• Lutron Maestro Motion Sensor switch, no neutral required,  600 Watts Single-Pole/Multi Location, MS-OPS5M-GS, Goldstone
  • Lutron Maestro Motion Sensor switch, no neutral required,  600 Watts Single-Pole/Multi Location, MS-OPS5M-GS, Goldstone
Lutron Maestro Motion Sensor switch, no neutral required,  600 Watts Single-Pole/Multi Location, MS-OPS5M-GS, Goldstone
Lutron Maestro Motion Sensor switch, no neutral required,  600 Watts Single-Pole/Multi Location, MS-OPS5M-GS, Goldstone

Lutron Maestro Motion Sensor switch, no neutral required, 600 Watts Single-Pole/Multi Location, MS-OPS5M-GS, Goldstone

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  • Motion Sensor Switch automatically turns lights or exhaust fans ON and OFF
  • Detects fine motion 2-3 times better than competition with up to 900 square feet of coverage
  • Easily replaces existing switches in all homes - no neutral required and simple button press setup
  • Works with all bulb types: 600 Watt incandescent, halogen, ELV; 450 Watt MLV; 360 Watt LED/CFL, 5 Amp ballasts, 3 Amp exhaust fans
  • This single-pole/Multi-location switch works best in larger rooms or hallways and requires a ground wire
  • Includes (1) Maestro motion sensor switch; coordinating Wall Plate sold separately (CW-1-WH)

Customer Reviews

3 WAY Instructions and Diagram: DOES Work Confirmed Update: Aug 1st 2013: Added caveat to clarify what will NOT work, formatted for easy read and to think why this has so few votes :-). Does not matter as long as this helps anyone and thats the reason we write review(s) and share information.Journey/Failures:I had been unsuccessfully playing with Leviton's ODS-10-id to create a multi-location sensor, example across the staircase, while Leviton set-up works but due to unknown reasons to me or to Leviton's Support, sensors switch on lights even in bright day, really bright. So I had been looking for an alternate solution.Solution with Caveat:Lutron does not publish or even their support declines the multi-location occupancy sensor. I did post a picture for wiring diagram as "to be tested" but I can confirm now as "it DOES WORK". Caveat is that both the switches need to timeout or manually shut off to switch off the light/load. Other than that it automates everything for you, I never had a need to switch off lights manually so far in past 1 year+.HOW TO:Again, please do refer to my diagram as well. So for wiring for a 3-way, as you already know, there are two sides. One side uses the line/hot known as HOT SIDE and other one has the wire that goes to load known as LEG/LOAD SIDE. Both sides are connected to each other via TWO Traveler wires.How to find HOT: Switch off breaker, open box, disconnect all wires from existing switch, Switch on breaker, check line/power, mark hot wire, switch off and proceed with sensor connectivityHOT SIDE (refer diagram)========Line/HOT - Black (top) of Sensor + Traveler Wire ATraveler B - Black (bottom)Bare Copper Ground - Bare silver + GreenLEG SIDE========Traveler A - Black (top) of SensorTraveler B - Black (Bottom) + LoadBare Copper Ground - Bare silver + GreenBlue - Not connected in both sidesDISCLAIMER: Did work for me and may/may_not work for you depending on wiring etc. I am just an engineer and a homeowner with passion for automation and absolutely not an Electrician. When in doubt "please" call a LICENSED authority known as Electrician.Happy to answer any questions as always. The picture I posted, with colored wires, to ensure clarity although resolution is not so great after Amazon conversion. For high resolution leave an email address and will send you link from my personal cloud for clear printable pdf file. 5Works Perfectly Great switch. We've actually used it to make a set of carport lights automatically activate when a car pulls in. I needed this kind of switch because the previous wiring was set with TWO switches, and on always taking priority (so not three way, just two separate opportunities to close the circuit in the on position). This let me maintain the one normal on/off switch while ALSO having it turn on whenever a car pulls in from the motion. Just make sure to protect it from the elements if you plan to use it this way, it is NOT weather proof, and you could end up with a dangerous situation due to corrosion and the like if you do not take proper precautions. 5If it works for you, you'll be happy In the right spot, this switch may be a great solution, but it has limitations in a stairwell. The motion sensor is wide-angle, but almost entirely on the horizontal. So, with the switch at the top of a stairwell, it works perfectly when a person is going down. However, when going up, the sensor does not "see" you until you are almost at the top of the stairs. Maybe a mirror will solve this problem.Installation instructions and diagrams for 3-way are not clear because Lutron has crammed too much multi-lingual information onto one sheet of paper. I was unable to get it to function as a true 3-way switch. 3Highly Recommended I have the 250w single pole (MS-OPS2-WH) and the 600w 3-way (MS-OPS5M-WH), so this review is for both.I've had these for about a month and I am very happy with them. I put one in an entry way and it is very convenient when walking in at night. I put the other one in a laundry room and that works well when carrying the laundry in.I'm no electrician, but they were easy for me to install. Just follow the instructions and be sure you understand everything you're doing. If you don't understand, watch more youtube videos or hire an electrician. I bought a non-contact voltage tester (fluke brand) to be sure that there was no current in any of the lines while I was working on them. You will also probably need a new switch plate. These do require a ground wire, so check that you have one in the switch box before buying. This is usually a bare copper wire. If you don't have one, this switch may not be worth the hassle of getting one put in.I have them set to auto on and auto off after 1 minute. They always come on right when I enter the room and I've never seen one turn on without someone in the room. One of them is pointed towards a window that has trees blowing in the wind and birds flying by, so it is just the right sensitivity. The sensitivity can be changed to a lower level from the default. They can also be changed to manual on and auto off for situations where you still want to control the light, but want to make sure it is not left on.They are supposed to not turn on if there is enough sunlight, but I have not experienced this. They turn on every time. The rooms I have them in don't get much sunlight, so maybe it just thinks they are always dark enough. It is also supposed to learn how much sunlight is too much by you manually turning it off, but I haven't noticed that either. Maybe they just need more time.There is an audible click when they turn on and off. It is not much louder than flipping a normal light switch. I believe this is because they use a relay to turn the power on and off. This is good because some other brands use a technique that still sends a small amount of current to the light when turned off. This usually causes issues with fluorescent and LED lights. This is not a problem with the Lutron switches and they should work with all lights. I am using them with CFL's and larger florescent lights without any problems.MS-OPS2-WH specific information:This is the one you want if your light is operated by one switch and is less than 250 watts. Besides being cheaper, the on/off click is slightly quieter than the 600w switch.MS-OPS5M-WH specific information:This is for 3-way (two switches for one light) and/or more than 250w, but less than 600w. I used this one to retain the operation of the other regular switch, even though it doesn t get used anymore. To add this into a 3-way set up, you will need an additional wire nut that is not included for the regular switch. One tip for testing it: You can not use the test setting (15 second timeout) to test the operation of regular switch. Once you use either switch, it resets back to five minutes. You may get some odd behavior if you try using the motion sensor at the same time as the regular switch, but for the most part, either switch can turn the light on or off. As mentioned above, the on/off click is slightly louder than the 250w switch. Some other reviewers have had success with using two of these switches in a 3-way setup, but it is not officially supported. 5Will work with mechanical 3-way ONLY with 2 switches, not 3 or more I bought two of these switches, one for a hallway that has a switch on each end (the far end can see all of the short hallway, so a single occupancy sensor there works just fine) and one for a hallway with three switches - at the entrance to the hallway, and at each of the bedroom doors (yes, the builders of this house loved their four-way switches!)The first switch went in easy as can be, simply following the directions on the box. The only caveat is that in the remaining mechanical three-way switch, where it wants you to join the black "in" and the black "out", it does not provide a large wire nut to do so. I had a wire nut and so could just use my own. An alternate method would be to wire both the in and the out to the single screw if it does, as mine does, support two equal-sized wires going in. Either way, it wasn't a significant hiccup in installation. I spent more time trying to pop wires out of the simple insert-in-hole quick wire pieces of the switch I needed to remove than in wiring the new one in.On the second, I had thought I would be able to use the existing mechanical three-way and four-way switches, but after wiring everything together realized that half of the combinations would never work no matter how the two switches were wired together. So, long story short, if you have three or more switches on a single light load, you WILL need to replace ALL the other switches with "Maestro Companion" switches. One piece of good news that I found is that while the "dimmer" companion switches are inexplicably $10 cheaper both here on Amazon and at my local Home Depot, the "dimmer" companion switches work just fine with the non-dimming occupancy sensor master switch (this puppy). At some point I might replace this second sensor with a dimming sensor and move this sensor to a different room or hallway, and will still end up significantly ahead.With this wiring setup in place, I set the occupancy sensor to one-minute timeout, auto-on with daylight sensing, and everything works beautifully.The instructions for the companion sensors indicate that the "master" switch can be located in any of the existing switches - replacing the "mains end" 3-way, replacing the "load end" 3-way, or replacing any of the 4-way switches in between. I replaced one of the two three-way switches with the master switch and the companions went to the other end and the four-way.- Actual Review -I actually bought two of these, one for use in a standard two-switch hallway, and one for use in the above-described three-switch hallway. The two-switch installation was quick and simple, simply following the directions on the included instruction sheet. I did find that there was one fewer large wire nut in the packaging than was actually needed to alter the "standard switch" to perform to spec (all three large nuts were used in installing the new switch, and one more was needed to alter the old switch), but that is a minor oversight. Just plan ahead and have an extra large wire nut handy when installing (or jump the black traveler to main using a different approach).In both cases, once installed, setup was very simple. I wanted auto-on/auto-off with daylight sensing on both, and with high motion sensitivity. Before putting the face plate back on (but with power on), as per the instructions I held the "second" button (the little button to the right of the switch which is hidden when the face plate is installed) until the sensor light blinked three times, and they were set to have daylight sensing enabled. I then held the main button (the light switch button itself) until it blinked twice to set the auto-off timer to one minute (the shortest duration) so the hallway lights turn off soon after people have left the hallway.These are our fifth and sixth Lutron occupancy sensors (the other four were simple two-way switches for rooms), and they have all been very reliable for us. The switch itself is less garish than some occupancy sensors, and generally looks just fine in the multi-gang decora switch boxes that are throughout the house.Easy install; flawless operation; feature set which matches our needs. I can't take any stars away, so this gets five stars. 53-way Light Switch for Dummies (like me) Finding the right switch was like a search for the Holy Grail. I installed 2 different switches in 2 different ways for each trying to make it work. Major issue was trying to figure out what switch to buy, so I will lay it out in a very simple "Electrical Connections for Dummies" kind of way.Disclaimer: the wiring in your home may be different from mine, so please use this advice at your own risk.My situation: Laundry room leading to the garage with doored entrance on both ends. 2 switches, one on each end of the laundry room.My want: To have the laundry room light turn on automatically when I enter the laundry room from the garage or from the house and turn off automatically after a couple of minutesThe solution: This switch and the below instructions1. Turn off your power to the switches at the fuse box2. Take off all the wires from both switches and separate them. My switch has 4 wires: 2 black (1-hot, 1-traveler), 1 red (traveler) and 1 bare wire (ground) Note: If you have white wires in there, then those should be your neutral wires and should already be tied off to another white neutral to complete the circuit (don't worry about these)3. Buy a hot wire detector (like this one: http://www.amazon.com/Fluke-1AC-A1-II-Volt-Alert-Non-Contact-Voltage/dp/B000EJ332O/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1336776918&sr=8-1) from Amazon. I bought one at Home Depot for about $14.4. Turn on power to the switches at the fuse box - please make sure that nobody is going to come wandering in and touch the open wires5. Take the hot wire detector and place it near every wire from both switches. Once you find the hot wire, then label it as "hot". This is the wire that is connected to your fuse box, and this is where you HAVE TO connect the regular switch. You CANNOT put the Motion switch on this end - Update: Someone commented that you can, but just stating what the installation instructions showed in the diagram.6. Turn off your power to the switches again at the fuse box7. Take the "hot" wire and screw-tap with one of the travelers which you will label as "Traveler A"8. Turn on your power to the switches at the fuse box9. Use hot wire detector to find the live traveler wire on the other end (where the motion switch will go)10. Label that live wire as "Traveler A"11. Turn off your power to the switches at the fuse box12. Repeat step 7-10 for the other traveler wire but label wires as "Traveler B"13. The remaining wire at the Motion switch end is the "load" wire that connects to the laundry room light14. From here you should be able to follow the instructions of the Motion light switch fairly easily. Only thing that may seem confusing is connecting the wires at the regular switch - you have to take the separate wire included with the motion switch and connect that to the black screw of the regular switch and then screw-tap it with the "hot" wire and one of the traveler wires. After that, the motion switch connections are straightforward.This switch allows you to do the following:- Adjust motion detection sensitivity (regular and extra-sensitive)- Adjust time to auto off (15 seconds, 1 minute, 5 minutes, 15 minutes and 30 minutes - can't remember exact increments since I only wanted 1 minute).- Make it auto-on (what I needed) or manual-on switch with auto-off- Turn off the lights manually either at the regular switch end or on the motion switch end, and it will reset itself for auto-on (takes about 20 seconds to reset itself)- Able to use with CFL or better known as fluorescent bulbs - which is what I have.Great switch and fits my needs perfectly. I have found the Holy Grail.Good Luck!UPDATE 4/8/13: Well, it's been about a year since I installed this switch, and it is still working like a charm. Very sensitive motion detector which is what I wanted so it will instantly turn on upon entry from the house or from the garage. One of the better home improvement projects that I have done. The other ones are timer switches on my bathroom exhaust fans. It's these little things that make your house a home. I am glad this review helped some people out there since it aggravated me to no end spending many hours trying to get the right switch to work. Will keep the light on for you.....or not.UPDATE 9/8/15: Still running like a champ after over 3 years in service. Some have asked about being able to install the motion detectors on both ends (i.e. at bottom and top of stairs). Unfortunately, I am not an electrician which is why my review was more for electrical dummies like me; thus, I cannot advise or recommend doing anything custom with these switches. I only "go by the book" with my home's wiring since I am too chicken to risk burning my home to the ground. For those who are certified electricians and can advise on these custom questions, then please help a brother / sister out. Peace, love and.......light.UPDATE 12/18/16: Still running and working as installed over 4 years ago. Switched my bulbs from CFLs to LEDs since the CFLs seems to burnout quickly with the repeated on/off in this high-traffic area. I can confirm that it works fine with LED bulbs also, and the LEDs last much longer (have not needed to change either of the 2 bulbs for the last 6 months). Merry Christmas to all! 5Works pretty good, less than 180 degree field of "view" We installed this in our garage with the intent of turning on the overhead garage lights when the garage door is opened. The 60 watt bulb in the garage door opener is just not bright enough.This works quite well. The switch was super easy to install, easy to adjust, and does exactly what it is supposed to do ... automatically turn on and off the garage lights.Sensor distance is quite good, can see movement from about 20 feet away, with little difficulties, and can see fairly minor movements (waving of a hand). However, the field of view is a bit below 180 degrees.Our experience has been that we only get about 130 degrees of sensing, so movement along the wall where the switch is installed is not detected. Which means that our garage door (which is just about 130 degrees from the sensor) does not trigger the sensor when the door is opened -- the primary reason for installing this sensor.Will probably replace with a dual sensor (ultrasonic/infrared) to see if that better meets our needs as the sensor only works after we've entered the garage and that doesn't quite meet our goal of having the bright overhead lights on before we pull cars, bikes, etc. into the garage in the dark. 4Far too sensitive for my anticipated application but found work-around I originally intended to put this on an in-closet switch that was visible to the rest of the bedoom and a wall switch prior to entering a utility room that lights that room.Problem was that even the lowest sensitivity range on the sensor is super sensitive and it'll pop the light on when I am very far away and/or at a wide angle from the switch. I wish it had some way of adjusting to be less sensitive and only come on when you are within, say, 5 feet of the switch. It does work well in large rooms and places like bathrooms where the switch isn't facing the doorway. Installation on 3 way switches is a bit more involved but straightforward if you have electrical DIY experience. Have not had any issues with functionality with 3 way switches.Work-around: White electrical tape over part of the sensor can help prevent it from picking you up when you don't want to trigger the switch.Minor annoyances:1) To set the sensitivity or the mode type you have to remove the wall plate to reach the button.2) Makes an audible popping sound when lights turn on. This doesn't bother me but I could see how it might bother some.3) Doesn't perfectly fit a generic rocker wall plate. There is a small but noticeable gap. I am not OCD enough to mind, but it might annoy some people. 4Installed six, including some in pairs My in-law has had a number of falls due to mobility issues, sometimes due to tripping. The arrangement of my in-law's house meant that they had to walk in the dark to reach some of the hallway switches. There was also concern about the lighting of the stairs.I installed two of these in hallways(*) so that the hallways are lit as soon as somebody enters, and used four (two pairs) for the staircases, one each at the top and bottom, to guarantee that the stair lights were on when they were used.The devices are not intended to be used at both ends of a 3-way wiring (supposed to be one sensor, and the other end a mechanical switch), but wired in parallel, they have worked flawlessly for the week since I installed them. Your milage may vary --- this is not the manufacturer's suggested usage.I had bought a pair for one L-shaped hallway, but was unable to install both because the hallway lights were switched from three locations. I suspect it would work with three sensors wired in parallel, same as the stairs, but didn't have a third sensor to install. Instead I wired it as a sensor + switch (disabling the middle switch, which isn't needed since the sensor covers that location).For the lights controlled by two sensors you can not use the "daylight" mode --- when the first sensor turns on the light (in the dark), the other sensor, seeing the light it didn't turn on, decides it's daylight and won't trip. Once a sensor has decided there is daylight it takes a few minutes of darkness before it will turn on the light again. Darkness was the problem I was trying to solve, so no daylight mode.--------------------(*) For these two locations where the light was controlled by a single switch, using the alternative model that isn't 3-way capable would have been a cheaper option.I have three of that single-location model installed in my own home (installed four years ago), and I'm happy with them. In my own home I installed two for similar reasons (had to walk through the dark to reach the switch) and one to deal with a light that was routinely left on in an empty room, set in occupancy mode: You must manually turn on the light as before, and then the sensor turns it off when there is no motion. 5It works; no neutral needed only ground wire What I didn't realize was that you can not use two of these in sync to control a fixture. I tried it and the lights acted "crazy"; turning on and off by themselves. A call to tech support confirmed this. I wished they had clearly stated this on their instruction sheet. So for a 3-way setup only one motion sensor can be used. Unfortunate as I have a hallway chandelier controlled by a switch up stair and down stair. The tech said the only way around this was to use their wireless motion sensor switch; i'm not even sure they offer this on Amazon. Otherwise, this switch works when wired properly. One common, two travelers and a pair of ground. I wished they offered more delay time between the one to five minute settings; three minute would have been good. It does make a clicking sound when motion is detected but is not too bothersome. It's a good buy; I recommend it. 4
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Customer Reviews

3 WAY Instructions and Diagram: DOES Work Confirmed Update: Aug 1st 2013: Added caveat to clarify what will NOT work, formatted for easy read and to think why this has so few votes :-). Does not matter as long as this helps anyone and thats the reason we write review(s) and share information.Journey/Failures:I had been unsuccessfully playing with Leviton's ODS-10-id to create a multi-location sensor, example across the staircase, while Leviton set-up works but due to unknown reasons to me or to Leviton's Support, sensors switch on lights even in bright day, really bright. So I had been looking for an alternate solution.Solution with Caveat:Lutron does not publish or even their support declines the multi-location occupancy sensor. I did post a picture for wiring diagram as "to be tested" but I can confirm now as "it DOES WORK". Caveat is that both the switches need to timeout or manually shut off to switch off the light/load. Other than that it automates everything for you, I never had a need to switch off lights manually so far in past 1 year+.HOW TO:Again, please do refer to my diagram as well. So for wiring for a 3-way, as you already know, there are two sides. One side uses the line/hot known as HOT SIDE and other one has the wire that goes to load known as LEG/LOAD SIDE. Both sides are connected to each other via TWO Traveler wires.How to find HOT: Switch off breaker, open box, disconnect all wires from existing switch, Switch on breaker, check line/power, mark hot wire, switch off and proceed with sensor connectivityHOT SIDE (refer diagram)========Line/HOT - Black (top) of Sensor + Traveler Wire ATraveler B - Black (bottom)Bare Copper Ground - Bare silver + GreenLEG SIDE========Traveler A - Black (top) of SensorTraveler B - Black (Bottom) + LoadBare Copper Ground - Bare silver + GreenBlue - Not connected in both sidesDISCLAIMER: Did work for me and may/may_not work for you depending on wiring etc. I am just an engineer and a homeowner with passion for automation and absolutely not an Electrician. When in doubt "please" call a LICENSED authority known as Electrician.Happy to answer any questions as always. The picture I posted, with colored wires, to ensure clarity although resolution is not so great after Amazon conversion. For high resolution leave an email address and will send you link from my personal cloud for clear printable pdf file. 5Works Perfectly Great switch. We've actually used it to make a set of carport lights automatically activate when a car pulls in. I needed this kind of switch because the previous wiring was set with TWO switches, and on always taking priority (so not three way, just two separate opportunities to close the circuit in the on position). This let me maintain the one normal on/off switch while ALSO having it turn on whenever a car pulls in from the motion. Just make sure to protect it from the elements if you plan to use it this way, it is NOT weather proof, and you could end up with a dangerous situation due to corrosion and the like if you do not take proper precautions. 5If it works for you, you'll be happy In the right spot, this switch may be a great solution, but it has limitations in a stairwell. The motion sensor is wide-angle, but almost entirely on the horizontal. So, with the switch at the top of a stairwell, it works perfectly when a person is going down. However, when going up, the sensor does not "see" you until you are almost at the top of the stairs. Maybe a mirror will solve this problem.Installation instructions and diagrams for 3-way are not clear because Lutron has crammed too much multi-lingual information onto one sheet of paper. I was unable to get it to function as a true 3-way switch. 3Highly Recommended I have the 250w single pole (MS-OPS2-WH) and the 600w 3-way (MS-OPS5M-WH), so this review is for both.I've had these for about a month and I am very happy with them. I put one in an entry way and it is very convenient when walking in at night. I put the other one in a laundry room and that works well when carrying the laundry in.I'm no electrician, but they were easy for me to install. Just follow the instructions and be sure you understand everything you're doing. If you don't understand, watch more youtube videos or hire an electrician. I bought a non-contact voltage tester (fluke brand) to be sure that there was no current in any of the lines while I was working on them. You will also probably need a new switch plate. These do require a ground wire, so check that you have one in the switch box before buying. This is usually a bare copper wire. If you don't have one, this switch may not be worth the hassle of getting one put in.I have them set to auto on and auto off after 1 minute. They always come on right when I enter the room and I've never seen one turn on without someone in the room. One of them is pointed towards a window that has trees blowing in the wind and birds flying by, so it is just the right sensitivity. The sensitivity can be changed to a lower level from the default. They can also be changed to manual on and auto off for situations where you still want to control the light, but want to make sure it is not left on.They are supposed to not turn on if there is enough sunlight, but I have not experienced this. They turn on every time. The rooms I have them in don't get much sunlight, so maybe it just thinks they are always dark enough. It is also supposed to learn how much sunlight is too much by you manually turning it off, but I haven't noticed that either. Maybe they just need more time.There is an audible click when they turn on and off. It is not much louder than flipping a normal light switch. I believe this is because they use a relay to turn the power on and off. This is good because some other brands use a technique that still sends a small amount of current to the light when turned off. This usually causes issues with fluorescent and LED lights. This is not a problem with the Lutron switches and they should work with all lights. I am using them with CFL's and larger florescent lights without any problems.MS-OPS2-WH specific information:This is the one you want if your light is operated by one switch and is less than 250 watts. Besides being cheaper, the on/off click is slightly quieter than the 600w switch.MS-OPS5M-WH specific information:This is for 3-way (two switches for one light) and/or more than 250w, but less than 600w. I used this one to retain the operation of the other regular switch, even though it doesn t get used anymore. To add this into a 3-way set up, you will need an additional wire nut that is not included for the regular switch. One tip for testing it: You can not use the test setting (15 second timeout) to test the operation of regular switch. Once you use either switch, it resets back to five minutes. You may get some odd behavior if you try using the motion sensor at the same time as the regular switch, but for the most part, either switch can turn the light on or off. As mentioned above, the on/off click is slightly louder than the 250w switch. Some other reviewers have had success with using two of these switches in a 3-way setup, but it is not officially supported. 5Will work with mechanical 3-way ONLY with 2 switches, not 3 or more I bought two of these switches, one for a hallway that has a switch on each end (the far end can see all of the short hallway, so a single occupancy sensor there works just fine) and one for a hallway with three switches - at the entrance to the hallway, and at each of the bedroom doors (yes, the builders of this house loved their four-way switches!)The first switch went in easy as can be, simply following the directions on the box. The only caveat is that in the remaining mechanical three-way switch, where it wants you to join the black "in" and the black "out", it does not provide a large wire nut to do so. I had a wire nut and so could just use my own. An alternate method would be to wire both the in and the out to the single screw if it does, as mine does, support two equal-sized wires going in. Either way, it wasn't a significant hiccup in installation. I spent more time trying to pop wires out of the simple insert-in-hole quick wire pieces of the switch I needed to remove than in wiring the new one in.On the second, I had thought I would be able to use the existing mechanical three-way and four-way switches, but after wiring everything together realized that half of the combinations would never work no matter how the two switches were wired together. So, long story short, if you have three or more switches on a single light load, you WILL need to replace ALL the other switches with "Maestro Companion" switches. One piece of good news that I found is that while the "dimmer" companion switches are inexplicably $10 cheaper both here on Amazon and at my local Home Depot, the "dimmer" companion switches work just fine with the non-dimming occupancy sensor master switch (this puppy). At some point I might replace this second sensor with a dimming sensor and move this sensor to a different room or hallway, and will still end up significantly ahead.With this wiring setup in place, I set the occupancy sensor to one-minute timeout, auto-on with daylight sensing, and everything works beautifully.The instructions for the companion sensors indicate that the "master" switch can be located in any of the existing switches - replacing the "mains end" 3-way, replacing the "load end" 3-way, or replacing any of the 4-way switches in between. I replaced one of the two three-way switches with the master switch and the companions went to the other end and the four-way.- Actual Review -I actually bought two of these, one for use in a standard two-switch hallway, and one for use in the above-described three-switch hallway. The two-switch installation was quick and simple, simply following the directions on the included instruction sheet. I did find that there was one fewer large wire nut in the packaging than was actually needed to alter the "standard switch" to perform to spec (all three large nuts were used in installing the new switch, and one more was needed to alter the old switch), but that is a minor oversight. Just plan ahead and have an extra large wire nut handy when installing (or jump the black traveler to main using a different approach).In both cases, once installed, setup was very simple. I wanted auto-on/auto-off with daylight sensing on both, and with high motion sensitivity. Before putting the face plate back on (but with power on), as per the instructions I held the "second" button (the little button to the right of the switch which is hidden when the face plate is installed) until the sensor light blinked three times, and they were set to have daylight sensing enabled. I then held the main button (the light switch button itself) until it blinked twice to set the auto-off timer to one minute (the shortest duration) so the hallway lights turn off soon after people have left the hallway.These are our fifth and sixth Lutron occupancy sensors (the other four were simple two-way switches for rooms), and they have all been very reliable for us. The switch itself is less garish than some occupancy sensors, and generally looks just fine in the multi-gang decora switch boxes that are throughout the house.Easy install; flawless operation; feature set which matches our needs. I can't take any stars away, so this gets five stars. 53-way Light Switch for Dummies (like me) Finding the right switch was like a search for the Holy Grail. I installed 2 different switches in 2 different ways for each trying to make it work. Major issue was trying to figure out what switch to buy, so I will lay it out in a very simple "Electrical Connections for Dummies" kind of way.Disclaimer: the wiring in your home may be different from mine, so please use this advice at your own risk.My situation: Laundry room leading to the garage with doored entrance on both ends. 2 switches, one on each end of the laundry room.My want: To have the laundry room light turn on automatically when I enter the laundry room from the garage or from the house and turn off automatically after a couple of minutesThe solution: This switch and the below instructions1. Turn off your power to the switches at the fuse box2. Take off all the wires from both switches and separate them. My switch has 4 wires: 2 black (1-hot, 1-traveler), 1 red (traveler) and 1 bare wire (ground) Note: If you have white wires in there, then those should be your neutral wires and should already be tied off to another white neutral to complete the circuit (don't worry about these)3. Buy a hot wire detector (like this one: http://www.amazon.com/Fluke-1AC-A1-II-Volt-Alert-Non-Contact-Voltage/dp/B000EJ332O/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1336776918&sr=8-1) from Amazon. I bought one at Home Depot for about $14.4. Turn on power to the switches at the fuse box - please make sure that nobody is going to come wandering in and touch the open wires5. Take the hot wire detector and place it near every wire from both switches. Once you find the hot wire, then label it as "hot". This is the wire that is connected to your fuse box, and this is where you HAVE TO connect the regular switch. You CANNOT put the Motion switch on this end - Update: Someone commented that you can, but just stating what the installation instructions showed in the diagram.6. Turn off your power to the switches again at the fuse box7. Take the "hot" wire and screw-tap with one of the travelers which you will label as "Traveler A"8. Turn on your power to the switches at the fuse box9. Use hot wire detector to find the live traveler wire on the other end (where the motion switch will go)10. Label that live wire as "Traveler A"11. Turn off your power to the switches at the fuse box12. Repeat step 7-10 for the other traveler wire but label wires as "Traveler B"13. The remaining wire at the Motion switch end is the "load" wire that connects to the laundry room light14. From here you should be able to follow the instructions of the Motion light switch fairly easily. Only thing that may seem confusing is connecting the wires at the regular switch - you have to take the separate wire included with the motion switch and connect that to the black screw of the regular switch and then screw-tap it with the "hot" wire and one of the traveler wires. After that, the motion switch connections are straightforward.This switch allows you to do the following:- Adjust motion detection sensitivity (regular and extra-sensitive)- Adjust time to auto off (15 seconds, 1 minute, 5 minutes, 15 minutes and 30 minutes - can't remember exact increments since I only wanted 1 minute).- Make it auto-on (what I needed) or manual-on switch with auto-off- Turn off the lights manually either at the regular switch end or on the motion switch end, and it will reset itself for auto-on (takes about 20 seconds to reset itself)- Able to use with CFL or better known as fluorescent bulbs - which is what I have.Great switch and fits my needs perfectly. I have found the Holy Grail.Good Luck!UPDATE 4/8/13: Well, it's been about a year since I installed this switch, and it is still working like a charm. Very sensitive motion detector which is what I wanted so it will instantly turn on upon entry from the house or from the garage. One of the better home improvement projects that I have done. The other ones are timer switches on my bathroom exhaust fans. It's these little things that make your house a home. I am glad this review helped some people out there since it aggravated me to no end spending many hours trying to get the right switch to work. Will keep the light on for you.....or not.UPDATE 9/8/15: Still running like a champ after over 3 years in service. Some have asked about being able to install the motion detectors on both ends (i.e. at bottom and top of stairs). Unfortunately, I am not an electrician which is why my review was more for electrical dummies like me; thus, I cannot advise or recommend doing anything custom with these switches. I only "go by the book" with my home's wiring since I am too chicken to risk burning my home to the ground. For those who are certified electricians and can advise on these custom questions, then please help a brother / sister out. Peace, love and.......light.UPDATE 12/18/16: Still running and working as installed over 4 years ago. Switched my bulbs from CFLs to LEDs since the CFLs seems to burnout quickly with the repeated on/off in this high-traffic area. I can confirm that it works fine with LED bulbs also, and the LEDs last much longer (have not needed to change either of the 2 bulbs for the last 6 months). Merry Christmas to all! 5Works pretty good, less than 180 degree field of "view" We installed this in our garage with the intent of turning on the overhead garage lights when the garage door is opened. The 60 watt bulb in the garage door opener is just not bright enough.This works quite well. The switch was super easy to install, easy to adjust, and does exactly what it is supposed to do ... automatically turn on and off the garage lights.Sensor distance is quite good, can see movement from about 20 feet away, with little difficulties, and can see fairly minor movements (waving of a hand). However, the field of view is a bit below 180 degrees.Our experience has been that we only get about 130 degrees of sensing, so movement along the wall where the switch is installed is not detected. Which means that our garage door (which is just about 130 degrees from the sensor) does not trigger the sensor when the door is opened -- the primary reason for installing this sensor.Will probably replace with a dual sensor (ultrasonic/infrared) to see if that better meets our needs as the sensor only works after we've entered the garage and that doesn't quite meet our goal of having the bright overhead lights on before we pull cars, bikes, etc. into the garage in the dark. 4Far too sensitive for my anticipated application but found work-around I originally intended to put this on an in-closet switch that was visible to the rest of the bedoom and a wall switch prior to entering a utility room that lights that room.Problem was that even the lowest sensitivity range on the sensor is super sensitive and it'll pop the light on when I am very far away and/or at a wide angle from the switch. I wish it had some way of adjusting to be less sensitive and only come on when you are within, say, 5 feet of the switch. It does work well in large rooms and places like bathrooms where the switch isn't facing the doorway. Installation on 3 way switches is a bit more involved but straightforward if you have electrical DIY experience. Have not had any issues with functionality with 3 way switches.Work-around: White electrical tape over part of the sensor can help prevent it from picking you up when you don't want to trigger the switch.Minor annoyances:1) To set the sensitivity or the mode type you have to remove the wall plate to reach the button.2) Makes an audible popping sound when lights turn on. This doesn't bother me but I could see how it might bother some.3) Doesn't perfectly fit a generic rocker wall plate. There is a small but noticeable gap. I am not OCD enough to mind, but it might annoy some people. 4Installed six, including some in pairs My in-law has had a number of falls due to mobility issues, sometimes due to tripping. The arrangement of my in-law's house meant that they had to walk in the dark to reach some of the hallway switches. There was also concern about the lighting of the stairs.I installed two of these in hallways(*) so that the hallways are lit as soon as somebody enters, and used four (two pairs) for the staircases, one each at the top and bottom, to guarantee that the stair lights were on when they were used.The devices are not intended to be used at both ends of a 3-way wiring (supposed to be one sensor, and the other end a mechanical switch), but wired in parallel, they have worked flawlessly for the week since I installed them. Your milage may vary --- this is not the manufacturer's suggested usage.I had bought a pair for one L-shaped hallway, but was unable to install both because the hallway lights were switched from three locations. I suspect it would work with three sensors wired in parallel, same as the stairs, but didn't have a third sensor to install. Instead I wired it as a sensor + switch (disabling the middle switch, which isn't needed since the sensor covers that location).For the lights controlled by two sensors you can not use the "daylight" mode --- when the first sensor turns on the light (in the dark), the other sensor, seeing the light it didn't turn on, decides it's daylight and won't trip. Once a sensor has decided there is daylight it takes a few minutes of darkness before it will turn on the light again. Darkness was the problem I was trying to solve, so no daylight mode.--------------------(*) For these two locations where the light was controlled by a single switch, using the alternative model that isn't 3-way capable would have been a cheaper option.I have three of that single-location model installed in my own home (installed four years ago), and I'm happy with them. In my own home I installed two for similar reasons (had to walk through the dark to reach the switch) and one to deal with a light that was routinely left on in an empty room, set in occupancy mode: You must manually turn on the light as before, and then the sensor turns it off when there is no motion. 5It works; no neutral needed only ground wire What I didn't realize was that you can not use two of these in sync to control a fixture. I tried it and the lights acted "crazy"; turning on and off by themselves. A call to tech support confirmed this. I wished they had clearly stated this on their instruction sheet. So for a 3-way setup only one motion sensor can be used. Unfortunate as I have a hallway chandelier controlled by a switch up stair and down stair. The tech said the only way around this was to use their wireless motion sensor switch; i'm not even sure they offer this on Amazon. Otherwise, this switch works when wired properly. One common, two travelers and a pair of ground. I wished they offered more delay time between the one to five minute settings; three minute would have been good. It does make a clicking sound when motion is detected but is not too bothersome. It's a good buy; I recommend it. 4
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