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Load image into Gallery viewer, Manfrotto 327 Rc2 Light Duty Joystick Grip Ball Head ,Black
Load image into Gallery viewer, Manfrotto 327 Rc2 Light Duty Joystick Grip Ball Head ,Black
Load image into Gallery viewer, Manfrotto 327 Rc2 Light Duty Joystick Grip Ball Head ,Black
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Manfrotto 327 Rc2 Light Duty Joystick Grip Ball Head ,Black
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Manfrotto 327 Rc2 Light Duty Joystick Grip Ball Head ,Black
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Manfrotto 327 Rc2 Light Duty Joystick Grip Ball Head ,Black
Vendor
Manfrotto

Manfrotto 327 Rc2 Light Duty Joystick Grip Ball Head ,Black

4.1
Regular price
€365,00
Sale price
€365,00
Regular price
€602,00
Sold out
Unit price
per 
Save 39% (€237,00)
Error You can't add more than 500 quantity.

  • Tracked Shipping on All Orders
  • 14 Days Returns

Description

  • New hollow stainless steel ball
  • Special ergonomic design
  • Secure friction control
  • Built in quick release

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Customer Reviews

As close to the ideal ball head for still photography as I have found. This is turning out to be as close to the ideal ball head for still photography as I have found so far. For me, the main problems that it solves are ease of use, packable weight, and reliability.What I have found most annoying about most of the ball heads out there is that every time I get the head properly adjusted, tightening the locking mechanism causes the head to move. If they moved the same way every time, at least I could compensate for that, but that is not how it happens; the movement is always random and unpredictable.With this head, when I release the lever, the head stays where I put it provided the tension is enough to hold the weight of the camera and lens, of course.The variable tension is a very important feature. It is something to play with and get familiar with before actually using the head to take pictures. I imagine it taking no more than a half hour or so of experimentation to get up to speed with that for still photography. I doubt very much this would be a viable option for video. Similarly, I don't see it as an optimal head for panoramas, although with a little practice, I can see it would be possible.In the horizontal position, I have found this head to be remarkably stable, so much so that I have little desire to test how it performs in the vertical or "joystick" orientation. Someone else will have to answer any questions about that.This head loses a star because, for my purposes, it has what so many other heads have, a bias towards downward angles, rather than upward. A simple work-around is to mount the camera such that the handle is aligned with the lens. The head can then be operated with the handle in front, rather than from behind or to the side. Again, this is quite viable for still photography, but probably not useful for video.In regard to the mount, I find greater versatility and sanity in standardizing on the Arca-Swiss system, so I have added a light-weight Arca-Swiss compatible clamp atop the supplied Manfrotto plate. It works for me, and YMMV. 4Extremely versatile for landscape orientation, bad for architectural. Not so much for portrait If you shoot primarily in landscape orientation (not sideways), this head is perfect. It has the traditional Bogan/Manfrotto quick release plate system, with the newer style lever and lock. Gripping the handle and giving the lever a squeeze releases the lock, allowing the camera to be rotated. There's a friction adjustment that controls how tight the rotation is when squeezed (I keep it all the way off.) To control the grip release, there's a little strap you can slip over the grip. I don't use it. The design is almost perfect.If you use the head to orient your camera in portrait mode, the one major flaw is soon evident - when rotated so the camera is sideways, say to shoot a door frame, you can't angle the camera down more than a few degrees. For example, I was shooting portrait, trying to grab a hole in the rood, light splash on the floor and the light ray. I was up a few feet. Tried to angle the camera down - it would not go far enough. Since I needed to shoot a 4 second exposure, handheld was not an option. So I had to go very wide and shoot at 24mm instead of 44mm, then crop.A regular ball head has a notch just for this purpose - for some reason this head does not. Also missing is the rotation/degree indicator.I've updated this review after using the head for about a month on a dozen shoots. For basic shooting where not much camera travel is needed, it's fine. The quality is typical Manfrotto - near perfect. But it's overly large, and the restricted travel has really been a pain on several shoots. Can't point it far enough up for ceiling shots or wall/ceiling corners, or down for floor shots - I'm not talking straight down - but a decent downward angle. I mainly shoot architectural subjects, and those angles are important. If I could, I'd return in. 3Best grip head on the market What I should have gotten first. So I wanted a pistol grip or trigger release tripod head for my 20x50 binocs to make terrain scanning easier. Tried the cheapo and heavy vertical grip that is a copy of an old design, and got a crappy copy of an old design that doesn t sell well for a reason - there are better ones now. Tried an updated version made by Vanguard. It worked fair, except for a defect in the tension, and has an awkward grip and release mechanism. Finally spent for the Manfrotto. It works beautifully, in all directions, is smooth and easy to use, and holds position when the trigger is released. Yes, you get what you pay for. And I m happy about it. 5Almost had to send it back... Whew! I am glad I just figured out what my problem was. I received this head and was super excited about it. After taking it out of the box and playing with it, I noticed that it took a lot of force to squeeze the trigger and even when the trigger was fully depressed and the friction wheel set all the way down, it would still not operate smoothly. I could get it to move around but it would be very jerky and there was no way that I was going to make precise adjustments. I could not figure out if it was a defect in the ball, if it needed more lubrication, or if the trigger mechanism was shot. I was a little disappointed with Manfrotto thinking that they sent me a defective item and that I would need to return it and get another one.Fortunately, I kept playing with the head and pondering what I could do to resolve the issue. I remember reading in the directions that there is a small adjustment screw located just on the end of the trigger (next to where your pointer finger would rest) that can be operated with the smaller of the two allen key provided. In the directions, they say "After extended use you may notice that the ball locking mechanism becomes slightly more slack. You can re-adjust this by tightening screw "R" very slightly using the supplied allen key "T". Only small adjustments are necessary to regain full locking power." In my case, I had the opposite problem. The screw was too tight and upon loosening it a couple of rotations, I finally was able to move the ball head very smoothly and I did not have to use nearly as much force to squeeze the trigger to get it to move.Manfrotto packages the head with the tension relief band on the trigger. Since my head was set improperly, the band was not doing much to begin with. Now that I have adjusted the locking mechanism, when I put the band over the trigger and the friction set to its lowest amount, it allows the ball to freely move about. And when the band is off of the trigger, the ball is locked in place. I am telling this to you to provide a guideline as to how you set the locking mechanism if you ever need to adjust it.If I had received this item in its present state (after I tinkered with it) I would have given it five stars but since it sent me for a loop to the point of almost sending it back, I dinged it a star. I wrote this review to hopefully help someone else out who gets in a similar situation as me. Take care and happy shooting! 4Perfect head for my landscape, astrophotography, and portraiture needs. This head is perfect for my needs. I shoot landscapes, astrophotography, and portraiture with a Nikon D750. This head is rock-steady, and my long exposure shots aren't affected by any tripod movement or shake whatsoever. The ability to simply squeeze the trip and move the head to any desired position is fantastic. For anyone complaining about tension issues, they are easily fixed by tightening the tension screw with the provided Allen wrench. I would not hesitate to purchase this again, or to suggest it to any of my photography friends. 5Everything it claims to be - more than the sum of its parts The 322RC2 Ball Head and rapid connect plate, used in combination with a decent set of tripod legs (for example, Bogen Manfrotto 190XPROB) are a profound step up from the all-in-one tripods you may be used to. Even more importantly, they are a step up from most other ball heads by virtue of the immense improvement in both speed and ease of aiming your camera once actually mounted to the ball head. I can't emphasize this enough: This product actually changes how you use your camera, because repositioning the camera on all axis at once is a one hand, fraction of a second operation.I know that's hard to visualize, so let me describe the process. The head has a handle sticking out the side, quite substantial and comfortable, that fits in your hand (right or left, your choice.) On this handle is a very large "trigger" that fits beneath all of your fingers as they wrap around the handle. When you pull this trigger, the ball head releases your camera and you can move it, using the handle as a precise and ergonomic lever, to any new position you like in no more time than it takes to adjust your wrist and arm - essentially immediately. Then you simply let go of the trigger and the ball head locks the camera right where you have it pointed.The process I just described applies equally to large pans and tilts as it does to tiny pointing adjustments. If you find that difficult to believe, I'm with you - so did I - but having used the head extensively, trust me, it really works as advertised.There is almost no post-lock sag; that's the effect where you point the camera, tighten the locks, and then when you look, the camera has drooped below the actual point of aim you intended. There is a tiny bit; I don't think it will affect most users. For example, I often shoot images of the moon using a 500mm or 600mm lens. My camera, an EOS 40D, has a "live view" mode that allows me to magnify the center of the view until the LCD screen has a 1:1 group of pixels from the center of the 10 megapixel sensor, effectively magnifying the view many times. With this on, I can see only a fraction of the day/night terminator on the moon, and can watch the moon move steadily and visibly across my point of aim. With this ball head, when I point the camera in this state, letting go of the trigger results in "droop" that amounts to about 10% of the view height, which is perhaps a 2% droop of the total image height. I know that when I fire the shot, I'm going to find my original aiming point pretty much dead center in the photo, which of course is what we're all looking for. Without the live view magnification on, there is no visible droop at all.The quick release plate functions very well. There is a safety catch that must be released in order to remove your camera; with it set correctly, the camera can be removed with one easy flip of a lever. With it in the safety position, you can't remove the camera. Once the camera has been removed, the camera locking lever is in the unlocked position; a really nice feature is that when you put the camera back on the head, there is a brass pressure-trigger that automatically snaps the locking lever (but not the safety) into place as you put the quick-release plate into the mounted position. The camera goes from off-head to on-head in a one-handed motion that involves no more than accurately reaching for the head and turning your wrist, then "click", and the camera is secure. Now turn the safety catch, and no worries about accidentally popping the camera off the head. Another nice feature on the quick release plate is the mounting system to the camera provides for a drop-down handle to tighten and release the screw that goes into the camera body. There will be no searching for coins or tearing up your fingernails with this design.That 11 pound capacity means that for almost any reasonable lens combination, this head has considerably more capacity than it requires to hold your SLR or DSLR with great authority. This extra capacity translates into great stability for lighter loads; my 40D and a Canon 85mm f/1.2L lens together weigh just a few pounds, and the head and tripod have what feels like a "death-grip" on them, the stability is so evident. No trembling in the wind (and I live on the plains in eastern Montana... I shoot in 10 to 30 mph winds as often as not), no tweaking of the aim as I fiddle with the many controls on the camera, no drooping when I reach out and manually focus the camera. Just a wonderfully stable and usable design.The head has its own ball level you can use, and it is very easy to see while aiming using the trigger, but of course if you're looking at the level, you're not looking at what the camera sees; I never had a great deal of use for such things. If your camera can provide horizontal and/or vertical guides in-picture, that's a better choice for framing things by a long shot. Still, the level is there if you need it. The tripod legs I mention above also have their own level, and I *do* tend to use that when I set the legs up. The reason for that is if the tripod is vertical and you have the legs all the way out, you've made certain that the weight of the head and the ball are centered above the tripod's feet, and so the odds of overbalancing the system are much lower. So just a word to the wise, always level your tripod, and don't fret too much about the head.The head has a tension control that you can set to a lighter grip on the ball if your gear isn't as heavy as the weight limit for the head. However, I suggest this is left in the maximum tension position; the reason for that is that the firmer the lock to the ball, the less droop you get in aiming, and the less vibration you'll get when adjusting things like your lenses focus ring or other camera controls.There is a threaded mount-point for an accessory that holds your camera's remote shutter release; the idea of this is to move the camera shutter control right down by the same hand that is adjusting the camera. That's one way to do it; another is to set the head up for left-handed use and keep your right hand on the camera. Given the choice, I go for the latter because there is a lot more to do than just control the shutter these days; we have exposure lock, focus lock, and various knobs and wheels affecting other settings as well. But you do have the choice, and this shows that the manufacturer was thinking about how we might actually use the head, not just about how to hold a camera tightly.The head will adjust upwards until the handle is pointed directly up and away from your tripod; this makes the tripod easier to pack, but adds about eight inches to the tripod's collapsed length. Keep that in mind if you're thinking about a companion bag for the system. Unmounting the head is a simple matter of twisting it about and it will unscrew from the tripod in a reasonable number of turns - not a problem at all. Detached, the head fits in large camera bags without too much difficulty; I use a Tamrac 5612 Pro 12 bag, and the head slips into one of the full-height compartments just fine. Don't expect to fit the head into a purse-sized bag, that's just not going to happen.Bogen Manfrotto provide a good warranty, but I don't expect you'll ever get to use it. You'll see why when you get this thing in your hand. It is built tough. Really, really tough.Photo pros are fond of making very sweeping statements about tripods and heads in general; one you hear constantly is that a good tripod system is worth more than a new lens in many situations. Let me echo that sentiment here, and let me say that because of the amazing convenience and speed that the triggered ball release provides, taken together with the great stability and lack of droop the high-load magnesium ball lock brings to your tripod system, I give the 322RC2 my absolute highest recommendation. I can't see how it could be improved. It is built like a battleship and I can't see how you could damage it barring running over it with a bulldozer. It has *significantly* increased my enjoyment of my camera and if it were to be stolen or lost, I would replace it instantly without even bothering to research what other heads might be available. It is really that good.As far as I'm concerned, there's no way to go wrong recommending the purchase of this head, and that goes for those who already have considerably more expensive heads, too. It isn't often that something comes along that significantly and broadly improves the actual way we take pictures. Try this gem; I just know you're going to like it. 5Good product, but...... This is a good product. If you hadn't anything to compare it against, you'd probably be ok with it; however, Manfrotto makes a better product...the 322. Yes, you have to pack an extra HALF pound around, and yes it costs like 10 bucks more or something, but the 322 is so much SMOOTHER (not even close...I mean NOT-EVEN-CLOSE to the 324), and it is also a lot more solid when the trigger is let go.This product, the 324 is small, compact, light, and will get the job done for most photographers who don't need to constantly pan horizontally or rotate vertically to follow something. If you are setting up to shoot sunsets, flowers, perched birds etc. etc. this ball head may be just the ticket for you and the half pound savings would probably be worth it. It is very solid and I expect it will handle all but the very biggest camera/lens combos. So my issue is with the movement, not the steadiness. I bought this for a spotting scope. Since I constantly pan and rotate the scope, when I unboxed the 324 and played with it, my heart sank. I have the Brunton version of the 322 and it is far smoother. I can tell it wasn't a lube problem with the 324. It was sticky, jerky, and plain rough. I tried the adjustment hex screw and it didn't solve the problem. Tried the friction knob...no luck. What finally worked for me?...I ordered a 322 (accepting the 0.5 lb increase, sigh) and it is the most amazingly smooth but solid joystick head I've ever handled...even better than my Brunton clone of the 322.Final recommendation...this is a very good head, and for many this will be plenty nice enough with the lower cost and benefit of lower weight. For me, hands down the 322 is a far better head. I would like to try the 327 but expect that since it uses the same ball as the 324, I would be perhaps wasting my time. Thrilled with my new 322. Thank you amazon for taking back my 324. 3Joystick tripod head Wow. This thing rocks! My wife loves it! Gave it as an early birthday present, and scored major points. I had concerns regarding the strength of the ball head holding up a 5d mkii, 580ex flash, canon L lense etc, but it's rock solid. Not having much, read any, photographic experience, I went to my friend Amazon to investigate what was available. This head is a substantial piece of gear that should outlast our need for it. Paired with a Manfrotto 055xprob tripod, I shouldn't have to ever buy another tripod/head, unless we upgrade to carbon fiber or start taking panoramas. Amazon service was outstanding as always. Overall, 5 stars for the product and Amazons pricing and customer support. If you are looking for a joystick tripod head, this is the one. Kind of funny looking, a little overweight, but solid and dependable. Just like my lovely wife's favorite husband. 5Made to last I bought this to replace my cheap ($40) Promaster head which lasted about 1.5 years. The 322RC2 should last a lot longer, and it's a lot more durable. When you release the grip, it stays put! There's no drifting or sagging. I used it for a couple of photo shoots a few days ago, and it works flawlessly. (Update: I wouldn't recommend it for a really heavy setup; it may not hold. For my T3 and 70-300 lens, it works great.)It feels solid and heavy. Unless you abuse it, it should last a long time. I'm giving it four stars only because there's no easy way to pan. If I don't have the tripod's center post extended, I can loosen the lock and pan that way. Otherwise, it's going to be a problem.Update: I've switched it to point the handle up just to see how that works. (All you have to do is use the included Allen wrench and pull a couple of bolts out, then switch to the other holes.) So far, I kinda like it that way. Gives me a bit more height so I don't have to bend over so much to see through the viewfinder. 4Good solid head but check screw tightness over time Purchased this two years ago. Love the joystick and stability. However, I was about ready to replace it with a traditional ball head because of drift problems that have been getting progressively worse. I shoot with a Canon 5D Mark III which is pretty heavy. Add a 70mm-200mm or 100mm-400mm lens and you've got a fair amount of weight. The head can easily handle this load but over time, I've noticed considerable sag after setting the spot I want the lens to focus on. I've also been getting several blurred shots if shutter speed exceed a couple of seconds. In reading reviews on the 322RC2, I noticed a couple of reports regarding tightening the shiny Allen screw situated close to the thumb area of the joystick. I checked it, it was a tad loose, and after tightening the screw the lens sag is gone and all is well. 4
Manfrotto 327 Rc2 Light Duty Joystick Grip Ball Head ,Black

Manfrotto 327 Rc2 Light Duty Joystick Grip Ball Head ,Black

4.1
Error You can't add more than 500 quantity.
Regular price
€365,00
Sale price
€365,00
Regular price
€602,00
Sold out
Unit price
per 
Save 39% (€237,00)