointing. For the money, it should be more adaptable and provide a better quality photo. 3High performance/price ratio very well done for first time user or just play for fun. I am not professional photographer, so, for such a lens, I won't select manufacture's 8mm lens due to the price. I believe in ordinary usage, fisheye lens is not the lens you always put on your DSLR. Usually, the lens put on my DSLR is 24-70mm or 24-105mm. This lens meets all my requirements and have reasonable price and quality. Have it and have more fun to take picture.--------UPDATES ON 02/10/2014---------------------I have this lens for a while, purchased in 2012, put my initial review at the end of 2013. Just put an updates on here, I am still very happy with this lens so far. Compare with the image quality and price, this one is a must have equipment if you really like to have a different photo experience. Again, during quite a long time I saw people ask question about how to use this lens. I would like to share my settings when I use it. I am currently using SONY A-99, so this only work on that, but other brand DSLR might have similar settings.1. When you mount this lens on, 2 settings need to change. (1) Should allow release shutter when there is no lens detected. Why? because this is a full manual operation lens, no auto focus, no auto adjustment on aperture. (2) Turn on APS-C mode. Default setting on A-99 is auto, you should put it on "ON" option, because this will set your camera working in APS-C mode, not full frame mode. This lens only support APS-C size sensor, otherwise you will have dark corners on your picture.2. As mentioned a lot of time, this lens only works in full manual mode. So don't forget to selet that mode on your mode dial.Then, you can have fun with it. 5Nice FishEye Lens for the Price The Rokinon is made by Samyang, a Korean lens manufacturer. Samyang makes lens for other 3rd party lens, particularly manual focus lens. This lens is also manual focus which isn't a big deal since it's a fisheye lens. There's a AE chip specifically for Nikon which allows it to connect to the auto exposure programs, including S,A, and P modes. With the chip, it also give you focus confirmation. I was wondering if it was worth the extra $40 for the chip, but I can give it a big YES.This lens is pretty sharp. No issues even wide open at f3.5, indoors or outside. I've taken pictures directly into the sunlight, and get minimal flare. Colors seem vibrant, maybe a little too much, and focus is relatively easy for a fisheye. Just set it at 1 foot and forget it. It'll be pretty much in focus from 9"-infinity.The lens is well built, and fairly hefty. Everything looks and feels first class, like or better than most 3rd party lens. Focusing is smooth, and exposure is interesting due to the ultra-wide angle and capture of a larger field of vision. The only thing I've noticed is that it doesn't have a depth of field scale which would be handy for hyperfocus, and it doesn't have a serial number. I can't complain since this is 1/3 the cost of a comparable fisheye by Sigma or Nikon and used on special occasions.I'd highly recommend this lens for it's sharpness, build, quality, functionality (with the AE chip), and cost. 5
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Reviews

Customer Reviews

Amazing photos that can be achieved ! Excellent for the price . Bought it for my Nikon d3400 and work well SO FAR. Just need to get use to of the manual focus. Lenses itself feel good , made well , has some weight on it . Will give an update latter.So far ,pros : well made, amazing pictures , good price , compatible with d3400 Nikon . Cons: only manual focus and M setting, need some play time to get use to of the focus. Is hard something to tell if you are on focus when using your live view finder. 5Best of the "affordable" Fisheyes I've found Fisheye lenses are very fun - they give a totally different perspective compared to just about any lens out there. The most common type seem to be the "circle" type, which product a big circle in the center of your image (with the fisheye image inside of that). On digital cameras with a crop-factor (like the Canon Rebel series, XXD series and even 7D), this can sometimes result in what looks like a circle with the top and bottom cut off.. not the most enjoyable image.That's where this one comes in - the Rokinon produced a rectangular fisheye image - there is no "circle" as with other types of fisheye lenses, but you still get that great fisheye look (distortions and all).You might see other similar looking (and priced) Fisheye lenses available out there.. Bower, Pro-Optic, Samyang, Rokinon, Vivitar, Falcon. These are ALL THE SAME LENS - Samyang, the manufacturer, simply re-brands it and changes the colors a bit (For example, look at: Vivitar - Fisheye lens - 7 mm - f/3.5 - Canon EF Pro-Optic 8mm f/3.5 Manual Focus, Fish Eye Lens with Canon EOS Mount ). With that said, be sure to check out the others to find the most affordable. The Rokinon is often 50-75 dollars less than the Vivitar.The lens is a Canon EF mount (I only mention this because it's not listed in the description, only that it's "For Canon" - I wasn't sure if it was EF or FD mount before ordering). It WILL fit onto any EF Mount (meaning it will work on a 5D) but because it's SO WIDE, the hood will show up in images on a fullframe camera (it will not show up on images on a 1.6x crop camera like the Rebels, 7D or XXD line). The hood is not removable, but some people actually cut it off to use with full-frame cameras like the 5D.The lens is rounded like a traditional fisheye, so you cannot use lens filter in front of this.The angle is VERY WIDE - probably 180 degrees.. I have the lenscap on a leash (capkeeper) and it shows up in images if I don't move it. Things right to the side of the lens will appear in the photo.. it's hard to hide from it!The low price comes because the lens does NOT make electrical contact with the camera. It's a MANUAL LENS - there is no autofocus, and the camera will not recognize it as a lens. You change the aperture by turning the manual aperture ring on the lens itself. You focus using the larger ring. Since the lens is so wide, if you set it to infinity (on the focus scale), then bring it back to just before that mark, most of your image will be in focus. It's actually tougher to get stuff out of focus than in focus (great for those like me who can't manual focus at all)If you set your camera to AV mode (haven't tried the others) it will automatically determine exposure for you (I was worried about this, figuring a manual lens had to be set manually (including exposure)) - You can, of course, still set it manually. And while it does meter, it's not always perfect so be sure to review your images once in a while to make sure everything is turning out. One of the problems is that with such a wide angle of view, there can often be very different lighting conditions. Taking a photo indoors, for example, will often result in a darkened room and very bright light sources wherever windows are. You almost need to "HDR" these to get usable images. Outdoors or in even lighting conditions, it works great.The price is much less than other wide angle lenses (because those have name-brands behind them and features like autofocus and probably better optics). The only cheaper alternative are the poor screw-on fisheye filters that attach on top of an existing lens, but these will often produce near unusable photos. The photos from the Rokinon are surprisingly sharp.The downside to it is that quality control on the distance-scale can be poor - a number of people are reporting getting this lens (or the other rebranded variations) with a distance scale that is "off" - meaning that the 2 foot mark might actually be "Infinity", but I think it is something you can learn to deal with after a few uses. It doesn't make the lens unusable by any means.The other negative is that this lens is about 300 bucks for a manual-only lens made by Rokinon (or Samyang, etc..) - that's almost the same as you'd pay for a Canon 50mm 1.4 lens (or similar). With that said though, I still really enjoy it and would re-buy it again if I had to make the choice again. 4Best lens on my budget I agree with positive reviews of construction and image quality. However, for non-pros, toting a dedicated fisheye lens on vacation or nature hikes may not make a lot of sense. Watch out for the temptation to leave it on the camera and starting to see everything in fisheye mode. I just went on vacation to Rome with one of these and my one camera body. I don't like to keep my companions waiting, so I don't swap lenses unless it's a killer shot. I got stuck in fisheye mode quite a lot. I am pretty happy with a lot of my fisheye cityscapes and interior architectural shots, but I missed out for sure. A zoom would have been a lot better, and I'm putting a low-end wide zoom on my wish list.I considered some of those cheapo wide angle converters that screw onto the filter threads. The ability to use the zoom and to put it off/on without exposing the camera insides to the elements make these attractive, but image quality would suffer, and I'd need a tripod indoors for sure (not allowed anywhere interesting).Fisheye distortion is not for everyone, but on the bright side, there are ways to keep it to a minimum if you're not shooting a closeup of a puppy. Be aware of parallel and straight elements -- especially the horizon. Keeping things symmetrical helps. You'll probably want to spend some time with Photoshop. Unfortunately Photoshop cannot de-fish an image completely. You can buy $20 software that might work. Photo stitching software may not reliably stitch 8mm fisheye images unless they are very simple. Put the horizon in the middle and look for a simple foreground and sky. This lens will force you to be creative if nothing else. 4Rokinon 8mm - fish-eye fantastic. --Spoiler at the end of the review--If you are currently using or need a fish-eye lens for your DSLR, then this is it. (Not good for a full-frame like Nikon's FX cameras. Sorry.) I saw this on an Amazon daily deal and thought that it was a steal at $299 for a fish-eye lens. This is a beautiful, sturdy lens and started snapping photos the moment I received it. (FYI-this lens is mfg'd by Samyang in Korea and sold under different brand names like ProOPTIC, Bower, etc...)Currently I have a Nikon D40 and it needs to be set on manual "M" mode. One thing that I didn't know about my D40, it doesn't give you a light meter reading on M mode. You'll have to do trial/error and check the photo on the LCD screen to get the right exposure. (This is a hassle on the camera's part, another reason I'll be upgrading soon.) Manual focus and manual aperture brings it back to old-school mode and to be honest, I kinda missed this direct control technique. One delightfully quirky thing about the Rokinon 8mm, IMHO, is that the lens tends to focus to infinity from nearly any setting, making the focus ring almost useless for distant subjects. Which is fine because you'll concentrate more on getting the right exposure anyway.The pictures are simply stunning. It can capture nearly 180-degrees; I did a self-portrait from only a foot away and the light fixture directly above me was in the photo. Short of blowing up the image to 400% view, the colors and sharpness are great. So if you're needing that fish-eye for your DSLR (non full-frame) this is the only choice.---- So here's the SPOILER... ---If you haven't shot with a fish-eye lens or fish-eye photos aren't part of your current work, you should consider getting an ultrawide like a 11mm to 12mm and up. The fisheye will have that distorted/bubble effect on photos and many photographers may want that. But if it's not part of your current work, then you'll get tired of this novelty within a day or two. This is a highly specific lens for a specialized effect and most photographers will not carry this in their camera bag for day to day use. Ultrawide lenses on the other hand, will keep straight lines straight and have minimal distortion. I've had this for a weekend and I'm going to return it on Monday. I'll save up for an ultrawide lens or better yet, a full-frame camera like the rumored Nikon D600 which will be an "entry-level" FX. 4Very fun and well made lens Excellent build quality. Wish the image was a bit sharper, but I can't complain at this price....Good fisheyes can get very expensive. This is a great lens for vacation. You will take some unforgettable photos. I take this one and my 35mm and that's it. If I need a focal length in between, I just whip out my smartphone. 5Decent lens and reasonable cost I'm no professional photographer but do enjoy using a real camera to take pictures when I care about the quality or want to be a little creative. Have always wanted a fisheye lens to play with but always found the price to be a barrier. This lens I stumbled upon before a European vacation on Amazon priced during a "lightning deal" at $200 was too good to pass up. It's solidly built and worked fine with my Canon T3i. As others have noted it's a manual only lens with no chip allowing it to "talk" with the camera. That said, with this type of lens there's really no focusing, I set my program to Aperature Priority and merely adjusted the F-stop based on ambient lighting and it took nice shots repeatedly. Perfect for panoramic landscape shots and interior spaces. A good value for the money. 4Excellent lens at any price The Rokinon 8mm Fisheye lens is my new favorite. Its sharpness, contrast and color saturation are on par with my 17-40mm canon L series lens which costs three times as much. It has great center and edge to edge sharpness. It has little chromatic abberation or color fringing, which is excellent for such an extreme lens. I'm using mine on a canon T2i camera body and the fact that it is a totally manual lens is hardly noticed. Focus is almost a non-issue on an 8mm lens as its depth of field is usually everything in your picture. All I do is put the camera in aperture priority mode and adjust the aperture on the lens instead of through the camera body. The T2i does a great job of correct exposure with this lens. I noticed a very slight loss of sharpness when shooting at f3.5 but that is totally normal for very wide angle lenses shot wide open. I noticed that the lens controls flairing very well and has an excellent build quality. I am so glad I purchased this lens instead of the much more expensive Sigma or Canon fisheye. Finally, with the lens being totally manual, there is less to go wrong with it so it should last a lifetime. 5Not sure you get what you pay for with this one This lens is just barely "okay" in both feature and quality. It's really a one-hit-wonder; if you want to take landscape wide-angle during the daylight with the focus set to infinity, it does an okay job. If you want to do anything else, you'll struggle. The (NOT)auto-focus is neanderthal in design; you turn the focus until you get an led in the viewfinder. It reminds me of the Nikon F1 exposure meter. This design is very inaccurate and there is no way to verify focus through the lens. You can literally turn the focus ring a couple degrees left or right and the light stays on.It does take an "okay" wide-angle landscape, there's minimal vignetting, but definitely some blurring on the outer edges of the shot. It certainly isn't anything special and is somewhat disappointing. For the money, it should be more adaptable and provide a better quality photo. 3High performance/price ratio very well done for first time user or just play for fun. I am not professional photographer, so, for such a lens, I won't select manufacture's 8mm lens due to the price. I believe in ordinary usage, fisheye lens is not the lens you always put on your DSLR. Usually, the lens put on my DSLR is 24-70mm or 24-105mm. This lens meets all my requirements and have reasonable price and quality. Have it and have more fun to take picture.--------UPDATES ON 02/10/2014---------------------I have this lens for a while, purchased in 2012, put my initial review at the end of 2013. Just put an updates on here, I am still very happy with this lens so far. Compare with the image quality and price, this one is a must have equipment if you really like to have a different photo experience. Again, during quite a long time I saw people ask question about how to use this lens. I would like to share my settings when I use it. I am currently using SONY A-99, so this only work on that, but other brand DSLR might have similar settings.1. When you mount this lens on, 2 settings need to change. (1) Should allow release shutter when there is no lens detected. Why? because this is a full manual operation lens, no auto focus, no auto adjustment on aperture. (2) Turn on APS-C mode. Default setting on A-99 is auto, you should put it on "ON" option, because this will set your camera working in APS-C mode, not full frame mode. This lens only support APS-C size sensor, otherwise you will have dark corners on your picture.2. As mentioned a lot of time, this lens only works in full manual mode. So don't forget to selet that mode on your mode dial.Then, you can have fun with it. 5Nice FishEye Lens for the Price The Rokinon is made by Samyang, a Korean lens manufacturer. Samyang makes lens for other 3rd party lens, particularly manual focus lens. This lens is also manual focus which isn't a big deal since it's a fisheye lens. There's a AE chip specifically for Nikon which allows it to connect to the auto exposure programs, including S,A, and P modes. With the chip, it also give you focus confirmation. I was wondering if it was worth the extra $40 for the chip, but I can give it a big YES.This lens is pretty sharp. No issues even wide open at f3.5, indoors or outside. I've taken pictures directly into the sunlight, and get minimal flare. Colors seem vibrant, maybe a little too much, and focus is relatively easy for a fisheye. Just set it at 1 foot and forget it. It'll be pretty much in focus from 9"-infinity.The lens is well built, and fairly hefty. Everything looks and feels first class, like or better than most 3rd party lens. Focusing is smooth, and exposure is interesting due to the ultra-wide angle and capture of a larger field of vision. The only thing I've noticed is that it doesn't have a depth of field scale which would be handy for hyperfocus, and it doesn't have a serial number. I can't complain since this is 1/3 the cost of a comparable fisheye by Sigma or Nikon and used on special occasions.I'd highly recommend this lens for it's sharpness, build, quality, functionality (with the AE chip), and cost. 5
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