• Racor - PLB-2R Gravity Bike Rack - Wall Bike Stand
  • Racor - PLB-2R Gravity Bike Rack - Wall Bike Stand
  • Racor - PLB-2R Gravity Bike Rack - Wall Bike Stand
  • Racor - PLB-2R Gravity Bike Rack - Wall Bike Stand
  • Racor - PLB-2R Gravity Bike Rack - Wall Bike Stand
  • Racor - PLB-2R Gravity Bike Rack - Wall Bike Stand
  • Racor - PLB-2R Gravity Bike Rack - Wall Bike Stand
  • Racor - PLB-2R Gravity Bike Rack - Wall Bike Stand
Racor - PLB-2R Gravity Bike Rack - Wall Bike Stand
Racor - PLB-2R Gravity Bike Rack - Wall Bike Stand
Racor - PLB-2R Gravity Bike Rack - Wall Bike Stand
Racor - PLB-2R Gravity Bike Rack - Wall Bike Stand
Racor - PLB-2R Gravity Bike Rack - Wall Bike Stand
Racor - PLB-2R Gravity Bike Rack - Wall Bike Stand
Racor - PLB-2R Gravity Bike Rack - Wall Bike Stand
Racor - PLB-2R Gravity Bike Rack - Wall Bike Stand

Racor - PLB-2R Gravity Bike Rack - Wall Bike Stand

Sale price
MRP: €309,00
Regular price
€514,00
Unit price
per 
( 39% off )
Quantity:
Expected Delivery: 21-28 days
Import Duties to be borne by the customer at the time of delivery.
Product price is exclusive of such duties.

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10 Days Return

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10 Days Return

  • CUSTOMIZABLE - Gravity rack leans against any wall, lightweight and movable.
  • DURABLE - Vinyl coated steel and rubber skids protects bikes, floors and walls.
  • ADJUSTABLE - Independent adjustable holding arms will work with men's and women's bikes.
  • CONVENIENT - Bikes are organized but easily accessible.
  • RECLAIM YOUR GARAGE - Reduce your bike's footprint in your garage, but keep them easily accessible.

Customer Reviews

Not fit for advertised purposeThe item is very badly made. The first hint was that parts of the base didn't fit well and had to be forced together by two adults in order to make the screw holes align. The second hint was when the metal of the beam bent under moderately tightened screws. The bikes are held up by rubber-coated wide hooks on the ends of bars (pipes) that you can insert at different heights. Two of the hooks started coming off after having average weight bikes on them for just a few minutes. They are welded in just two small spots, with top spot breaking easily and the hook then bending while still attached at the bottom spot. I don't trust the rest so now I'm experimenting with using it as a vertical rack of sorts, leaning the bikes against the bars (not the hooks, obviously), with most of the weight on the ground.Other thoughts: the arms are rather long, so the bikes will be at least two feet apart - don't get this if you're trying to save space. That's of course assuming you got a better item that doesn't break under load. The pole comes in two parts, and the way parts are joined together blocks several of the slots in the middle. 1Horrible choice.This completely fell apart. I even took the extra step to bolt to the wall. The unit itself fell apart. The bikes came crashing off the wall and the top bike dented my car. Between the damage to the bikes and car, it was over $1,500. One was a tri-bike and the other a children's bike, so not even heavy bikes. We had another unit holding two other bikes for years that was similar. We went with this one instead of getting a second of the original because it was a little cheaper. Horrible choice......... 1GOOD, WITH ONE DESIGN FLAWThis was one of the weirder birthday gifts I've gotten, but it's handy. Living in an apartment, you make space where you can. My toddlers still mess with the lower bike though they know they're not supposed to, but at least now I'm comfortable that they won't pull a bike over on themselves.You're supposed to anchor this to a wall, but our landlord has rules against such, so we didn't and it works fine. Many visitors think it's a brilliant life-hack for small apartment or garage and ask about it.Our only complaint is that there is nothing to keep the front wheels straight. A simple extra bar or anything would make an easy and needed improvement to the design. Without it, our tires and handlebars regularly swing and bump against the wall both when we are moving the bikes and when our kids are playing where they shouldn't be.Altogether, it's an interesting and useful space saver and keeps bikes from toppling on the kiddos.Hopefully that's helpful. 4poor quality, completely ineffectivepros:5 pieces, should be easy to constructcons:- not easy to construct due to poor quality- holes don't don't line up on the base- vertical poles were bent and the metal sheered when they were connected- after assembly vertical pole was immediately was leaning without any bikes on it- despite all of this! once bikes are precariously loaded, it doesn't actually save any space because the arms are so long. it's the same or wider than 4 bikes lined up next to each other!- there's no way to keep the front wheel from turningsave your money 1Exactly what we needed!I honestly didn't know what to expect. The reviews were mostly good until they weren't. I wasn't sure if it would fit our bikes. I was very pleased. FINALLY the bikes are off the floor and no more having to move them around!It was easy to put together. It has a bit of a wobble but once you put the bikes on it- it stabilizes it really nice. It fits the space well. When I initially assembled it, there was a slight crookedness to it- but that involved the only piece you could actually flip upside down (the lower bar with the key hole attachments). I did flip it and it fit a lot straighter.My garage has about a 3-4" deep cement strip around the bottom, in this spot it's about an inch high- from the foundation. It does not affect the stability at all. Still within the range of how much the base would have protruded anyhow.My bike is a women's hybrid, size small (I'm tall but have very short legs, lol) , my husbands is an XL hybrid frame, neither heavy per say. I had a few concerns. One being, would the absence of the top bar prevent my bike from working on this rack (despite saying it would work for women's bikes). Secondly, if I did get it to "fit" without a straight bar, would the stability be compromised?. Third- did it matter which bike went on bottom or top? Because there was no way I was going to be able to lift down or lift up my bike over my head if mine had to go on the top. I'm tall, but not strong enough for the awkwardness of it.1.) it took some experimenting but we got the right angle and height for the hooks to cradle my bike. I DO think it would be easier if I got one of those temp bars you use for a car rack. But without it- it works. It also helps the little hooks can and do swivel but aren't loose. I would advise to follow the directions and remove the cap and loosen and tighten the screws inside as it directs, so it won't strip the grip of it.2.)It feels very secure without using a straight bar. I initially thought it wasn't going to work but I flipped my bike around so the break wires are on the outside and not as tangle-y into the hook. (not sure if that makes sense)3.) As for which bike is on bottom or top. I was surprised it was more logical to put my husband's on the top. I would think you'd put the heavier (even though not by much) bike on the bottom. But that was just too awkward for me to reach up for my bike as suspected. So we tried his on top. it worked and the rack was surprisingly stable. We were able to get mine on the bottom and I tested the stability and ease of mounting it and dismounting it. I have to be a little more gingerly with it than I probably would have to with a straight top bar but it's doable and I don't feel like it's going to topple down on me with his on top.Very successful! At this time we will not be securing it to the wall. Mostly because this was the only corner we had left and there is a gas pipe in this wall. But we don't have kids and it's well out of the main pathway so it shouldn't impinge any traffic or get bumped and such.I would definitely recommend. I've included a photo. It doesn't look like it but my bike is off the ground and not touching. We also figure if the turned wheel bothers us- we'll get one of those velcro straps to align them so they don't turn.I have no idea why the photo is sideways, it wasn't like that when I took it or uploaded it. 54 Bike Stand- Great Buy!Overall stand is great and holds 4 bikes very well. Currently have 2 women's mountain and 1 men's mountain and road bike. The stand is stable and only has a the normal movement when a bike is taken off. The arms are adjustable so they can be set at different heights and also the ends on the arms rotate. The ends have a thick rubber coating that keeps from damaging the bike frame. I would give it 5 stars but stand was mailed with no hardware so had to make a trip to Home Depot to get the nuts and bolts. I was given a partial refund from Amazon very quick to cover the cost which is one reason I love buying from Amazon. Always great customer service! 4Works great, could use a tweak or twoI actually ordered two of these, because I have four bicycles I need to store. When I installed them in my garage, I think it took me 30 minutes to assemble both (including dragging them from the shipping box to the garage and removing the packaging from the components). I screwed one into the studs of one of my garage walls, and then wound up putting a 2-by piece of wood between two of the studs to give the other a mounting point. One bonus of having not finished off the outside wall of my garage is that the recessed area gave me a couple of inches of extra room for handlebars and pedals.Pros:- Goes together very easily, intuitive set-up. It comes in eight pieces, four of which are support arms for the bicycles. If you look at the packaging, it goes together quickly.- Easy to move if necessary. The stand is very light, which makes it easy to tweak final placement.- Plenty of room for both bicycles. There's plenty of height for you to mount both bikes (I recommend mounting the top first, to gauge how much room you need on the bottom.) and remove them without disturbing the other.Cons:- VERY wobbly--especially vertically. The connections between the four vertical pieces are friction-fit. Kind of. They slide together very easily, but there's a LOT of play in them. The vertical stem of the stand will wobble.- MUST be anchored to wall. Because of how wobbly the stand is, I would NOT feel comfortable just letting this stand free. Especially considering how easily the feet glide across the floor (I mounted this in a bare concrete garage.). Even after mounting it to studs, I plan to drill one hole thru the second vertical piece from the top of the stem, just to ensure stability. The screw that comes with the stand is barely long enough to make me feel good about using it to mount the stand to a wall. I am not confident you could use it to secure the stand to a stud with drywall over it. (The package includes a toggle bolt if you need to mount the stand between studs of a drywalled wall.) I wound up buying a couple of 3 1/2" long 5/16" lag bolts to screw it into the wall.- Caps to cover ends and hide screw points were often loose in the package. This is a minor complaint, but several of the caps used to plug the ends of the U-shaped piece at the bottom of the stand or to cover where the screws holding the support brackets onto the arms were rolling around loose in the package and had to be located during assembly.- An option to order shorter support bars would have been nice. The arms hold the bicycles a considerable distance from the stem, which I know is to ensure the wall isn't dented by your bicycle's handlebars or pedals. But an option for arms that are about 3" shorter would have been nice for mounting it in a space where the walls have no drywall on them.This product really opened up my garage floor, and I'm glad I ordered it. I just wish it were a bit better constructed and had a little bit of flexibility built into it. 35 stars does NOT mean it's perfect. Slight modification is advised.For the price, I have to give this bicycle storage solution 5 stars. I knew most of the caveats to it going in. With regard to the plastic end caps: yes, they are made and fit very poorly. I took a hot glue gun and glued them on. Also, due to another review I read, I decided not to bother with the drywall anchor hardware that came with it. *Especially* not with living in earthquake country. I went down to a hardware store and bought some 3.5" deck screws and secured that sucker to a wall stud. A 4" screw would not have been out of the question as well, but so far the 3.5" screw seems to be securing it sufficiently. I also bought a washer to make sure the screw head wouldn't dive through the hole in the rack. I'm not sure how easy it is to tell in the photo, but the vertical supports are not perfectly aligned with each other due to the presence of more weight on one side than the other. It's not that the pieces themselves are crooked; it's just that the way they fit together allows for a bit of side to side wiggling - yet another reason to secure it to a wall stud. Another small but helpful modification was the addition of some sticky felt pads like one would add to the bottom of a piece of furniture to keep it from scuffing a floor. I stuck the pads at regular intervals on the back of the vertical support to keep the assembly from rubbing on and damaging the wall. Altogether, another 5-8 dollars or so in accessories, assuming one doesn't have any of the items just lying around from another project. Ignoring the time needed to move a bookcase out of the way and buy supplies from the hardware store (another 2-3 hours), it took me about 30 minutes to set up. 5Great Value. Added bonus of functioning as a work stand for your bike.Outstanding value for money. Amazingly it arrived the day after I ordered it too!I use it up against a basement wall, so I didn't have any concerns about it really falling over. It does appear very stable though, even with only one bike on it at the top of the stand.Its solidly built and can be assembled in about 3 minutes (assuming you don't want to bolt it to your wall which I didn't) and most of that is scanning the instructions.The tubes put together in about 30 seconds. They simply slot into each other. They are not square, but slightly rectangular, so they can only go together one way. It really is idiot proof.I like the fact that the arms have soft plastic covers to protect the frame of your bike. The arms also have pivoting ends, so you can angle them to fit the frame of your bike.BONUS: This words great as a work stand for a bike. Simply put the bike on one of the other levels and you can pretty much do most things you would need to do with a bike work stand!You can't beat the price either.I was able to put a road bike and a hybrid bike on it with no problem. 5Woudn't trust it as freestanding, but works well mounted into the wall.A Pretty good two-bike stand. I wouldn't trust it free-standing, but it did successfully hold my ~30lbs Trek Verve 2 on top while I was testing out the positioning and which stud to use. I was looking for a way to mount my and my wife's bikes on the wall to save some garage space when we're not biking, and this fit the bill just right.My bike is on top and my wife's step-through frame is on the bottom, pointing in the opposite direction to allow for clearance space between my wheels and her handlebars. Both are hybrid bikes with 700c wheels; 26" Mountain bikes and smaller will probably allow for actually hanging of both bikes, but in this case, my wife's bike is actually only held up by the arms on the crossbar and seat post; her bike's full weight is basically still through the wheels on the ground. Still keeps it out of the way and my bike feels sturdy held up that high.The arms don't have much adjustment other than how high on the center tower to mount them and what angle to turn the "cup" end to match the angles of your bike. I have my bike suspended with one arm on the crossbar near the seat tube and the other on the down tube. My bike has internal wiring, so I put the front arm on the down tube to avoid damaging the rear-brake wire on the crossbar. 4
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Reviews

Customer Reviews

Not fit for advertised purposeThe item is very badly made. The first hint was that parts of the base didn't fit well and had to be forced together by two adults in order to make the screw holes align. The second hint was when the metal of the beam bent under moderately tightened screws. The bikes are held up by rubber-coated wide hooks on the ends of bars (pipes) that you can insert at different heights. Two of the hooks started coming off after having average weight bikes on them for just a few minutes. They are welded in just two small spots, with top spot breaking easily and the hook then bending while still attached at the bottom spot. I don't trust the rest so now I'm experimenting with using it as a vertical rack of sorts, leaning the bikes against the bars (not the hooks, obviously), with most of the weight on the ground.Other thoughts: the arms are rather long, so the bikes will be at least two feet apart - don't get this if you're trying to save space. That's of course assuming you got a better item that doesn't break under load. The pole comes in two parts, and the way parts are joined together blocks several of the slots in the middle. 1Horrible choice.This completely fell apart. I even took the extra step to bolt to the wall. The unit itself fell apart. The bikes came crashing off the wall and the top bike dented my car. Between the damage to the bikes and car, it was over $1,500. One was a tri-bike and the other a children's bike, so not even heavy bikes. We had another unit holding two other bikes for years that was similar. We went with this one instead of getting a second of the original because it was a little cheaper. Horrible choice......... 1GOOD, WITH ONE DESIGN FLAWThis was one of the weirder birthday gifts I've gotten, but it's handy. Living in an apartment, you make space where you can. My toddlers still mess with the lower bike though they know they're not supposed to, but at least now I'm comfortable that they won't pull a bike over on themselves.You're supposed to anchor this to a wall, but our landlord has rules against such, so we didn't and it works fine. Many visitors think it's a brilliant life-hack for small apartment or garage and ask about it.Our only complaint is that there is nothing to keep the front wheels straight. A simple extra bar or anything would make an easy and needed improvement to the design. Without it, our tires and handlebars regularly swing and bump against the wall both when we are moving the bikes and when our kids are playing where they shouldn't be.Altogether, it's an interesting and useful space saver and keeps bikes from toppling on the kiddos.Hopefully that's helpful. 4poor quality, completely ineffectivepros:5 pieces, should be easy to constructcons:- not easy to construct due to poor quality- holes don't don't line up on the base- vertical poles were bent and the metal sheered when they were connected- after assembly vertical pole was immediately was leaning without any bikes on it- despite all of this! once bikes are precariously loaded, it doesn't actually save any space because the arms are so long. it's the same or wider than 4 bikes lined up next to each other!- there's no way to keep the front wheel from turningsave your money 1Exactly what we needed!I honestly didn't know what to expect. The reviews were mostly good until they weren't. I wasn't sure if it would fit our bikes. I was very pleased. FINALLY the bikes are off the floor and no more having to move them around!It was easy to put together. It has a bit of a wobble but once you put the bikes on it- it stabilizes it really nice. It fits the space well. When I initially assembled it, there was a slight crookedness to it- but that involved the only piece you could actually flip upside down (the lower bar with the key hole attachments). I did flip it and it fit a lot straighter.My garage has about a 3-4" deep cement strip around the bottom, in this spot it's about an inch high- from the foundation. It does not affect the stability at all. Still within the range of how much the base would have protruded anyhow.My bike is a women's hybrid, size small (I'm tall but have very short legs, lol) , my husbands is an XL hybrid frame, neither heavy per say. I had a few concerns. One being, would the absence of the top bar prevent my bike from working on this rack (despite saying it would work for women's bikes). Secondly, if I did get it to "fit" without a straight bar, would the stability be compromised?. Third- did it matter which bike went on bottom or top? Because there was no way I was going to be able to lift down or lift up my bike over my head if mine had to go on the top. I'm tall, but not strong enough for the awkwardness of it.1.) it took some experimenting but we got the right angle and height for the hooks to cradle my bike. I DO think it would be easier if I got one of those temp bars you use for a car rack. But without it- it works. It also helps the little hooks can and do swivel but aren't loose. I would advise to follow the directions and remove the cap and loosen and tighten the screws inside as it directs, so it won't strip the grip of it.2.)It feels very secure without using a straight bar. I initially thought it wasn't going to work but I flipped my bike around so the break wires are on the outside and not as tangle-y into the hook. (not sure if that makes sense)3.) As for which bike is on bottom or top. I was surprised it was more logical to put my husband's on the top. I would think you'd put the heavier (even though not by much) bike on the bottom. But that was just too awkward for me to reach up for my bike as suspected. So we tried his on top. it worked and the rack was surprisingly stable. We were able to get mine on the bottom and I tested the stability and ease of mounting it and dismounting it. I have to be a little more gingerly with it than I probably would have to with a straight top bar but it's doable and I don't feel like it's going to topple down on me with his on top.Very successful! At this time we will not be securing it to the wall. Mostly because this was the only corner we had left and there is a gas pipe in this wall. But we don't have kids and it's well out of the main pathway so it shouldn't impinge any traffic or get bumped and such.I would definitely recommend. I've included a photo. It doesn't look like it but my bike is off the ground and not touching. We also figure if the turned wheel bothers us- we'll get one of those velcro straps to align them so they don't turn.I have no idea why the photo is sideways, it wasn't like that when I took it or uploaded it. 54 Bike Stand- Great Buy!Overall stand is great and holds 4 bikes very well. Currently have 2 women's mountain and 1 men's mountain and road bike. The stand is stable and only has a the normal movement when a bike is taken off. The arms are adjustable so they can be set at different heights and also the ends on the arms rotate. The ends have a thick rubber coating that keeps from damaging the bike frame. I would give it 5 stars but stand was mailed with no hardware so had to make a trip to Home Depot to get the nuts and bolts. I was given a partial refund from Amazon very quick to cover the cost which is one reason I love buying from Amazon. Always great customer service! 4Works great, could use a tweak or twoI actually ordered two of these, because I have four bicycles I need to store. When I installed them in my garage, I think it took me 30 minutes to assemble both (including dragging them from the shipping box to the garage and removing the packaging from the components). I screwed one into the studs of one of my garage walls, and then wound up putting a 2-by piece of wood between two of the studs to give the other a mounting point. One bonus of having not finished off the outside wall of my garage is that the recessed area gave me a couple of inches of extra room for handlebars and pedals.Pros:- Goes together very easily, intuitive set-up. It comes in eight pieces, four of which are support arms for the bicycles. If you look at the packaging, it goes together quickly.- Easy to move if necessary. The stand is very light, which makes it easy to tweak final placement.- Plenty of room for both bicycles. There's plenty of height for you to mount both bikes (I recommend mounting the top first, to gauge how much room you need on the bottom.) and remove them without disturbing the other.Cons:- VERY wobbly--especially vertically. The connections between the four vertical pieces are friction-fit. Kind of. They slide together very easily, but there's a LOT of play in them. The vertical stem of the stand will wobble.- MUST be anchored to wall. Because of how wobbly the stand is, I would NOT feel comfortable just letting this stand free. Especially considering how easily the feet glide across the floor (I mounted this in a bare concrete garage.). Even after mounting it to studs, I plan to drill one hole thru the second vertical piece from the top of the stem, just to ensure stability. The screw that comes with the stand is barely long enough to make me feel good about using it to mount the stand to a wall. I am not confident you could use it to secure the stand to a stud with drywall over it. (The package includes a toggle bolt if you need to mount the stand between studs of a drywalled wall.) I wound up buying a couple of 3 1/2" long 5/16" lag bolts to screw it into the wall.- Caps to cover ends and hide screw points were often loose in the package. This is a minor complaint, but several of the caps used to plug the ends of the U-shaped piece at the bottom of the stand or to cover where the screws holding the support brackets onto the arms were rolling around loose in the package and had to be located during assembly.- An option to order shorter support bars would have been nice. The arms hold the bicycles a considerable distance from the stem, which I know is to ensure the wall isn't dented by your bicycle's handlebars or pedals. But an option for arms that are about 3" shorter would have been nice for mounting it in a space where the walls have no drywall on them.This product really opened up my garage floor, and I'm glad I ordered it. I just wish it were a bit better constructed and had a little bit of flexibility built into it. 35 stars does NOT mean it's perfect. Slight modification is advised.For the price, I have to give this bicycle storage solution 5 stars. I knew most of the caveats to it going in. With regard to the plastic end caps: yes, they are made and fit very poorly. I took a hot glue gun and glued them on. Also, due to another review I read, I decided not to bother with the drywall anchor hardware that came with it. *Especially* not with living in earthquake country. I went down to a hardware store and bought some 3.5" deck screws and secured that sucker to a wall stud. A 4" screw would not have been out of the question as well, but so far the 3.5" screw seems to be securing it sufficiently. I also bought a washer to make sure the screw head wouldn't dive through the hole in the rack. I'm not sure how easy it is to tell in the photo, but the vertical supports are not perfectly aligned with each other due to the presence of more weight on one side than the other. It's not that the pieces themselves are crooked; it's just that the way they fit together allows for a bit of side to side wiggling - yet another reason to secure it to a wall stud. Another small but helpful modification was the addition of some sticky felt pads like one would add to the bottom of a piece of furniture to keep it from scuffing a floor. I stuck the pads at regular intervals on the back of the vertical support to keep the assembly from rubbing on and damaging the wall. Altogether, another 5-8 dollars or so in accessories, assuming one doesn't have any of the items just lying around from another project. Ignoring the time needed to move a bookcase out of the way and buy supplies from the hardware store (another 2-3 hours), it took me about 30 minutes to set up. 5Great Value. Added bonus of functioning as a work stand for your bike.Outstanding value for money. Amazingly it arrived the day after I ordered it too!I use it up against a basement wall, so I didn't have any concerns about it really falling over. It does appear very stable though, even with only one bike on it at the top of the stand.Its solidly built and can be assembled in about 3 minutes (assuming you don't want to bolt it to your wall which I didn't) and most of that is scanning the instructions.The tubes put together in about 30 seconds. They simply slot into each other. They are not square, but slightly rectangular, so they can only go together one way. It really is idiot proof.I like the fact that the arms have soft plastic covers to protect the frame of your bike. The arms also have pivoting ends, so you can angle them to fit the frame of your bike.BONUS: This words great as a work stand for a bike. Simply put the bike on one of the other levels and you can pretty much do most things you would need to do with a bike work stand!You can't beat the price either.I was able to put a road bike and a hybrid bike on it with no problem. 5Woudn't trust it as freestanding, but works well mounted into the wall.A Pretty good two-bike stand. I wouldn't trust it free-standing, but it did successfully hold my ~30lbs Trek Verve 2 on top while I was testing out the positioning and which stud to use. I was looking for a way to mount my and my wife's bikes on the wall to save some garage space when we're not biking, and this fit the bill just right.My bike is on top and my wife's step-through frame is on the bottom, pointing in the opposite direction to allow for clearance space between my wheels and her handlebars. Both are hybrid bikes with 700c wheels; 26" Mountain bikes and smaller will probably allow for actually hanging of both bikes, but in this case, my wife's bike is actually only held up by the arms on the crossbar and seat post; her bike's full weight is basically still through the wheels on the ground. Still keeps it out of the way and my bike feels sturdy held up that high.The arms don't have much adjustment other than how high on the center tower to mount them and what angle to turn the "cup" end to match the angles of your bike. I have my bike suspended with one arm on the crossbar near the seat tube and the other on the down tube. My bike has internal wiring, so I put the front arm on the down tube to avoid damaging the rear-brake wire on the crossbar. 4
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