• Lightdow 12 x 12 Inch (30 x 30 cm) White Balance 18% Gray Reference Reflector Grey Card with Carry Bag [Folded Version]
  • Lightdow 12 x 12 Inch (30 x 30 cm) White Balance 18% Gray Reference Reflector Grey Card with Carry Bag [Folded Version]
  • Lightdow 12 x 12 Inch (30 x 30 cm) White Balance 18% Gray Reference Reflector Grey Card with Carry Bag [Folded Version]
  • Lightdow 12 x 12 Inch (30 x 30 cm) White Balance 18% Gray Reference Reflector Grey Card with Carry Bag [Folded Version]
  • Lightdow 12 x 12 Inch (30 x 30 cm) White Balance 18% Gray Reference Reflector Grey Card with Carry Bag [Folded Version]
  • Lightdow 12 x 12 Inch (30 x 30 cm) White Balance 18% Gray Reference Reflector Grey Card with Carry Bag [Folded Version]
  • Lightdow 12 x 12 Inch (30 x 30 cm) White Balance 18% Gray Reference Reflector Grey Card with Carry Bag [Folded Version]
Lightdow 12 x 12 Inch (30 x 30 cm) White Balance 18% Gray Reference Reflector Grey Card with Carry Bag [Folded Version]
Lightdow 12 x 12 Inch (30 x 30 cm) White Balance 18% Gray Reference Reflector Grey Card with Carry Bag [Folded Version]
Lightdow 12 x 12 Inch (30 x 30 cm) White Balance 18% Gray Reference Reflector Grey Card with Carry Bag [Folded Version]
Lightdow 12 x 12 Inch (30 x 30 cm) White Balance 18% Gray Reference Reflector Grey Card with Carry Bag [Folded Version]
Lightdow 12 x 12 Inch (30 x 30 cm) White Balance 18% Gray Reference Reflector Grey Card with Carry Bag [Folded Version]
Lightdow 12 x 12 Inch (30 x 30 cm) White Balance 18% Gray Reference Reflector Grey Card with Carry Bag [Folded Version]
Lightdow 12 x 12 Inch (30 x 30 cm) White Balance 18% Gray Reference Reflector Grey Card with Carry Bag [Folded Version]

Lightdow 12 x 12 Inch (30 x 30 cm) White Balance 18% Gray Reference Reflector Grey Card with Carry Bag [Folded Version]

Sale price
MRP: €36,00
Regular price
€60,00
Unit price
per 
( 40% off )
Quantity:
Expected Delivery: 21-28 days
Import Duties to be borne by the customer at the time of delivery.
Product price is exclusive of such duties.

Tracked Shipping

Secure Payments

10 Days Return

Tracked Shipping

Secure Payments

10 Days Return

  • Gray side: Reflectance 17.8%; Density 0.74
  • for Max. deviation of reflectance: 2%
  • for Max. error in exposure measurements: 1/8 of F-stop
  • This handy double sided pop up 18% grey/white card simplifies the complex technical issues surrounding exposure and color correction when working in different lighting conditions. It provides a major benefit when working under pressure at events such as weddings or fashion shows.
  • Backed with Lightdow 90-Day Hassle Free Return & Replacement Warranty for Quality-Related Issue.

Customer Reviews

Nifty Product - Read on for how to get it to fold correctly! This a clever little product that meets my need perfectly. I used mine to perform custom white balancing in the field on my Nikon D600. It came in a small zip bag and pops open when you take it out. I mean Pop! It weighs like a feather and it's cloth over wire frame construction means it's very easy to set up against a tree or whatever in the field, set white balance, then pack it away. So it's both compact and under 4 oz., great for your gear bag in the field. The wire frame makes it less likely than a piece of gray card to blow away. The cloth means it's possibly cleanable as well. Just what I wanted for the field! Light, cheap, reliable, practical. My D600 read the grey face but not the white face.Here's how to fold it back up so it'll fit back into the pouch: Note that it is roughly rectangular with 4 corners. With both hands pinch two catty corners or opposite corners on the diagonal, doesn't matter which two as long as they're catty corner. Bring the 2 corners together so it's pinched together in the middle. You now have 2 corners together and it looks like a sort of butterfly shape. Holding the pinched corners with one hand, turn that hand inward towards you so the back of that hand faces away and the 2 "butterfly wings" face at you. Using your other hand bring the bottom wing up and into the middle so you can now pinch that lobe as well with the hand that has the middles pinched. Now holding all that with one hand, bring the other lobe over and down on top and, keeping it pinched bring it all together in the smallest size and slip it back into the pouch whilst keeping it all pinched together. A lot to write down for you, but do this once and it's a cinch forever! 5EASY TO FOLD - MAKES YOUR PHOTOS GREAT! WATCH VIDEO! Rather then tell you in words how great this White Balance tool is I made a video review showing the item, case, and how to fold it up. It is awesome and makes your photos and videos so much better when working in less than optimal lighting situations. Please like the review if you found it helpful. 5Works great and is small enough to travel with This was one of the best purchases I've made as an amateur photographer. If you do not yet understand white balance, please do your research. I've reduced my editing time so much and I actually notice the difference in the color correctness of my photos now.Pros:As far as the product goes, it twists up into a small 6x6 circle and comes with a zipper bag to store it at that size. Twisting it up like this on a regular basis does cause wrinkles in the card, however, I these wrinkles don't seem to affect its ability to white balance. The 12x12 size is great for travel shoots that require a lot of movement.Cons:Please note that 12x12 is not very large, so I find myself having to get very close to the card when using a prime lens in order to fill the whole viewfinder. I will likely buy a larger card for more professional (still) shoots. 5It's lightweight making it easy to tape to a target area or clip to ... This is a handy little assistant that will help you dial in the proper exposure on your waveform monitor. It's lightweight making it easy to tape to a target area or clip to a stand, and it's large enough that it will be easily discernible on medium range to close up shots. Have an interview subject hold it right beneath their face before you start rolling and you can dial in your exposure IRE for both 18% and skin tones.**REGARDING 18% GREY** - I tested this in comparison to another 18% grey card I own under known lighting conditions on my waveform monitor, and my version is, in fact, 18% grey. Some reviews claimed that theirs is not 18% grey. While I can't see what product they received to know if it was a manufacturing error or operator error, I can confirm that mine is 18% grey. Will you get the same results that you would from the $300 grey exposure cards? I don't know because I don't have $300 to spend on one of those. However, the reality is that if you know your camera, know how to read a waveform monitor, and know how to expose properly based upon what picture profile you are shooting (log or something else), then this will work for you and will make it easier to dial in shots than guessing or using a smaller solution. For the price, you can't beat it. 4Nice for the price. I wanted a card I could fold. I wanted something that could fold and place in my camera bag easily. This card does the job. Nothing fancy and the white marks in the center are painted not stitched as you might get with a higher priced card. One side is grey with the white markings and other is plain white. It's compact and inexpensive. Just one warning the "frame" is a bit thick to stiffen the card for use so it can be a bit awkward to fold. I have friends who for some reason just have a problem folding these type of things. It just takes a bit of practice but if you're one of those that can't do what I like to call the figure 8 fold then you might be better off with something like a Passport Color Checker that has a grey card area and just closes up into a plastic case. While it's more expensive as it has lots of color checker areas and comes with color correcting software you might be better off with it if you're not able to fold these type of cards. 5Once you figure out how to close it, it's great! Great white balance card that is easy to use once you get the hang of it.I finally figured out how to close it from a youtube video. Google "how to fold circular reflector" and you should be able to find a ton of videos or the link to the one I watched is below.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YjlsP9KDjcsA lot of people said you twist and then fold in half but all that did was bent the outer ring. What you want to do is:1 Hold it by two opposite corners2 Twist each side in the opposite direction, it should now look like a figure 83 Twist again and it should fold in on itself and make a perfect little circle to go back in its case. 5... level" Lastolite gray card in school which is a great product but I ended up purchasing this one I have used the "Pro level" Lastolite gray card in school which is a great product but I ended up purchasing this one. I figured for a quarter of the price of Lastolite product, what the heck I'll buy one less beer next week if it was trash. Well, it's not, it doesn't look as fancy as the Lastolite gray card but construction seems solid enough and I also compared the color of the two and found that they are both definitely the same 18% gray that you are looking for to get that white balance honed in. I should add that the carrying case for the Lightdow is made of pretty cheap thin nylon like material and the Lastolite has a more rugged canvas case....and since I'm so happy with the Lightdow, I am having that beer as I write this review. 5Accurate neutral gray First, functionality. It s a gray card, so I expect it to give me 18% neutral gray upon reflectance. And it did ever so easily. I included a couple of test pictures with Bambi. The first picture is indoor, with LED ceiling light on the soft toy. The second picture is when the white balance of the picture is corrected with the gray card. Not bad, isn t it? I shoot all my pictures in RAW format, and if you happen to use a Mac like I do, you can just load the photos into the Photos app on Mac, go to Edit, then Adjust, and the White Balance menu. Make sure that you select Temperature/Tint in the dropdown box, then click on the little dropper-like icon right beside the dropdown box, and then click on the gray card. It corrects the white balance using the gray card as a reference for neutral gray. Then you can simply copy and paste adjustments and correct the other pictures taken under the same lighting. Simple enough.The Lightdow graycard arrived in a round black polyester bag (about 4 inch in diameter), with a small hoop at the top of the bag for easy attachment to camera bag or backpack by a clip or a caribena. Though the graycard bag material does not convey any feeling of luxury (not that I care anyway), the zipper works very smoothly without any glitch I would typically expect of a poorly constructed bag.The gray card in itself measures about 12 inch by 12 inch when fully extended from its collapsed state in the bag. It is essentially a very soft, velvet like fabric wrapped around some rather flexible plastic scaffold (along the edges of the gray card). So to collapse it back into the bag, you just hold on to the opposite edges of the gray card, twist in opposite directions. Fairly easy, no surprises.Overall, I feel this is a better choice than the credit card sized gray cards, simply because it allows me to take a picture of the gray card without having to stick my lens right onto the smaller gray cards. 5Cheap, durable, accurate, compact. Can't get any better than that. For less than $10, every photographer should have one of these. The edge feels like a thin neoprene or lycra. The internal spring seems very strong and durable. The calibrated surface seems to be waterproof and is easily cleanable. The storage pouch is the perfect size. It's even got a loop on one end, so that you can hang it on something, so you don't need to hold it out in front of the camera. Well worth it.I took a quick set of sample shots in a poorly lit (several cheap CFL lights), messy room, showing Before and After setting custom white balance, using this product. 5Does what it's suppose to do cheaply Does what it suppose to do cheaply. I can set my White Balance within Rawtherapee or Nikon's raw image editor to a certain degree of accuracy, attaining better over all color throughout the default image. (Albeit using the previously mentioned tools, it is somewhat awkward to migrate white balance settings to and fro images. Rawtherapee adheres to pp3 files, while Nikon's raw image editor uses a separate preset menu.)However if you can afford the $80 X-Rite ColorChecker Passport Photo (MSCCPP), then purchase the X-Rite Passport instead as the X-Rite Passport tool has likely far better accurate color patches, multiple toned white patches, and 24+ color patches for color calibration. The X-Rite tool can also create a DCP profile for you camera, and creating DCP (eg. ICC) profiles is really required if using third party raw image editors. If you're satisfied with your camera manufacturer's raw image editor, then ignore the more expensive X-Rite tools and just use this cheaper grey patch for setting at least your white balance, making a surprisingly significant 60-80% difference in overall image color casts.If you're just playing around with TIFF/JPEG images or are on an extremely tight budget, then this cheaper tool will suffice.As for me, I additionally purchased the X-Rite Passport as I typically use Linux third party raw image editors (eg. Rawtherapee) and recently advised there is no default color profile submitted for the Nikon D5600 camera as of yet. I'm also seeing significant color inconsistencies between Rawtherapee and Nikon's raw image editors (eg. ViewNX-i, Capture NX-D, ...), although this grey patch did make significant synchronization results between the raw image editors, I'm still seeing some color anomalies and hoping the X-Rite Passport resolves these remaining anomalies.PROS1) Very affordable.2) Grey side does significantly aide setting a raw image's white balance within Rawtherapee or other raw image editors.3) Adequate if you use and are satisfied with your camera manufacturer's raw editor.CONS1) Not sure how long this Lightdow will last, in comparison to the X-Rite Passport.2) Limited application, only grey and white colored patches.3) The white side has significant threading texture, unlike the X-Rite color patches. 4
See All Reviews
Description
Description Description Description Description Description Description
Reviews

Customer Reviews

Nifty Product - Read on for how to get it to fold correctly! This a clever little product that meets my need perfectly. I used mine to perform custom white balancing in the field on my Nikon D600. It came in a small zip bag and pops open when you take it out. I mean Pop! It weighs like a feather and it's cloth over wire frame construction means it's very easy to set up against a tree or whatever in the field, set white balance, then pack it away. So it's both compact and under 4 oz., great for your gear bag in the field. The wire frame makes it less likely than a piece of gray card to blow away. The cloth means it's possibly cleanable as well. Just what I wanted for the field! Light, cheap, reliable, practical. My D600 read the grey face but not the white face.Here's how to fold it back up so it'll fit back into the pouch: Note that it is roughly rectangular with 4 corners. With both hands pinch two catty corners or opposite corners on the diagonal, doesn't matter which two as long as they're catty corner. Bring the 2 corners together so it's pinched together in the middle. You now have 2 corners together and it looks like a sort of butterfly shape. Holding the pinched corners with one hand, turn that hand inward towards you so the back of that hand faces away and the 2 "butterfly wings" face at you. Using your other hand bring the bottom wing up and into the middle so you can now pinch that lobe as well with the hand that has the middles pinched. Now holding all that with one hand, bring the other lobe over and down on top and, keeping it pinched bring it all together in the smallest size and slip it back into the pouch whilst keeping it all pinched together. A lot to write down for you, but do this once and it's a cinch forever! 5EASY TO FOLD - MAKES YOUR PHOTOS GREAT! WATCH VIDEO! Rather then tell you in words how great this White Balance tool is I made a video review showing the item, case, and how to fold it up. It is awesome and makes your photos and videos so much better when working in less than optimal lighting situations. Please like the review if you found it helpful. 5Works great and is small enough to travel with This was one of the best purchases I've made as an amateur photographer. If you do not yet understand white balance, please do your research. I've reduced my editing time so much and I actually notice the difference in the color correctness of my photos now.Pros:As far as the product goes, it twists up into a small 6x6 circle and comes with a zipper bag to store it at that size. Twisting it up like this on a regular basis does cause wrinkles in the card, however, I these wrinkles don't seem to affect its ability to white balance. The 12x12 size is great for travel shoots that require a lot of movement.Cons:Please note that 12x12 is not very large, so I find myself having to get very close to the card when using a prime lens in order to fill the whole viewfinder. I will likely buy a larger card for more professional (still) shoots. 5It's lightweight making it easy to tape to a target area or clip to ... This is a handy little assistant that will help you dial in the proper exposure on your waveform monitor. It's lightweight making it easy to tape to a target area or clip to a stand, and it's large enough that it will be easily discernible on medium range to close up shots. Have an interview subject hold it right beneath their face before you start rolling and you can dial in your exposure IRE for both 18% and skin tones.**REGARDING 18% GREY** - I tested this in comparison to another 18% grey card I own under known lighting conditions on my waveform monitor, and my version is, in fact, 18% grey. Some reviews claimed that theirs is not 18% grey. While I can't see what product they received to know if it was a manufacturing error or operator error, I can confirm that mine is 18% grey. Will you get the same results that you would from the $300 grey exposure cards? I don't know because I don't have $300 to spend on one of those. However, the reality is that if you know your camera, know how to read a waveform monitor, and know how to expose properly based upon what picture profile you are shooting (log or something else), then this will work for you and will make it easier to dial in shots than guessing or using a smaller solution. For the price, you can't beat it. 4Nice for the price. I wanted a card I could fold. I wanted something that could fold and place in my camera bag easily. This card does the job. Nothing fancy and the white marks in the center are painted not stitched as you might get with a higher priced card. One side is grey with the white markings and other is plain white. It's compact and inexpensive. Just one warning the "frame" is a bit thick to stiffen the card for use so it can be a bit awkward to fold. I have friends who for some reason just have a problem folding these type of things. It just takes a bit of practice but if you're one of those that can't do what I like to call the figure 8 fold then you might be better off with something like a Passport Color Checker that has a grey card area and just closes up into a plastic case. While it's more expensive as it has lots of color checker areas and comes with color correcting software you might be better off with it if you're not able to fold these type of cards. 5Once you figure out how to close it, it's great! Great white balance card that is easy to use once you get the hang of it.I finally figured out how to close it from a youtube video. Google "how to fold circular reflector" and you should be able to find a ton of videos or the link to the one I watched is below.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YjlsP9KDjcsA lot of people said you twist and then fold in half but all that did was bent the outer ring. What you want to do is:1 Hold it by two opposite corners2 Twist each side in the opposite direction, it should now look like a figure 83 Twist again and it should fold in on itself and make a perfect little circle to go back in its case. 5... level" Lastolite gray card in school which is a great product but I ended up purchasing this one I have used the "Pro level" Lastolite gray card in school which is a great product but I ended up purchasing this one. I figured for a quarter of the price of Lastolite product, what the heck I'll buy one less beer next week if it was trash. Well, it's not, it doesn't look as fancy as the Lastolite gray card but construction seems solid enough and I also compared the color of the two and found that they are both definitely the same 18% gray that you are looking for to get that white balance honed in. I should add that the carrying case for the Lightdow is made of pretty cheap thin nylon like material and the Lastolite has a more rugged canvas case....and since I'm so happy with the Lightdow, I am having that beer as I write this review. 5Accurate neutral gray First, functionality. It s a gray card, so I expect it to give me 18% neutral gray upon reflectance. And it did ever so easily. I included a couple of test pictures with Bambi. The first picture is indoor, with LED ceiling light on the soft toy. The second picture is when the white balance of the picture is corrected with the gray card. Not bad, isn t it? I shoot all my pictures in RAW format, and if you happen to use a Mac like I do, you can just load the photos into the Photos app on Mac, go to Edit, then Adjust, and the White Balance menu. Make sure that you select Temperature/Tint in the dropdown box, then click on the little dropper-like icon right beside the dropdown box, and then click on the gray card. It corrects the white balance using the gray card as a reference for neutral gray. Then you can simply copy and paste adjustments and correct the other pictures taken under the same lighting. Simple enough.The Lightdow graycard arrived in a round black polyester bag (about 4 inch in diameter), with a small hoop at the top of the bag for easy attachment to camera bag or backpack by a clip or a caribena. Though the graycard bag material does not convey any feeling of luxury (not that I care anyway), the zipper works very smoothly without any glitch I would typically expect of a poorly constructed bag.The gray card in itself measures about 12 inch by 12 inch when fully extended from its collapsed state in the bag. It is essentially a very soft, velvet like fabric wrapped around some rather flexible plastic scaffold (along the edges of the gray card). So to collapse it back into the bag, you just hold on to the opposite edges of the gray card, twist in opposite directions. Fairly easy, no surprises.Overall, I feel this is a better choice than the credit card sized gray cards, simply because it allows me to take a picture of the gray card without having to stick my lens right onto the smaller gray cards. 5Cheap, durable, accurate, compact. Can't get any better than that. For less than $10, every photographer should have one of these. The edge feels like a thin neoprene or lycra. The internal spring seems very strong and durable. The calibrated surface seems to be waterproof and is easily cleanable. The storage pouch is the perfect size. It's even got a loop on one end, so that you can hang it on something, so you don't need to hold it out in front of the camera. Well worth it.I took a quick set of sample shots in a poorly lit (several cheap CFL lights), messy room, showing Before and After setting custom white balance, using this product. 5Does what it's suppose to do cheaply Does what it suppose to do cheaply. I can set my White Balance within Rawtherapee or Nikon's raw image editor to a certain degree of accuracy, attaining better over all color throughout the default image. (Albeit using the previously mentioned tools, it is somewhat awkward to migrate white balance settings to and fro images. Rawtherapee adheres to pp3 files, while Nikon's raw image editor uses a separate preset menu.)However if you can afford the $80 X-Rite ColorChecker Passport Photo (MSCCPP), then purchase the X-Rite Passport instead as the X-Rite Passport tool has likely far better accurate color patches, multiple toned white patches, and 24+ color patches for color calibration. The X-Rite tool can also create a DCP profile for you camera, and creating DCP (eg. ICC) profiles is really required if using third party raw image editors. If you're satisfied with your camera manufacturer's raw image editor, then ignore the more expensive X-Rite tools and just use this cheaper grey patch for setting at least your white balance, making a surprisingly significant 60-80% difference in overall image color casts.If you're just playing around with TIFF/JPEG images or are on an extremely tight budget, then this cheaper tool will suffice.As for me, I additionally purchased the X-Rite Passport as I typically use Linux third party raw image editors (eg. Rawtherapee) and recently advised there is no default color profile submitted for the Nikon D5600 camera as of yet. I'm also seeing significant color inconsistencies between Rawtherapee and Nikon's raw image editors (eg. ViewNX-i, Capture NX-D, ...), although this grey patch did make significant synchronization results between the raw image editors, I'm still seeing some color anomalies and hoping the X-Rite Passport resolves these remaining anomalies.PROS1) Very affordable.2) Grey side does significantly aide setting a raw image's white balance within Rawtherapee or other raw image editors.3) Adequate if you use and are satisfied with your camera manufacturer's raw editor.CONS1) Not sure how long this Lightdow will last, in comparison to the X-Rite Passport.2) Limited application, only grey and white colored patches.3) The white side has significant threading texture, unlike the X-Rite color patches. 4
See All Reviews
Return And Refund Policy
Return And Refund Policy Return And Refund Policy Return And Refund Policy Return And Refund Policy
Delivery Policy
Delivery Policy Delivery Policy Delivery Policy Delivery Policy Delivery Policy

Recently Viewed

BACK TO TOP