• OP/TECH USA 9001252 Rainsleeve - Mega, 2-Pack (Clear)
  • OP/TECH USA 9001252 Rainsleeve - Mega, 2-Pack (Clear)
  • OP/TECH USA 9001252 Rainsleeve - Mega, 2-Pack (Clear)
  • OP/TECH USA 9001252 Rainsleeve - Mega, 2-Pack (Clear)
OP/TECH USA 9001252 Rainsleeve - Mega, 2-Pack (Clear)
OP/TECH USA 9001252 Rainsleeve - Mega, 2-Pack (Clear)
OP/TECH USA 9001252 Rainsleeve - Mega, 2-Pack (Clear)
OP/TECH USA 9001252 Rainsleeve - Mega, 2-Pack (Clear)

OP/TECH USA 9001252 Rainsleeve - Mega, 2-Pack (Clear)

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MRP: €37,20
Regular price
€62,00
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per 
( 40% off )
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Expected Delivery: 21-28 days
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Product price is exclusive of such duties.

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  • Designed for handheld use or tripod application
  • Compact design fits easily in a bag or pocket
  • Unique eyepiece opening adapts to most viewfinders for viewing through the lens - not plastic!
  • Camera and lens controls are easily visible and operable
  • Fits any camera/lens configuration up to 8" (20, 3 cm) in diameter and up to 25" (63, 5 cm) long

Customer Reviews

works as expected & then some with tweaks These are not designed to make your camera/lens waterproof. But they do offer excellent protection against mud, dust, rain, mist, and splash. I shoot the marketing & promo shots for all the major mud obstacle runs across the country and use these to cover 2 cameras (one with a 70-200 & one with a 14-24) as well as my Profoto B1. They save my gear in the ridiculous amounts of mud that gets sloshed all over everything, and even in heavy downpours. However, there's a caveat. If you expect hard rain, these won't work as is. They're really not designed for heavy rain (and don't claim to be). Waterproof housings are the only sure-fire way to protect gear, but I've learned to gaf tape and rubber-band these to the ends of lens barrels, and around my B1. I've shot dozens of mud events and other outdoor shoots in heavy downpours (go to facebook for Tough Mudder and look at the 2018 Dallas event album to see the rain in which I was shooting) and get home, unwrap my gear, and it's spotless. The built-in drawstring is kinda' worthless (hence 4 stars instead of 5). I usually tie it off, snip the extra string, gaf tape it to the bottom of the lens hood, and rubber-band it just behind where the lens hood attaches to the lens barrel. Works like a charm. 4Sturdy enough and well made to protect your gear from rain and snow. Pros:Works well with my 7DII plus grip and 70-200mm f/2.8 lens in landscape orientation, even with the lens' tripod foot attached to a monopod. The opening for the viewfinder attaches between the camera and the camera's eyepiece cover. It may take you a couple of tries to get everything lined up well so that the eyepiece cover stays attached. Be sure and check to be sure it won't fall off and get lost! The cover keeps everything nice and dry, even in a downpour.Cons:There's just not enough room to use it in portrait orientation with the grip, keep the eye hole over the viewfinder, the lens attached to the monopod and keep the opening for my hands pointed down.The main reason for the grip is to have the extra set of controls for portrait orientation. Sigh.If you are the DIY type there is a workaround: Use Mailing Carton Sealing Tape Clear 3.0mil - 1PC - 1.89 in x 55 yds M to cover the built in hole and carefully cut your own hole to the side so that it lines up with your camera in portrait orientation. Pay close attention to the eyepiece cover staying secured as it is now slid on from the side instead of the top. This allows me to use the monopod with the top of the cover still up and the bottom with the hand opening still down.I also use the tape to reinforce around the eyepiece hole and repair any minor nicks to the plastic. If you place the tape against the plastic cover on the inside of the cover, the sticky side will not come in contact with your camera. It's easiest to place the tape so it won't interfere with the eyepiece cover if the both the rain cover and the eyepiece cover are attached to the camera when applying the tape. This allows me to reuse each cover quite a number of times. 4Condensation kept getting inside of bag wet This is a good inexpensive solution for short term use of a camera in rainy conditions, but shooting in June in Canada, it didn't take long for condensation to form on the inside of the bag. It's easy enough to dry the inside with a paper napkin, but that necessitates finding shelter and interrupting shooting.I thought it might be OK to fold the arm opening of the bag around the camera strap and wear the camera around my neck a bit. Bad idea. I couldn't keep water out that way. However, holding it as intended and foregoing use of the neck strap worked fine until the condensation problem got in the way.The first bag has plenty of life left in it after 6-8 hours of use. It's made of thick plastic and well sealed at the seams. The package includes a second bag as well.I agree with the reviewer who said focusing is challenging with the drawstring around the lens. Sometimes I had to loosen, focus, and retighten in the rain.What's not apparent from the photo is how long the bag is. It comes well past my elbow, which is good for preventing rain entry at the arm opening.For an inexpensive, short term solution, I'd buy it again. 3Great way to protect your camera from the rain. Do you really believe your camera manual when it says that the camera is weatherproof? I don't. So what do you do? Well there are high end solutions from companies like ThinkTank and they work very well. But you may not have the several hundred dollars that a full professional solution will cost. Fear not, there is an alternative...These OP/Tech rainsleeves are a great way to protect your camera gear from inclement weather and, to an certain extent, from dust and dirt. They are easy to fit with a drawstring for the lens and a hole to fit over the viewfinder. They are thick enough to protect the camera and lens and thin enough to allow you to operate the controls. These will fit a D500 with a 70 - 200 f/2.8 on it. With a bit of tape they can be made to work with zooms which extend on zooming such as the Tamron 150 - 600 too. They are a bit small for a pro body like a D4 though.These are a great solution for travel and other emergency needs. If you've got a $12k lens then you really should use the professional solutions but for everyone else give these a try and always keep a couple of these in your camera bag. One day they may save your gear. 5Cheap, But Perfect! I just got back from Iceland, and these were PERFECT for the weather! I bought them on a whim, but we walked all around waterfalls, got rained and snowed on a lot, and I never had to worry once about my camera or lenses that I had in these. Sure, they look ridiculous, but I can't tell you how many other people commented to me that they wished they had thought of this before going there. The bags even come with a small hole in them (didn't even notice until someone pointed it out), which worked great for attaching your tripod! I bought four of them total, and gave the others to my photo workshop friends to use, and they loved them too. No problem with ripping or tearing at all, and highly recommend for all types of weather! I know I will be using these a lot more, I live in a location with a lot of rain and snow, and they'll come in handy this winter. Only thing to make sure, is to take camera out of the bag once you're out of the rain/snow (and don't detach your lens from your camera while they are inside the bag), as moisture can build up inside of these, and you don't want your camera or lens to get moisture inside of it. Otherwise, couldn't be happier with these! 5Useless: bags come with 2 holes punched on the top Both bags come with 2 holes punched on the top, each of them about 20mm in diameter.These completely ruin the function of the bag as your camera can still get wet if you don't notice those holes getting exposed to the rain.I can accept paying $7 for a pair of plastic bags with drawstring, which is all these are, if they will keep my camera dry when shooting in the rain. These don't even do that.Worth noting that fakespot .com gives reviews for this product a C grade as it thinks only 65% of the reviews are reliable and others may be deceptive.This product is a total waste that could ruin a very expensive camera. 1Small price, big protection. Why buy a nylon DWR coated lens sleeve when you can buy these? The drawback to one of the more hefty wet weather lens sleeves is that you have to keep track of it and store it properly. They are relatively expensive, a bit cumbersome from a size perspective and you have to make sure you dry them out etc when you are not using them. I use these instead. At such a low price per unit I can just throw a couple pouches of them in my camera bag and I m ready for whatever weather happens. I m sure my fellow photographers appreciate it too--I ve bailed friends out while shooting sports when it suddenly rained because I could just hand them one and not worry about getting it back. When done with them, you can simply dry out and reuse them, or dump them. You can buy a lot of these for the price of a pro nylon rain sleeve.Af far as using them, for all but the biggest lenses (like a 200-500mm lens) the original size works fine. I ve used them with a Nikon pro body with a 24-70 lens or a 70-200 lens on a pro body. It can be a bit tight for the long lens but it works fine. I don t try to line up the view hole in the cover with my viewfinder, I simply look through the plastic when shooting.You have to be a little careful with the open bottom end if it s raining hard and you are using a strap like a black rapid, but I don t find it to be a big problem. 4Perfect Size for DSLR with Vacation Telephoto or Prime Lens I wanted something simple and inexpensive that would protect my DSLR from potential water spray while on a boat trip. This thing delivered. I wish the manufacturer would do a better job describing dimensions. I bought both the Original and the Small. I had no problem using the 'Small' on my Sony A77 with both my 18-270mm f/3.5-6.3 telephoto lens and my 16-50mm f/2.8 prime lens. This protector has plenty of room for a full DSLR body, even if you have a battery grip attached. Then, there is 12" of distance between the back of the protector and the hole at the end where the lends peeks out. So, assemble your camera, extend your lens to the fullest. Measure the longest distance (from the backside of the body to front of the lens). If it's within 12" you're good to go. If it's longer (and this means you're doing some serious telephoto work) you'll want something bigger. For most folks with consumer/prosumer equipment this is the one for you. I did find that trying to view my shot with this thing on was a bit of a pain. The plastic is mostly transparent, but not crystal clear (especially after its been crumpled after several uses). And making any setting adjustments, including zooming the lens, could be equally challenging. But assuming you can set and forget things for awhile, you should have no trouble protecting your camera without investing a small fortune for a custom shell. 5Great emergency rain protection - Cheap insurance A very simple and cheap solution that does just what it's intended to do. For a professional looking to go out shooting in rainy conditions all day, every day, a dedicated heavy-duty rain protection system would be recommended, but for 'emergency' rain use, these are great to have. I have been using the Original 18" sleeves on two different cameras when I go wildlife and bird photographing in the Florida wetlands, where rain is an unfortunate possibility almost any day of the year. Often I go for long walks far from shelter or cars and prefer not to haul additional lenses or bags with me, so I'll just bring the camera and mounted lens...these rain sleeves when folded up can easily slip into a back pants pocket and not even be noticed - just a few mm thick and no larger than a wallet's length and width. If I see rain coming, I can get the camera into the sleeve in under 30 seconds, tighten up the front drawstring, and work on mounting the eyepiece over the hole. Sometimes I just skip that step as I can still shoot with the viewfinder even through the plastic - depends on how long I expect the rain to last. I use this sleeve on a medium-sized DSLR with a Tamron 150-600mm lens, and it fits very nicely, even allowing the Tamron full extension at 600mm. I also use this on a much smaller mirrorless camera body with a 70-300mm lens, and it's entirely too big but can still be used in a pinch. I do wish they made a size in between their 'small' 8" model and original 18" model - something like 12" would be perfect for a mirrorless or compact DSLR with a 70-200mm or 70-300mm mid-range zoom. 4Doesn't protect from hard rain. I really don't know what went wrong, but I ended up having to replace my DSLR after thinking this would protect my camera from Iceland rain - NOT. One of the people on the tour pointed out that I had a puddle of water in the rainsleeve after I was out using it on a very windy rainy cold day - I will NEVER again think I can protect my camera with one of these. I had water behind the screen of my camera, water in the battery compartment, and water in the SD card compartment. I wiped it down immediately, put the camera in rice, and my camera still wouldn't turn on. I was told the cost for repairs was equivalent to the price of a comparable new camera, so I ended up having to purchase a new camera. 1
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Reviews

Customer Reviews

works as expected & then some with tweaks These are not designed to make your camera/lens waterproof. But they do offer excellent protection against mud, dust, rain, mist, and splash. I shoot the marketing & promo shots for all the major mud obstacle runs across the country and use these to cover 2 cameras (one with a 70-200 & one with a 14-24) as well as my Profoto B1. They save my gear in the ridiculous amounts of mud that gets sloshed all over everything, and even in heavy downpours. However, there's a caveat. If you expect hard rain, these won't work as is. They're really not designed for heavy rain (and don't claim to be). Waterproof housings are the only sure-fire way to protect gear, but I've learned to gaf tape and rubber-band these to the ends of lens barrels, and around my B1. I've shot dozens of mud events and other outdoor shoots in heavy downpours (go to facebook for Tough Mudder and look at the 2018 Dallas event album to see the rain in which I was shooting) and get home, unwrap my gear, and it's spotless. The built-in drawstring is kinda' worthless (hence 4 stars instead of 5). I usually tie it off, snip the extra string, gaf tape it to the bottom of the lens hood, and rubber-band it just behind where the lens hood attaches to the lens barrel. Works like a charm. 4Sturdy enough and well made to protect your gear from rain and snow. Pros:Works well with my 7DII plus grip and 70-200mm f/2.8 lens in landscape orientation, even with the lens' tripod foot attached to a monopod. The opening for the viewfinder attaches between the camera and the camera's eyepiece cover. It may take you a couple of tries to get everything lined up well so that the eyepiece cover stays attached. Be sure and check to be sure it won't fall off and get lost! The cover keeps everything nice and dry, even in a downpour.Cons:There's just not enough room to use it in portrait orientation with the grip, keep the eye hole over the viewfinder, the lens attached to the monopod and keep the opening for my hands pointed down.The main reason for the grip is to have the extra set of controls for portrait orientation. Sigh.If you are the DIY type there is a workaround: Use Mailing Carton Sealing Tape Clear 3.0mil - 1PC - 1.89 in x 55 yds M to cover the built in hole and carefully cut your own hole to the side so that it lines up with your camera in portrait orientation. Pay close attention to the eyepiece cover staying secured as it is now slid on from the side instead of the top. This allows me to use the monopod with the top of the cover still up and the bottom with the hand opening still down.I also use the tape to reinforce around the eyepiece hole and repair any minor nicks to the plastic. If you place the tape against the plastic cover on the inside of the cover, the sticky side will not come in contact with your camera. It's easiest to place the tape so it won't interfere with the eyepiece cover if the both the rain cover and the eyepiece cover are attached to the camera when applying the tape. This allows me to reuse each cover quite a number of times. 4Condensation kept getting inside of bag wet This is a good inexpensive solution for short term use of a camera in rainy conditions, but shooting in June in Canada, it didn't take long for condensation to form on the inside of the bag. It's easy enough to dry the inside with a paper napkin, but that necessitates finding shelter and interrupting shooting.I thought it might be OK to fold the arm opening of the bag around the camera strap and wear the camera around my neck a bit. Bad idea. I couldn't keep water out that way. However, holding it as intended and foregoing use of the neck strap worked fine until the condensation problem got in the way.The first bag has plenty of life left in it after 6-8 hours of use. It's made of thick plastic and well sealed at the seams. The package includes a second bag as well.I agree with the reviewer who said focusing is challenging with the drawstring around the lens. Sometimes I had to loosen, focus, and retighten in the rain.What's not apparent from the photo is how long the bag is. It comes well past my elbow, which is good for preventing rain entry at the arm opening.For an inexpensive, short term solution, I'd buy it again. 3Great way to protect your camera from the rain. Do you really believe your camera manual when it says that the camera is weatherproof? I don't. So what do you do? Well there are high end solutions from companies like ThinkTank and they work very well. But you may not have the several hundred dollars that a full professional solution will cost. Fear not, there is an alternative...These OP/Tech rainsleeves are a great way to protect your camera gear from inclement weather and, to an certain extent, from dust and dirt. They are easy to fit with a drawstring for the lens and a hole to fit over the viewfinder. They are thick enough to protect the camera and lens and thin enough to allow you to operate the controls. These will fit a D500 with a 70 - 200 f/2.8 on it. With a bit of tape they can be made to work with zooms which extend on zooming such as the Tamron 150 - 600 too. They are a bit small for a pro body like a D4 though.These are a great solution for travel and other emergency needs. If you've got a $12k lens then you really should use the professional solutions but for everyone else give these a try and always keep a couple of these in your camera bag. One day they may save your gear. 5Cheap, But Perfect! I just got back from Iceland, and these were PERFECT for the weather! I bought them on a whim, but we walked all around waterfalls, got rained and snowed on a lot, and I never had to worry once about my camera or lenses that I had in these. Sure, they look ridiculous, but I can't tell you how many other people commented to me that they wished they had thought of this before going there. The bags even come with a small hole in them (didn't even notice until someone pointed it out), which worked great for attaching your tripod! I bought four of them total, and gave the others to my photo workshop friends to use, and they loved them too. No problem with ripping or tearing at all, and highly recommend for all types of weather! I know I will be using these a lot more, I live in a location with a lot of rain and snow, and they'll come in handy this winter. Only thing to make sure, is to take camera out of the bag once you're out of the rain/snow (and don't detach your lens from your camera while they are inside the bag), as moisture can build up inside of these, and you don't want your camera or lens to get moisture inside of it. Otherwise, couldn't be happier with these! 5Useless: bags come with 2 holes punched on the top Both bags come with 2 holes punched on the top, each of them about 20mm in diameter.These completely ruin the function of the bag as your camera can still get wet if you don't notice those holes getting exposed to the rain.I can accept paying $7 for a pair of plastic bags with drawstring, which is all these are, if they will keep my camera dry when shooting in the rain. These don't even do that.Worth noting that fakespot .com gives reviews for this product a C grade as it thinks only 65% of the reviews are reliable and others may be deceptive.This product is a total waste that could ruin a very expensive camera. 1Small price, big protection. Why buy a nylon DWR coated lens sleeve when you can buy these? The drawback to one of the more hefty wet weather lens sleeves is that you have to keep track of it and store it properly. They are relatively expensive, a bit cumbersome from a size perspective and you have to make sure you dry them out etc when you are not using them. I use these instead. At such a low price per unit I can just throw a couple pouches of them in my camera bag and I m ready for whatever weather happens. I m sure my fellow photographers appreciate it too--I ve bailed friends out while shooting sports when it suddenly rained because I could just hand them one and not worry about getting it back. When done with them, you can simply dry out and reuse them, or dump them. You can buy a lot of these for the price of a pro nylon rain sleeve.Af far as using them, for all but the biggest lenses (like a 200-500mm lens) the original size works fine. I ve used them with a Nikon pro body with a 24-70 lens or a 70-200 lens on a pro body. It can be a bit tight for the long lens but it works fine. I don t try to line up the view hole in the cover with my viewfinder, I simply look through the plastic when shooting.You have to be a little careful with the open bottom end if it s raining hard and you are using a strap like a black rapid, but I don t find it to be a big problem. 4Perfect Size for DSLR with Vacation Telephoto or Prime Lens I wanted something simple and inexpensive that would protect my DSLR from potential water spray while on a boat trip. This thing delivered. I wish the manufacturer would do a better job describing dimensions. I bought both the Original and the Small. I had no problem using the 'Small' on my Sony A77 with both my 18-270mm f/3.5-6.3 telephoto lens and my 16-50mm f/2.8 prime lens. This protector has plenty of room for a full DSLR body, even if you have a battery grip attached. Then, there is 12" of distance between the back of the protector and the hole at the end where the lends peeks out. So, assemble your camera, extend your lens to the fullest. Measure the longest distance (from the backside of the body to front of the lens). If it's within 12" you're good to go. If it's longer (and this means you're doing some serious telephoto work) you'll want something bigger. For most folks with consumer/prosumer equipment this is the one for you. I did find that trying to view my shot with this thing on was a bit of a pain. The plastic is mostly transparent, but not crystal clear (especially after its been crumpled after several uses). And making any setting adjustments, including zooming the lens, could be equally challenging. But assuming you can set and forget things for awhile, you should have no trouble protecting your camera without investing a small fortune for a custom shell. 5Great emergency rain protection - Cheap insurance A very simple and cheap solution that does just what it's intended to do. For a professional looking to go out shooting in rainy conditions all day, every day, a dedicated heavy-duty rain protection system would be recommended, but for 'emergency' rain use, these are great to have. I have been using the Original 18" sleeves on two different cameras when I go wildlife and bird photographing in the Florida wetlands, where rain is an unfortunate possibility almost any day of the year. Often I go for long walks far from shelter or cars and prefer not to haul additional lenses or bags with me, so I'll just bring the camera and mounted lens...these rain sleeves when folded up can easily slip into a back pants pocket and not even be noticed - just a few mm thick and no larger than a wallet's length and width. If I see rain coming, I can get the camera into the sleeve in under 30 seconds, tighten up the front drawstring, and work on mounting the eyepiece over the hole. Sometimes I just skip that step as I can still shoot with the viewfinder even through the plastic - depends on how long I expect the rain to last. I use this sleeve on a medium-sized DSLR with a Tamron 150-600mm lens, and it fits very nicely, even allowing the Tamron full extension at 600mm. I also use this on a much smaller mirrorless camera body with a 70-300mm lens, and it's entirely too big but can still be used in a pinch. I do wish they made a size in between their 'small' 8" model and original 18" model - something like 12" would be perfect for a mirrorless or compact DSLR with a 70-200mm or 70-300mm mid-range zoom. 4Doesn't protect from hard rain. I really don't know what went wrong, but I ended up having to replace my DSLR after thinking this would protect my camera from Iceland rain - NOT. One of the people on the tour pointed out that I had a puddle of water in the rainsleeve after I was out using it on a very windy rainy cold day - I will NEVER again think I can protect my camera with one of these. I had water behind the screen of my camera, water in the battery compartment, and water in the SD card compartment. I wiped it down immediately, put the camera in rice, and my camera still wouldn't turn on. I was told the cost for repairs was equivalent to the price of a comparable new camera, so I ended up having to purchase a new camera. 1
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