• Netgear 8 Port Gigabit Ethernet Smart Managed Plus Po E Switch (Gs108 P Ev3)   With 4 X Po E @ 53 W, And
  • Netgear 8 Port Gigabit Ethernet Smart Managed Plus Po E Switch (Gs108 P Ev3)   With 4 X Po E @ 53 W, And
  • Netgear 8 Port Gigabit Ethernet Smart Managed Plus Po E Switch (Gs108 P Ev3)   With 4 X Po E @ 53 W, And
  • Netgear 8 Port Gigabit Ethernet Smart Managed Plus Po E Switch (Gs108 P Ev3)   With 4 X Po E @ 53 W, And
  • Netgear 8 Port Gigabit Ethernet Smart Managed Plus Po E Switch (Gs108 P Ev3)   With 4 X Po E @ 53 W, And
  • Netgear 8 Port Gigabit Ethernet Smart Managed Plus Po E Switch (Gs108 P Ev3)   With 4 X Po E @ 53 W, And
Netgear 8 Port Gigabit Ethernet Smart Managed Plus Po E Switch (Gs108 P Ev3)   With 4 X Po E @ 53 W, And
Netgear 8 Port Gigabit Ethernet Smart Managed Plus Po E Switch (Gs108 P Ev3)   With 4 X Po E @ 53 W, And
Netgear 8 Port Gigabit Ethernet Smart Managed Plus Po E Switch (Gs108 P Ev3)   With 4 X Po E @ 53 W, And
Netgear 8 Port Gigabit Ethernet Smart Managed Plus Po E Switch (Gs108 P Ev3)   With 4 X Po E @ 53 W, And
Netgear 8 Port Gigabit Ethernet Smart Managed Plus Po E Switch (Gs108 P Ev3)   With 4 X Po E @ 53 W, And
Netgear 8 Port Gigabit Ethernet Smart Managed Plus Po E Switch (Gs108 P Ev3)   With 4 X Po E @ 53 W, And

Netgear 8 Port Gigabit Ethernet Smart Managed Plus Po E Switch (Gs108 P Ev3) With 4 X Po E @ 53 W, And

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  • ETHERNET PORT CONFIGURATION: 8 Gigabit ports
  • POWER-OVER-ETHERNET: 4 PoE ports with 53W total power budget
  • CONFIGURATION & CONTROL: Management software with easy-to-use GUI interface offers basic capabilities to configure, secure, and monitor your network.
  • VERSATILE MOUNTING OPTIONS: Supports desktop or wall mount placement
  • SILENT OPERATION: The fanless design means zero added noise wherever its located, making it ideal for noise-sensitive environments
  • PROSAFE LIFETIME PROTECTION: Covered by an industry-best Lifetime Limited Hardware Warranty, Next Business Day Replacement and 24/7 chat with a NETGEAR expert
  • ENERGY EFFICIENT: Designed to optimize power usage lowering its cost to operate. Most models are compliant with IEEE802.3az Energy Efficient Ethernet mode.
  • BUILT TO LAST: Every NETGEAR Network switch is rigorously tested for reliability, quality, and performance.

Customer Reviews

Support is non-existent after 90 days. I purchased this switch in hopes that I could add some PoE cameras to my LAN in thew future. The future has come, I purchased a RLC-422 IP Camera that requires IEEE 802.3af PoE. Plugged it in.......Nothing not connection lights, swapped cable.......nothing. Checked that the JGS524PE is IEEE 802.3af compatible, the support site reads yes.The switch portion of the "Manged Switch"(Plus) seems to work OK, but I can't connect PoE devices to it. (which is why I purchased it.) Maybe I don't know how to turn on the PoE, it seems like the camera needs power to connect, but won't connect without power. I tried using the sub-par website for help but.....Because it has been over 90 days, my complimentary support has expired. You can search the support site but you have to read through EVERY POST, you can't search with-in your product's support topic/area. If you can, it's not easy to find. Searching for: JGS524PE PoE brings up generic PoE info or pages and pages of PoE posts for other equipment.I'm going to keep this as a managed switch(semi) but if your lookingf for PoE, I'd recommend you look elsewhere. 1Good and Bad This switch has its pros and cons.Cons:1. This switch does not measure the actual power drawn by the downstream PoE device. Instead it determines the class of the downstream PoE device, which can be class 0 - 3. It could care less about the actual power draw by the PoE devices. The reason so many people, including me have so much trouble powering more than one downstream PoE device is that most devices are not classified, and therefore end up being regarded by the GS105PE switch as the default class which is class 0, even if they are only drawing, say 5 watts which <<>> be a class 2 PoE device. However, since most devices are regarded as class 0 devices and the maximum power for class 0 is 12.94 watts, when you connect a second downstream class 0 PoE device, since the device <<>> draw up to an additional 12.94 watts, which is more than twice the advertised 19 watt limit, the Netgear GS105PE will not allow the second device to be powered, even though most class 0 devices, including mine, draw under 5 watts each. This is true even though in my case I am powering the Netgear from a PoE+ switch, and the PoE+ light is on on port 5 of the switch. According to the Netgear documentation, it should deliver a total of 19 watts to the two PoE pass through ports, but for the above reason, it will not. This is all very clearly explained at: [...] I find this very frustrating, as one of my GS105PE switches is powering a Ubiquiti AP-PRO (which defaults to a class 0 PoE device), and the entire load coming into the switch is only 6 watts, according to my big D-Link PoE switch that is powering the Netgear GS105PE. I would like to add a PoE camera (which I know draws only about 3 or 4 watts) to this switch, but cannot because it too comes up with the default class 0 classification!2. Difficult to upgrade the firmware, as it uses Trivial File Transfer ProtocolEven with these "Cons", I have used a bunch of these in applications where I only need to power the switch or use just one pass through device.Pros:1. If you just need an Ethernet switch that you can power via PoE, it works great, and/or2. If you just need one PoE pass through port, it works great.3. Seems to be nicely built, with a nice metal caseAll Mac computers come with at TFTP server built into them. Here is how to upgrade the firmware if you have a Mac:1. Download the latest firmware. Examine your downloads folder with the finder, and you will find a folder named something like "GS105PE_V1". Write down the name of that folder. Click on that folder, and within it should be the firmware file. Write down the name of the file. It should be something like "GS105PE_V1.4.0.9.bin"2. Using the Unix Terminal app, move (using the unix "mv" command) the firmware file from your Downloads folder to a folder (properly called a "directory" in Unix-speak) at "/private/tftpboot". The firmware file MUST be in this directory for TFTP to work. Here is how to do this:-- Find terminal in your applications folder-- Open terminal-- type "cd downloads" then hit enter-- type "cd GS105PE_V1" then hit enter. (Substitute the name of the folder you saw in your finder window as discussed above if it is different.)-- type "sudo mv GS105PE_V1.4.0.9.BIN /PRIVATE/TFTPBOOT" then press enter. (Substitute the name of the file you saw in the finder window if it is different.) (Please note there us a space between "BIN" and "/PRIVATE/TFTPBOOT".)-- enter your login password if promptedNote you can use the unix command "ls -l" to see the contents of each directory. Also, the information to the left of the dollar sign prompt ("$") will indicate which directory you are in so pay attention to be sure you have entered the change directory ("cd") commands correctly.The Unix command is not for everyone, but it is used by millions of computer professionals, and since Mac OS-X is built on top of Unix this is one reason I say the Mac OS-X is superior to Windows (IMHO). For anyone not familiar with the Unix command line, here are some examples of the commands you will need to run:example of cd (change directory) command ("~" to the left of the $ prompt indicates I am starting from my home directory):Erics-iMac:~ eric$ cd downloadsNow "downloads" is to the left of the eric$ prompt after I enter the above command:Erics-iMac:downloads eric$ cd gs105pe_v1Entering the above cd command takes me to the gs105pe_v1 directory, which is inside the downloads directory.This command takes you to the /private/tftpboot directory. Note putting a slash "/" before "private" means this starts at root. In the above example, when we entered "cd tftpboot" we did not use a "/", so we are just going to a directory within the downloads directory, which we were already in.Erics-iMac:~ eric$ cd /private/tftpbootNow you are in the txtpboot directory:Erics-Mac:tftpboot eric$Here is an ls -l command example.Erics-iMac:tftpboot eric$ ls -ltotal 1424-rwxr-xr-x@ 1 eric staff 726456 May 30 14:42 gs105pe_v1.4.0.9.binErics-iMac:tftpboot eric$This shows that only one file is in the tftpboot directory, and the file name is "gs105pe_v1.4.0.9.bin". The stuff on the far left is the files permissions; don't worry about it.Hope all this helps you.3. Now you need to activate the TFTP server on your Mac. You do this by entering the following command, again using the terminal app:"sudo launchctl load -w /System/Library/LaunchDaemons/tftp.plist" Press enter after you type this in to the Terminal app.4. Now you need to know the ip address of your Mac. The easiest way to find this is to click on the wifi icon at the top right side of your screen and then click on "Open Network Preferences" It will display the ip address of your Mac near the top of the window that opens. (You can also go to System Preferences by clicking on the apple logo at the top left of your screen, and click on Network there.)5. Now, open a browser and go to the ip address of your Netgear Ethernet Switch. If you don't know how to get into the switch, then you probably should not be fooling with this, but all you need is the ip address for the Netgear switch. For me I just enter 192.168.1.115 into my browser address window for one of my switches. Each switch will have its own IP address. Your ip address will be different. Check the documentation that came with the switch if you need help.6. You will need the password for the switch. Once you enter the password, check the firmware version that the switch has prior to upgrading the firmware, then click on Maintenance > Firmware upgrade.7. Once in the Firmware Upgrade window, click on "Enter Loader Mode" near the upper right side of your browser window.8. Now that you are in the Loader Mode, enter the ip address of your Mac, and enter the file name that you moved (using "sudo mv GS105PE_V1.4.0.9.BIN /PRIVATE/TFTPBOOT" as discussed above).Once you do all the above, it should upgrade the firmware, then reboot itself. Wait for it to reboot then log back into the switch and go back to the System Information and check to be sure it now has the latest version of the firmware.I TOLD YOU UPGRADING THE FIRMWARE IS CLUNKY!!! AND DON'T ASK ME HOW TO DO IT ON A PC. 3Great POE switch Easy plug-in-play for non techies. for the newbs...you MUST have a router in "front" of the switch for DHCP assignment. You cannot just plug your modem directly into the switch(unless you have a business account from your IPS which allows multiple static addresses or DHCP). If you have any issues Google is your friend. Don't leave bad feedback because you don't understand how to use this switch...do your research first.The fan is a little annoying, definitely not using a quality fan. You can easily purchase a quieter Sunon fan specifically for this model on eBay. I have mine setup in an enclosed entertainment center(yes, it vented) and cannot hear it. If you have it out in the open, on a desk, or sitting next to you it will become annoying.Generally a simple setup would be: modem --> router --> switch --> devices(computers/access points/surv. cameras) 5Good Switch; Loud Fan This switch works as expected. PoE ports function normally. I'm using them for power/data to a few surveillance cameras with no issue. Only complaint is the fan is unusually noisy. I don't mean in terms of air flow, but the fan itself sounds like it's grinding a little bit. Not great to hear from a brand new switch. We'll see if the fan holds up, I may have to test NETGEARS warranty here soon if it fails. 4being able to add at least a username would have been nice. #2 - Management IP VLAN can't be set I bought a few of these in order to get gigabit connectivity into a few rooms in my new house, where I also needed PoE and VLAN separation. The ones I own each have a PC, a Wireless AP, an IP Phone, and an IP Camera connected to them, with each device needing to be in it's own VLAN.They do the job. I specifically bought these because they were managed and I have a complicated network setup (I'm a network engineer by profession, so my home network is not your average).I only have a few gripes -#1 - Weak security. The web interface only allows you to use a password. While I wasn't expecting to do Active Directory or RADIUS auth on these, being able to add at least a username would have been nice.#2 - Management IP VLAN can't be set. This has some potential complications. If your network uses a different VLAN number for management (as most do), then the trunk setup to this switch will be non-standard. The IP you set will be in VLAN1, so you'll need to set your management VLAN on the upstream switch to be the native vlan (in cisco land, or untagged with other vendors)#3 - No SNMP. If you need to monitor the things that are attached to the device, and the things that are attached to it are not SNMP capable, then you're going to be blind. In my case, my AP's are lightweight, so they don't run SNMP either. I like to monitor the traffic on individual links so I can see where my bandwidth is going,For me, in an enterprise or real business setting, these issues would be a deal breaker. However, if all you need is gig connectivity, some PoE ports, and the ability to use VLANs, these things are great for the job. They don't take up alot of space and they don't suck up alot of power. 3Weak Unimpressed.This is one of a small class of devices which are simultaneously an 802.3at (a.k.a PoE+) PD (powered device) and an 802.3af (a.k.a PoE) PSE (power supplying equipment). This is a very narrow specification which attempts to take a maximum of 26W incoming (an 802.3at will supply 29.5W; but some loss on the wire is expected) and divide it into 3 streams to power itself and two 802.3af "pass through" ports. Since the default for 802.3af is 15.4W, it is already impossible for any such device to supply 30.8W on it's out-going ports: there is not enough juice even if the switch uses no power for itself. So, at best, there might be enough power to run a pair of Class 1 (4.5W) or Class 2 (7.5W) PD (most cameras are Class 3 or full bore PoE+). The GS105PE simply does not appear to have the necessary sophistication to play the requisite budgetary games to eke out its power oversubscription.The device is only manageable via a GUI (either http or a Window-only app which provides an identical interface) which is meager and klunky. There is no reporting of the type of PoE class which the switch thinks it is supplying or the amount of power distributed. It does not appear to use LLDP at all (one of the methods the IEEE PoE+ standard lists as a means to specify power requirements). I connected 2 Class 2 phones to the device using short patch cords and it would never supply power to more than one port; so I can only assume (since it won't report) that it did not recognize that the phone only required 7W. 2Works But No Warranty. I regret I am forced to buy another one of these but its function is unique. I have used 7 or 8 of these various jobs and it does what it says my problem came when one of them quit on me after 7 weeks and i tried to get Netgear to make good on the warranty. before you can send it for repair it seems you have to go through a grueling multi hour session with tech support asking for oddball specs and firmware versions of the every piece of equipment in the network including the the installed version of firmware of the now dead switch. In the end I just had to give up as they had wasted more of my time than the switch is worth,I guess its easy to offer a lifetime warranty when you don't intend to honor it. 1Works, but with EXTREMELY LIMITED use cases This switch will only supply two ports of power to a small fraction of 802.3af devices even with 802.3at inbound power. The only way to get two ports of power is with class 1 and 2 devices. Many devices report class 0 even though they draw very little power, and a single device of that sort means no PoE out the other port.I bought this switch intending to power a Hikvision IP camera and a Ubiquiti UAC AP Pro off a single run of cat6. I read that it needed 802.3at (PoE+) power in order to deliver 802.3af to both ports 1 and 2, so I purchased an injector.I powered it up and upgraded the firmware, which required using TFTP and a very primitive bootloader mode on the switch. This switch does not have web-based firmware upgrades. If you screw up the firmware upload, it stays in the primitive bootloader mode after a reboot, in which case it reverts back to its default IP of 192.168.0.139 - the bootloader mode does not support DHCP.Once I got that down pat I installed the switch. It powered great off the 802.3at injector, and displayed that it was receiving PoE+ power. Plugging in my two devices I saw that port 2 didn't seem to be supplying power, the PoE light was blinking. Uhoh...Some research later, I come to find that it only powers two ports of class 1 and 2 devices. This switch's web UI doesn't even display the power class of the devices it's powering! My Hikvision camera is class 3 and my Ubiquiti AP is class 0, so this switch cannot power them both. I only know their power class from looking on my other Netgear PoE switch, which is capable of telling me their power class.It works okay and is solidly built, but it is not clearly advertised that this thing cannot power a VERY SIGNIFICANT fraction of PoE devices normally, even if you supply it with PoE+. 3GARBAGE!!! This PoE powered switch is a complete piece of JUNK! Netgear support is horrible and has failed to address issues with this buggy device. All over their forums people are complaining that if power is disconnected from the switch and power is reapplied within a 5 minute period, then the switch will not successfully negotiate with the host switch, thus no power will PoE power will passthrough the devices connected to it. Don't waste your time with this buggy piece of junk. 1Switch works; if you understand its limitations.. Couldn't power other POE devices when hooked up to 802.3af (standard POE).. So I bit the bullet and purchased Netgear's GS728TP-100NAS, plugged this in to the PoEplus ports, and it allowed me to power up one PoE device (Bosch IP Camera)- once. After rebooting it while I was trying to get 2 PoE devices up and running, it never worked again. Though the GS728TP reports it is a Class 4 PoE device, this switch does not agree and won't power anything. It has never came back up as using PoEplus again. All firmware on both switches is up to date.Netgear forums suggest unplugging it for 5-10 minutes to get it working. I think I will unplug it for longer than that. Possibly OK for home, but not enterprise use!EDIT: Netgear contacted me and sent me a new switch; problem solved- the switch comes up using PoEplus consistently. Same power budget issues exist for this switch as other users. Wish the GUI would list the POE class of the attached POE devices. 4
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Reviews

Customer Reviews

Support is non-existent after 90 days. I purchased this switch in hopes that I could add some PoE cameras to my LAN in thew future. The future has come, I purchased a RLC-422 IP Camera that requires IEEE 802.3af PoE. Plugged it in.......Nothing not connection lights, swapped cable.......nothing. Checked that the JGS524PE is IEEE 802.3af compatible, the support site reads yes.The switch portion of the "Manged Switch"(Plus) seems to work OK, but I can't connect PoE devices to it. (which is why I purchased it.) Maybe I don't know how to turn on the PoE, it seems like the camera needs power to connect, but won't connect without power. I tried using the sub-par website for help but.....Because it has been over 90 days, my complimentary support has expired. You can search the support site but you have to read through EVERY POST, you can't search with-in your product's support topic/area. If you can, it's not easy to find. Searching for: JGS524PE PoE brings up generic PoE info or pages and pages of PoE posts for other equipment.I'm going to keep this as a managed switch(semi) but if your lookingf for PoE, I'd recommend you look elsewhere. 1Good and Bad This switch has its pros and cons.Cons:1. This switch does not measure the actual power drawn by the downstream PoE device. Instead it determines the class of the downstream PoE device, which can be class 0 - 3. It could care less about the actual power draw by the PoE devices. The reason so many people, including me have so much trouble powering more than one downstream PoE device is that most devices are not classified, and therefore end up being regarded by the GS105PE switch as the default class which is class 0, even if they are only drawing, say 5 watts which <<>> be a class 2 PoE device. However, since most devices are regarded as class 0 devices and the maximum power for class 0 is 12.94 watts, when you connect a second downstream class 0 PoE device, since the device <<>> draw up to an additional 12.94 watts, which is more than twice the advertised 19 watt limit, the Netgear GS105PE will not allow the second device to be powered, even though most class 0 devices, including mine, draw under 5 watts each. This is true even though in my case I am powering the Netgear from a PoE+ switch, and the PoE+ light is on on port 5 of the switch. According to the Netgear documentation, it should deliver a total of 19 watts to the two PoE pass through ports, but for the above reason, it will not. This is all very clearly explained at: [...] I find this very frustrating, as one of my GS105PE switches is powering a Ubiquiti AP-PRO (which defaults to a class 0 PoE device), and the entire load coming into the switch is only 6 watts, according to my big D-Link PoE switch that is powering the Netgear GS105PE. I would like to add a PoE camera (which I know draws only about 3 or 4 watts) to this switch, but cannot because it too comes up with the default class 0 classification!2. Difficult to upgrade the firmware, as it uses Trivial File Transfer ProtocolEven with these "Cons", I have used a bunch of these in applications where I only need to power the switch or use just one pass through device.Pros:1. If you just need an Ethernet switch that you can power via PoE, it works great, and/or2. If you just need one PoE pass through port, it works great.3. Seems to be nicely built, with a nice metal caseAll Mac computers come with at TFTP server built into them. Here is how to upgrade the firmware if you have a Mac:1. Download the latest firmware. Examine your downloads folder with the finder, and you will find a folder named something like "GS105PE_V1". Write down the name of that folder. Click on that folder, and within it should be the firmware file. Write down the name of the file. It should be something like "GS105PE_V1.4.0.9.bin"2. Using the Unix Terminal app, move (using the unix "mv" command) the firmware file from your Downloads folder to a folder (properly called a "directory" in Unix-speak) at "/private/tftpboot". The firmware file MUST be in this directory for TFTP to work. Here is how to do this:-- Find terminal in your applications folder-- Open terminal-- type "cd downloads" then hit enter-- type "cd GS105PE_V1" then hit enter. (Substitute the name of the folder you saw in your finder window as discussed above if it is different.)-- type "sudo mv GS105PE_V1.4.0.9.BIN /PRIVATE/TFTPBOOT" then press enter. (Substitute the name of the file you saw in the finder window if it is different.) (Please note there us a space between "BIN" and "/PRIVATE/TFTPBOOT".)-- enter your login password if promptedNote you can use the unix command "ls -l" to see the contents of each directory. Also, the information to the left of the dollar sign prompt ("$") will indicate which directory you are in so pay attention to be sure you have entered the change directory ("cd") commands correctly.The Unix command is not for everyone, but it is used by millions of computer professionals, and since Mac OS-X is built on top of Unix this is one reason I say the Mac OS-X is superior to Windows (IMHO). For anyone not familiar with the Unix command line, here are some examples of the commands you will need to run:example of cd (change directory) command ("~" to the left of the $ prompt indicates I am starting from my home directory):Erics-iMac:~ eric$ cd downloadsNow "downloads" is to the left of the eric$ prompt after I enter the above command:Erics-iMac:downloads eric$ cd gs105pe_v1Entering the above cd command takes me to the gs105pe_v1 directory, which is inside the downloads directory.This command takes you to the /private/tftpboot directory. Note putting a slash "/" before "private" means this starts at root. In the above example, when we entered "cd tftpboot" we did not use a "/", so we are just going to a directory within the downloads directory, which we were already in.Erics-iMac:~ eric$ cd /private/tftpbootNow you are in the txtpboot directory:Erics-Mac:tftpboot eric$Here is an ls -l command example.Erics-iMac:tftpboot eric$ ls -ltotal 1424-rwxr-xr-x@ 1 eric staff 726456 May 30 14:42 gs105pe_v1.4.0.9.binErics-iMac:tftpboot eric$This shows that only one file is in the tftpboot directory, and the file name is "gs105pe_v1.4.0.9.bin". The stuff on the far left is the files permissions; don't worry about it.Hope all this helps you.3. Now you need to activate the TFTP server on your Mac. You do this by entering the following command, again using the terminal app:"sudo launchctl load -w /System/Library/LaunchDaemons/tftp.plist" Press enter after you type this in to the Terminal app.4. Now you need to know the ip address of your Mac. The easiest way to find this is to click on the wifi icon at the top right side of your screen and then click on "Open Network Preferences" It will display the ip address of your Mac near the top of the window that opens. (You can also go to System Preferences by clicking on the apple logo at the top left of your screen, and click on Network there.)5. Now, open a browser and go to the ip address of your Netgear Ethernet Switch. If you don't know how to get into the switch, then you probably should not be fooling with this, but all you need is the ip address for the Netgear switch. For me I just enter 192.168.1.115 into my browser address window for one of my switches. Each switch will have its own IP address. Your ip address will be different. Check the documentation that came with the switch if you need help.6. You will need the password for the switch. Once you enter the password, check the firmware version that the switch has prior to upgrading the firmware, then click on Maintenance > Firmware upgrade.7. Once in the Firmware Upgrade window, click on "Enter Loader Mode" near the upper right side of your browser window.8. Now that you are in the Loader Mode, enter the ip address of your Mac, and enter the file name that you moved (using "sudo mv GS105PE_V1.4.0.9.BIN /PRIVATE/TFTPBOOT" as discussed above).Once you do all the above, it should upgrade the firmware, then reboot itself. Wait for it to reboot then log back into the switch and go back to the System Information and check to be sure it now has the latest version of the firmware.I TOLD YOU UPGRADING THE FIRMWARE IS CLUNKY!!! AND DON'T ASK ME HOW TO DO IT ON A PC. 3Great POE switch Easy plug-in-play for non techies. for the newbs...you MUST have a router in "front" of the switch for DHCP assignment. You cannot just plug your modem directly into the switch(unless you have a business account from your IPS which allows multiple static addresses or DHCP). If you have any issues Google is your friend. Don't leave bad feedback because you don't understand how to use this switch...do your research first.The fan is a little annoying, definitely not using a quality fan. You can easily purchase a quieter Sunon fan specifically for this model on eBay. I have mine setup in an enclosed entertainment center(yes, it vented) and cannot hear it. If you have it out in the open, on a desk, or sitting next to you it will become annoying.Generally a simple setup would be: modem --> router --> switch --> devices(computers/access points/surv. cameras) 5Good Switch; Loud Fan This switch works as expected. PoE ports function normally. I'm using them for power/data to a few surveillance cameras with no issue. Only complaint is the fan is unusually noisy. I don't mean in terms of air flow, but the fan itself sounds like it's grinding a little bit. Not great to hear from a brand new switch. We'll see if the fan holds up, I may have to test NETGEARS warranty here soon if it fails. 4being able to add at least a username would have been nice. #2 - Management IP VLAN can't be set I bought a few of these in order to get gigabit connectivity into a few rooms in my new house, where I also needed PoE and VLAN separation. The ones I own each have a PC, a Wireless AP, an IP Phone, and an IP Camera connected to them, with each device needing to be in it's own VLAN.They do the job. I specifically bought these because they were managed and I have a complicated network setup (I'm a network engineer by profession, so my home network is not your average).I only have a few gripes -#1 - Weak security. The web interface only allows you to use a password. While I wasn't expecting to do Active Directory or RADIUS auth on these, being able to add at least a username would have been nice.#2 - Management IP VLAN can't be set. This has some potential complications. If your network uses a different VLAN number for management (as most do), then the trunk setup to this switch will be non-standard. The IP you set will be in VLAN1, so you'll need to set your management VLAN on the upstream switch to be the native vlan (in cisco land, or untagged with other vendors)#3 - No SNMP. If you need to monitor the things that are attached to the device, and the things that are attached to it are not SNMP capable, then you're going to be blind. In my case, my AP's are lightweight, so they don't run SNMP either. I like to monitor the traffic on individual links so I can see where my bandwidth is going,For me, in an enterprise or real business setting, these issues would be a deal breaker. However, if all you need is gig connectivity, some PoE ports, and the ability to use VLANs, these things are great for the job. They don't take up alot of space and they don't suck up alot of power. 3Weak Unimpressed.This is one of a small class of devices which are simultaneously an 802.3at (a.k.a PoE+) PD (powered device) and an 802.3af (a.k.a PoE) PSE (power supplying equipment). This is a very narrow specification which attempts to take a maximum of 26W incoming (an 802.3at will supply 29.5W; but some loss on the wire is expected) and divide it into 3 streams to power itself and two 802.3af "pass through" ports. Since the default for 802.3af is 15.4W, it is already impossible for any such device to supply 30.8W on it's out-going ports: there is not enough juice even if the switch uses no power for itself. So, at best, there might be enough power to run a pair of Class 1 (4.5W) or Class 2 (7.5W) PD (most cameras are Class 3 or full bore PoE+). The GS105PE simply does not appear to have the necessary sophistication to play the requisite budgetary games to eke out its power oversubscription.The device is only manageable via a GUI (either http or a Window-only app which provides an identical interface) which is meager and klunky. There is no reporting of the type of PoE class which the switch thinks it is supplying or the amount of power distributed. It does not appear to use LLDP at all (one of the methods the IEEE PoE+ standard lists as a means to specify power requirements). I connected 2 Class 2 phones to the device using short patch cords and it would never supply power to more than one port; so I can only assume (since it won't report) that it did not recognize that the phone only required 7W. 2Works But No Warranty. I regret I am forced to buy another one of these but its function is unique. I have used 7 or 8 of these various jobs and it does what it says my problem came when one of them quit on me after 7 weeks and i tried to get Netgear to make good on the warranty. before you can send it for repair it seems you have to go through a grueling multi hour session with tech support asking for oddball specs and firmware versions of the every piece of equipment in the network including the the installed version of firmware of the now dead switch. In the end I just had to give up as they had wasted more of my time than the switch is worth,I guess its easy to offer a lifetime warranty when you don't intend to honor it. 1Works, but with EXTREMELY LIMITED use cases This switch will only supply two ports of power to a small fraction of 802.3af devices even with 802.3at inbound power. The only way to get two ports of power is with class 1 and 2 devices. Many devices report class 0 even though they draw very little power, and a single device of that sort means no PoE out the other port.I bought this switch intending to power a Hikvision IP camera and a Ubiquiti UAC AP Pro off a single run of cat6. I read that it needed 802.3at (PoE+) power in order to deliver 802.3af to both ports 1 and 2, so I purchased an injector.I powered it up and upgraded the firmware, which required using TFTP and a very primitive bootloader mode on the switch. This switch does not have web-based firmware upgrades. If you screw up the firmware upload, it stays in the primitive bootloader mode after a reboot, in which case it reverts back to its default IP of 192.168.0.139 - the bootloader mode does not support DHCP.Once I got that down pat I installed the switch. It powered great off the 802.3at injector, and displayed that it was receiving PoE+ power. Plugging in my two devices I saw that port 2 didn't seem to be supplying power, the PoE light was blinking. Uhoh...Some research later, I come to find that it only powers two ports of class 1 and 2 devices. This switch's web UI doesn't even display the power class of the devices it's powering! My Hikvision camera is class 3 and my Ubiquiti AP is class 0, so this switch cannot power them both. I only know their power class from looking on my other Netgear PoE switch, which is capable of telling me their power class.It works okay and is solidly built, but it is not clearly advertised that this thing cannot power a VERY SIGNIFICANT fraction of PoE devices normally, even if you supply it with PoE+. 3GARBAGE!!! This PoE powered switch is a complete piece of JUNK! Netgear support is horrible and has failed to address issues with this buggy device. All over their forums people are complaining that if power is disconnected from the switch and power is reapplied within a 5 minute period, then the switch will not successfully negotiate with the host switch, thus no power will PoE power will passthrough the devices connected to it. Don't waste your time with this buggy piece of junk. 1Switch works; if you understand its limitations.. Couldn't power other POE devices when hooked up to 802.3af (standard POE).. So I bit the bullet and purchased Netgear's GS728TP-100NAS, plugged this in to the PoEplus ports, and it allowed me to power up one PoE device (Bosch IP Camera)- once. After rebooting it while I was trying to get 2 PoE devices up and running, it never worked again. Though the GS728TP reports it is a Class 4 PoE device, this switch does not agree and won't power anything. It has never came back up as using PoEplus again. All firmware on both switches is up to date.Netgear forums suggest unplugging it for 5-10 minutes to get it working. I think I will unplug it for longer than that. Possibly OK for home, but not enterprise use!EDIT: Netgear contacted me and sent me a new switch; problem solved- the switch comes up using PoEplus consistently. Same power budget issues exist for this switch as other users. Wish the GUI would list the POE class of the attached POE devices. 4
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