• OSOYOO Due R3 32 Bit ARM Compatible Shield Module Board with USB Cable (Compatible with Arduino)
  • OSOYOO Due R3 32 Bit ARM Compatible Shield Module Board with USB Cable (Compatible with Arduino)
  • OSOYOO Due R3 32 Bit ARM Compatible Shield Module Board with USB Cable (Compatible with Arduino)
  • OSOYOO Due R3 32 Bit ARM Compatible Shield Module Board with USB Cable (Compatible with Arduino)
  • OSOYOO Due R3 32 Bit ARM Compatible Shield Module Board with USB Cable (Compatible with Arduino)
  • OSOYOO Due R3 32 Bit ARM Compatible Shield Module Board with USB Cable (Compatible with Arduino)
  • OSOYOO Due R3 32 Bit ARM Compatible Shield Module Board with USB Cable (Compatible with Arduino)
OSOYOO Due R3 32 Bit ARM Compatible Shield Module Board with USB Cable (Compatible with Arduino)
OSOYOO Due R3 32 Bit ARM Compatible Shield Module Board with USB Cable (Compatible with Arduino)
OSOYOO Due R3 32 Bit ARM Compatible Shield Module Board with USB Cable (Compatible with Arduino)
OSOYOO Due R3 32 Bit ARM Compatible Shield Module Board with USB Cable (Compatible with Arduino)
OSOYOO Due R3 32 Bit ARM Compatible Shield Module Board with USB Cable (Compatible with Arduino)
OSOYOO Due R3 32 Bit ARM Compatible Shield Module Board with USB Cable (Compatible with Arduino)
OSOYOO Due R3 32 Bit ARM Compatible Shield Module Board with USB Cable (Compatible with Arduino)

OSOYOO Due R3 32 Bit ARM Compatible Shield Module Board with USB Cable (Compatible with Arduino)

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  • The Arduino Due is a microcontroller board based on the Atmel SAM3X8E ARM Cortex-M3 CPU (datasheet)
  • It is the first Arduino board based on a 32-bit ARM core microcontroller
  • The board contains everything needed to support the microcontroller; simply connect it to a computer with a micro-USB cable or power it with a AC-to-DC adapter or battery to get started
  • The bootloader is preburned in factory from Atmel and is stored in a dedicated ROM memory. The available SRAM is 96KB in two contiguous bank of 64KB and 32KB. All the available memory (Flash, RAM and ROM) can be accessed directly as a flat addressing space
  • It is possible to erase the Flash memory of the SAM3X with the onboard erase button. This will remove the currently loaded sketch from the MCU. To erase, press and hold the Erase button for a few seconds while the board is powered

Customer Reviews

What is this? A microcontroller made for ants???? So far it works perfectly. Note that I have done a bunch of arduino stuff on my computer before this so I may already have drivers that other people don't have installed.Connected to my computerOpened Arduino IDE and loaded Blink sketchSet board to Leonardo and selected the appropriate COM port (It showed up in the list already identified as a Leonardo)Connected an LED to pin 9 and modified the sketch accordinglyHit upload and within a few seconds I had a blinking LEDNote that for some reason the onboard red Rx LED keeps flashing even after the upload, not sure why. I unplugged it from the computer and connected to the battery pack I used for charging my phone on the go and it started back up with no issues and without the red light blinking. So it does appear to be getting some sort of continuous data signal when plugged into my computer which is odd, but doesn't seem to actually be a problem.The pinout appears to match the sparkfun pro micro board for which I've attached the diagram. EDIT: I just realized that the pins with the white circles around them are the PWM pins. 5Like some other reviewers Like some other reviewers, my Pro Micro seemed to be losing the sketch when disconnected from power. However, I've now figured out that the Pro Micro isn't actually losing the sketch, there is a different problem altogether. When the Pro Micro is reconnected to power, for some reason the bootloader isn't running the sketch. If you then do a soft-reset by connecting the RST pin to ground, upon reset the bootloader starts running the sketch successfully.So the issue can be worked around by wiring a button to the RST pin and hitting the button every time you plug in the Pro Micro so that it will reset and run the sketch. It's annoying that the issue exists, but at least it's workable. 3Requires reset button press to boot to main application on the Cortex M3 processor instead of the bootloader -- as recommended o Expected a cheap clone Due board, and got exactly that. Requires reset button press to boot to main application on the Cortex M3 processor instead of the bootloader -- as recommended on several forum threads, a 10k resistor soldered across a FET on the board resolves this problem. That matches later schematics for the genuine Arduino board. Not sure I'd recommend this board unless you are comfortable soldering and/or don't mine mashing the reset button in your application. 3Its like a DUE but not a DUE I have 7 computers all running windows 10. I have one running 2, 3D printers. One running a circuit board router,I have employees operating 4 desktops.I m using my laptop.I put the most updated version of Arduino IDE Software.I tried your DUE on all my machines.None of my machines will see your board.I have read some of your answers to questions.Its like a DUE but not a DUE?Don t advertise it as a DUE if its not one!!I just want to send it back . 1Windows 7 will automatically install the WRONG driver. This knock-off Nano will get detected by Windows 7 but will install the wrong driver making you think everything is ready to go. Don't get fooled by that. Thank you to Richard DeMar who posted a link to the driver. It allowed me to get my Nano working. Yeah the domain name is a bit sketchy but you don't need to use the included Install.EXE. Once you download and unzip it just go to device manager and manually install it. This Nano will NOT work without this driver on Windows 7!!! Nano is pre-loaded with the default blink sketch. It will blink forever without the correct driver because you can't connect to it or upload a new sketch. All of the comments here were awesome and got me up and running. I really wish they would have included the driver on a mini-CD or at least a link to it in the description. I wasted a good amount of time trying to figure out why this Nano wasn't working out of the box.Using this to control 2 WS2182B LED light strips. Works great! Requires an external power source to use with more than about 15 LED's. It simply doesn't have the power to drive more than a few LED's using its own USB power. I hooked up an external wall wart 5V/2A and voila. Works perfectly with FastLED+Bambilight or FastLED+PaletteKnife. There's no need to purchase expensive driver modules for your 5V WS2182B LED light strip project. This Nano is controlling 2x 16ft light strips. As long as you aren't pulling more amps than your power supply can handle this will do the job beautifully as a controller.Also another good idea is getting a buck converter so you can use a 9v or 12v power supply that it will step down to 5v to power this. Use with barrel terminals and you can power your projects with a wide assortment of different power supplies laying around.HOW TO USE A NANO AS A WS2812B LIGHT STRIP CONTROLLER:Use thick wire, I used 22 gauge. There is a great breakout board available for the nano I highly recommend getting that for convenience. It has screw terminals so you won't need to solder as much. Hook up the Nano's GND and D3 pin to the GND and DI on the light strip. You only want it to control ground switching and data addressing. Hook up your 5V/2A male 2.1mm barrel type wall wart to the 5v+ and GND of the light strip using a female barrel terminal adapter. The light strip will share the GND of the power supply and nano (common ground). So the GND on the light strip should have 2 wires to it, one from the nano and one from the power supply. That's all the hardware you need to setup. The DI pad only appears on a WS2812B strip every 15 LED's. You cannot just hook it up to any solder joint on the WS2812B it must be on a DI pad not DO pad. If you screw up really bad and accidentally desolder any of the pads for the DI junction you didn't just lose 1 light, you have to cut 15 off until you see the next DI pad. Learn from my mistake. ;) Ensure you have the right driver. Open the Arudino IDE, set your COM port. Download the FastLED library. Load up one of the examples from file>examples>fastled. Define the DATA_PIN as 3, define the LED_TYPE as WS2812B and watch the pretty lights. So pretty!UPDATE: Purchased this in 2016. Now in 2019 and it's still powering my LED strip daily. 2 full WS2812B strips are about 270 LED's. I screwed up a few times and now down to 240 LED's before I got it right. :) Runs a little over 4V and around 1A depending on the color animation. Full white will draw the most load close to 2 amps. Nano + WS2812B + FastLED library = awesome. 5Excellent board copy of SparkFun Pro Micro - 5V/16MHz -- may wish to use different settings from OSOYOO's recommendation. Board works great. I did not have any difficulties that I could not resolve.Changing my recommendation to use the "Leonardo" board definition. This avoids all problems I had, don't need to download new definition. Only missing 5 pins that are on the Leonardo -- so just don't use those. Also use the macros for RX and TX LED, as pin 13 is one of the missing pins and so is the extra (active high) LED.----------- Original review: -------------That said, I gave 4 stars only due to documentation short comings.This board is electrically a duplicate of the SparkFun Pro Micro - 5V/16MHz, except the RXLED and TXLED (at least on my board) are both red color, and the power LED is green. And the bootloader shows as an Arduino Mini -- which is confusing but works.I use the latest Arduino system on Windows 10, which seemed to then have all driver issues resolved and did not need to download any drivers.I did use the Arduino facility to download the SparkFun board definitions for the "Pro Micro" which has different pin definitions than the recommended Leonardo. (Leonardo should work, but has pin definition problems.)BE ESPECIALLY CAREFUL if you use the "Pro Micro" board setup that when selecting the board type YOU ALSO set the processor selection on a separate menu item to "ATmega32U4 (5V, 16MHz)". Failure to do so will make the board appear to stop working. (Then a complex and tricky sequence of resetting using reset pin and uploading with correct settings within the special 8 second window must be done to reload the board so it will work after the 8 second boot delay elapses.)Other issues are related to and similar to the same issues with the Pro Micro itself, and the Leonardo. This board has the special advantage that the user can feed very fast data through USB, and can simultaneously output data on the RX,TX serial port to another process. I found this especially useful in communicating with a different system using serial data. 4I used this not for Arduino Leonardo related projects, ... I used this not for Arduino Leonardo related projects, but instead flashed in concert with a CP2104 for use as a GIM-X adapter in order to use my Logitech G27 steering wheel peripheral on Playstation 4. In this regard, it worked perfectly. What I appreciated most is that this board comes with the headers unsoldered.As far as applications- beyond my specific use scenario, this is essentially a Pro Micro version of the Arduino Leonardo. The reason you would use this over a vanilla ATMEGA328P based Arduino Pro Micro or Uno R3 is because the 32U4 can act as a USB controller (whereas the 328P uses a separate ATMEGA16U2 chip as a USB-serial adapter... or even a CH340 in cheaper Chinese clones). So you would use this type of board if you wanted to make a USB input device for your computer, for example. If you are just doing Arduino based projects without needing this extra capability, 328P Arduinos can be found for much cheaper. 5Beware startup bug When powered up and running, it seems to work. However the "running" part is the problem. The board I got suffered from a problem where it would not run code when power is initially applied. Only after a reset will the code start to run. This is not acceptable to me, I need my code to run when the board is under power at all times. Evidently this is a relatively common problem with clones, and I could not find any solid cause/solution that I wanted to bother with. If you need a Due, be wary of clones. Returned. 1not bad for the price one DOA, other two worked. Quality needs to be checked prior to use. Considering the 50% markup of 2/3 working, not bad for the price.As for USB driver issues, windows *will install the wrong driver. Follow the shady link, download package. Use window's manual driver update option in device manager. When windows ask for driver directory direct it to look in the ~/CH341SER/ folder, *not ~/INSTALL/.Do NOT use the included .exe's in the driver packages. Though they likely don't contain viruses, they are poorly written installation programs, and not only will it fail to install the drivers, it will change your registry and inhibit windows from installing the driver if you look for the file manually later (this makes window's think a driver is already installed). If this happens to you, you need to search through your registry and remove ALL traces of CH341SER and CH340 before trying to install the driver again - manually. 3Completely Worthless This is a completely worthless clone of the Sparkfun Pro Micro. On windows 10, this board was recognized as an Arduino Leonardo (it uses the same MPU), but the arduino IDE was not able to upload a sketch. After installing the sparkfun avr support package, and setting the arduino IDE to point towards the sparkfun pro micro, the board was completely bricked. I'm assuming the assembly of this board is faulty, or it is not using the genuine AT chip (the ATmega32U4). Don't waste your money on this, and instead buy an Arduino Leonardo, or buy the device manufactured and sold by sparkfun. This thing isn't even heavy enough to be a paper weight, so it us utterly useless. 1
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Reviews

Customer Reviews

What is this? A microcontroller made for ants???? So far it works perfectly. Note that I have done a bunch of arduino stuff on my computer before this so I may already have drivers that other people don't have installed.Connected to my computerOpened Arduino IDE and loaded Blink sketchSet board to Leonardo and selected the appropriate COM port (It showed up in the list already identified as a Leonardo)Connected an LED to pin 9 and modified the sketch accordinglyHit upload and within a few seconds I had a blinking LEDNote that for some reason the onboard red Rx LED keeps flashing even after the upload, not sure why. I unplugged it from the computer and connected to the battery pack I used for charging my phone on the go and it started back up with no issues and without the red light blinking. So it does appear to be getting some sort of continuous data signal when plugged into my computer which is odd, but doesn't seem to actually be a problem.The pinout appears to match the sparkfun pro micro board for which I've attached the diagram. EDIT: I just realized that the pins with the white circles around them are the PWM pins. 5Like some other reviewers Like some other reviewers, my Pro Micro seemed to be losing the sketch when disconnected from power. However, I've now figured out that the Pro Micro isn't actually losing the sketch, there is a different problem altogether. When the Pro Micro is reconnected to power, for some reason the bootloader isn't running the sketch. If you then do a soft-reset by connecting the RST pin to ground, upon reset the bootloader starts running the sketch successfully.So the issue can be worked around by wiring a button to the RST pin and hitting the button every time you plug in the Pro Micro so that it will reset and run the sketch. It's annoying that the issue exists, but at least it's workable. 3Requires reset button press to boot to main application on the Cortex M3 processor instead of the bootloader -- as recommended o Expected a cheap clone Due board, and got exactly that. Requires reset button press to boot to main application on the Cortex M3 processor instead of the bootloader -- as recommended on several forum threads, a 10k resistor soldered across a FET on the board resolves this problem. That matches later schematics for the genuine Arduino board. Not sure I'd recommend this board unless you are comfortable soldering and/or don't mine mashing the reset button in your application. 3Its like a DUE but not a DUE I have 7 computers all running windows 10. I have one running 2, 3D printers. One running a circuit board router,I have employees operating 4 desktops.I m using my laptop.I put the most updated version of Arduino IDE Software.I tried your DUE on all my machines.None of my machines will see your board.I have read some of your answers to questions.Its like a DUE but not a DUE?Don t advertise it as a DUE if its not one!!I just want to send it back . 1Windows 7 will automatically install the WRONG driver. This knock-off Nano will get detected by Windows 7 but will install the wrong driver making you think everything is ready to go. Don't get fooled by that. Thank you to Richard DeMar who posted a link to the driver. It allowed me to get my Nano working. Yeah the domain name is a bit sketchy but you don't need to use the included Install.EXE. Once you download and unzip it just go to device manager and manually install it. This Nano will NOT work without this driver on Windows 7!!! Nano is pre-loaded with the default blink sketch. It will blink forever without the correct driver because you can't connect to it or upload a new sketch. All of the comments here were awesome and got me up and running. I really wish they would have included the driver on a mini-CD or at least a link to it in the description. I wasted a good amount of time trying to figure out why this Nano wasn't working out of the box.Using this to control 2 WS2182B LED light strips. Works great! Requires an external power source to use with more than about 15 LED's. It simply doesn't have the power to drive more than a few LED's using its own USB power. I hooked up an external wall wart 5V/2A and voila. Works perfectly with FastLED+Bambilight or FastLED+PaletteKnife. There's no need to purchase expensive driver modules for your 5V WS2182B LED light strip project. This Nano is controlling 2x 16ft light strips. As long as you aren't pulling more amps than your power supply can handle this will do the job beautifully as a controller.Also another good idea is getting a buck converter so you can use a 9v or 12v power supply that it will step down to 5v to power this. Use with barrel terminals and you can power your projects with a wide assortment of different power supplies laying around.HOW TO USE A NANO AS A WS2812B LIGHT STRIP CONTROLLER:Use thick wire, I used 22 gauge. There is a great breakout board available for the nano I highly recommend getting that for convenience. It has screw terminals so you won't need to solder as much. Hook up the Nano's GND and D3 pin to the GND and DI on the light strip. You only want it to control ground switching and data addressing. Hook up your 5V/2A male 2.1mm barrel type wall wart to the 5v+ and GND of the light strip using a female barrel terminal adapter. The light strip will share the GND of the power supply and nano (common ground). So the GND on the light strip should have 2 wires to it, one from the nano and one from the power supply. That's all the hardware you need to setup. The DI pad only appears on a WS2812B strip every 15 LED's. You cannot just hook it up to any solder joint on the WS2812B it must be on a DI pad not DO pad. If you screw up really bad and accidentally desolder any of the pads for the DI junction you didn't just lose 1 light, you have to cut 15 off until you see the next DI pad. Learn from my mistake. ;) Ensure you have the right driver. Open the Arudino IDE, set your COM port. Download the FastLED library. Load up one of the examples from file>examples>fastled. Define the DATA_PIN as 3, define the LED_TYPE as WS2812B and watch the pretty lights. So pretty!UPDATE: Purchased this in 2016. Now in 2019 and it's still powering my LED strip daily. 2 full WS2812B strips are about 270 LED's. I screwed up a few times and now down to 240 LED's before I got it right. :) Runs a little over 4V and around 1A depending on the color animation. Full white will draw the most load close to 2 amps. Nano + WS2812B + FastLED library = awesome. 5Excellent board copy of SparkFun Pro Micro - 5V/16MHz -- may wish to use different settings from OSOYOO's recommendation. Board works great. I did not have any difficulties that I could not resolve.Changing my recommendation to use the "Leonardo" board definition. This avoids all problems I had, don't need to download new definition. Only missing 5 pins that are on the Leonardo -- so just don't use those. Also use the macros for RX and TX LED, as pin 13 is one of the missing pins and so is the extra (active high) LED.----------- Original review: -------------That said, I gave 4 stars only due to documentation short comings.This board is electrically a duplicate of the SparkFun Pro Micro - 5V/16MHz, except the RXLED and TXLED (at least on my board) are both red color, and the power LED is green. And the bootloader shows as an Arduino Mini -- which is confusing but works.I use the latest Arduino system on Windows 10, which seemed to then have all driver issues resolved and did not need to download any drivers.I did use the Arduino facility to download the SparkFun board definitions for the "Pro Micro" which has different pin definitions than the recommended Leonardo. (Leonardo should work, but has pin definition problems.)BE ESPECIALLY CAREFUL if you use the "Pro Micro" board setup that when selecting the board type YOU ALSO set the processor selection on a separate menu item to "ATmega32U4 (5V, 16MHz)". Failure to do so will make the board appear to stop working. (Then a complex and tricky sequence of resetting using reset pin and uploading with correct settings within the special 8 second window must be done to reload the board so it will work after the 8 second boot delay elapses.)Other issues are related to and similar to the same issues with the Pro Micro itself, and the Leonardo. This board has the special advantage that the user can feed very fast data through USB, and can simultaneously output data on the RX,TX serial port to another process. I found this especially useful in communicating with a different system using serial data. 4I used this not for Arduino Leonardo related projects, ... I used this not for Arduino Leonardo related projects, but instead flashed in concert with a CP2104 for use as a GIM-X adapter in order to use my Logitech G27 steering wheel peripheral on Playstation 4. In this regard, it worked perfectly. What I appreciated most is that this board comes with the headers unsoldered.As far as applications- beyond my specific use scenario, this is essentially a Pro Micro version of the Arduino Leonardo. The reason you would use this over a vanilla ATMEGA328P based Arduino Pro Micro or Uno R3 is because the 32U4 can act as a USB controller (whereas the 328P uses a separate ATMEGA16U2 chip as a USB-serial adapter... or even a CH340 in cheaper Chinese clones). So you would use this type of board if you wanted to make a USB input device for your computer, for example. If you are just doing Arduino based projects without needing this extra capability, 328P Arduinos can be found for much cheaper. 5Beware startup bug When powered up and running, it seems to work. However the "running" part is the problem. The board I got suffered from a problem where it would not run code when power is initially applied. Only after a reset will the code start to run. This is not acceptable to me, I need my code to run when the board is under power at all times. Evidently this is a relatively common problem with clones, and I could not find any solid cause/solution that I wanted to bother with. If you need a Due, be wary of clones. Returned. 1not bad for the price one DOA, other two worked. Quality needs to be checked prior to use. Considering the 50% markup of 2/3 working, not bad for the price.As for USB driver issues, windows *will install the wrong driver. Follow the shady link, download package. Use window's manual driver update option in device manager. When windows ask for driver directory direct it to look in the ~/CH341SER/ folder, *not ~/INSTALL/.Do NOT use the included .exe's in the driver packages. Though they likely don't contain viruses, they are poorly written installation programs, and not only will it fail to install the drivers, it will change your registry and inhibit windows from installing the driver if you look for the file manually later (this makes window's think a driver is already installed). If this happens to you, you need to search through your registry and remove ALL traces of CH341SER and CH340 before trying to install the driver again - manually. 3Completely Worthless This is a completely worthless clone of the Sparkfun Pro Micro. On windows 10, this board was recognized as an Arduino Leonardo (it uses the same MPU), but the arduino IDE was not able to upload a sketch. After installing the sparkfun avr support package, and setting the arduino IDE to point towards the sparkfun pro micro, the board was completely bricked. I'm assuming the assembly of this board is faulty, or it is not using the genuine AT chip (the ATmega32U4). Don't waste your money on this, and instead buy an Arduino Leonardo, or buy the device manufactured and sold by sparkfun. This thing isn't even heavy enough to be a paper weight, so it us utterly useless. 1
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