• Kensington Expert Wireless Trackball Mouse (K72359WW)
  • Kensington Expert Wireless Trackball Mouse (K72359WW)
  • Kensington Expert Wireless Trackball Mouse (K72359WW)
  • Kensington Expert Wireless Trackball Mouse (K72359WW)
  • Kensington Expert Wireless Trackball Mouse (K72359WW)
  • Kensington Expert Wireless Trackball Mouse (K72359WW)
Kensington Expert Wireless Trackball Mouse (K72359WW)
Kensington Expert Wireless Trackball Mouse (K72359WW)
Kensington Expert Wireless Trackball Mouse (K72359WW)
Kensington Expert Wireless Trackball Mouse (K72359WW)
Kensington Expert Wireless Trackball Mouse (K72359WW)
Kensington Expert Wireless Trackball Mouse (K72359WW)

Kensington Expert Wireless Trackball Mouse (K72359WW)

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€234,00
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  • Award-winning scroll ring lets you scan up and down pages with ease
  • Detachable, ergonomic wrist rest supports hand and wrist for improved comfort
  • Ambidextrous design
  • Customizable 4-button design via TrackballWorks software
  • Auto-sleep helps conserve battery life
  • Diamond Eye optical tracking for precise cursor control
  • Compatible with Windows (7, 8, 8.1, and 10), macOS (10.8 and later), and Chrome (OS 44 and later)
  • 3 year warranty for the Kensington Expert Wireless Trackball Mouse (K72359WW)
  • 2 year warranty for the Kensington Expert Trackball Mouse (K64325)

Customer Reviews

Rollin, rollin, rollin... First, this review is for the Expert WIRELESS Trackball. In typical Amazon fashion, the wired and wireless reviews are lumped together. I hate that Amazon does this, because it skews the rating system. It's basically the same product, but if there are tons of issues with the wireless feature, it would be good for viewers to know.The reason for my purchase was so that the user, my daughter, would not be tethered to the computer and forced to sit next to it. When I was a teen, I bought a similar Kensington trackball with a generous amount of cord. I would play games on my computer from the comfort of my bed. This is similar to how my daughter now uses it. I point this out, just to show the flexibility of using a trackball. If you had a decent size display, a wireless keyboard and this trackball, you could use your computer just about anywhere.When I first started searching for trackballs, I ended up with a decision between the wired and wireless version of this trackball. A few weeks ago the price difference for the two was over $20, but for some reason the wireless just jumped to within $3. Seeing the mimimal difference in price, I bought the wireless version.Installation was as easy as plugging in the USB dongle (found in the battery compartment). It's actually very thoughtful to have a space for the dongle in the battery compartment, as some people may travel with this trackball and it's a great way to store it. Batteries were included, which isn't too uncommon these days. What was uncommon is that they were Energizers, not the Happy Fun Power 3K batteries that I'm used to recieiving. You know the ones. The batteries with the three week shelf life and 6hr run time. Putting the batteries in the compartment was a little fiddly though. They both go the same way (just an FYI) and have a cheap strip of plastic under the batteries for removal. I've never been a fan of the plastic/cloth battery removal strip, as they tend to break and rip off. After the batteries were installed, it was as simple as turning on the trackball with the off/on switch. There's also the USB/Bluetooth switch, not to be confused as both are labeled. I did not install the software, as currently just using two buttons and the scroll ring is all that is needed.Using the trackball is pure nirvana. Just kidding, but it is nice. The ball is of good weight, great size and just the right amount of drag to it. One thing you won't be using it for is playing Centipede though. The ball is not retained in any way except by Newton's Laws. C'mon, who doesn't want a little physics lesson in the middle of their trackball review? Gravity. I like the fact that the ball can be easily removed for cleaning, rolling around the desk as a stress reliever or as a personal defense weapon. The ball itself is silky smooth and the cursor just glides across the screen. I wish the same could be said for the scroll ring. For all the attention, tech and detail, that was put into the trackball... the scroll ring just seems to have been added as an afterthought. The ring is textured and rubberized, and one caveat I have with rubberized things is that many times the rubber starts to peel and flake off with decent amounts of use. I can't say this will be the case here, but it's just my experience with numerous rubberized surfaces. And now we come to the scrolling. Know how your Microsoft mouse has that little scroll wheel in the middle? Remember how it has little click stops you can feel as you scroll away? You know how it's smooth ams easy rolling? Well... forget about all that with trackball scroll wheel. It's a plastic ring that feels like it's sitting on top of a piece of plastic. No smooth scrolling, no click stops and no use as another button (yeah, I forgot to mention that above). I wouldn't say the scroll wheel grinds as it goes, but it's just a free spinning plastic on plastic wheel. It actually does "hang up" as it spins. You can feel the slight variations and bumps in the plastic as you spin the wheel. Now, for me, this isn't a deal breaker by any means. It functions fine for my needs, but just be aware of this and know that when scrolling with the wheel, it may be a little jumpy at times. The rest of the trackball is constructed well. No complaints or high praise about the placement of buttons or their feel. Everything is good. It would have been nice to have smoother edges on the bottom since this device will be held during use, on occasion, but just a line item for the wish list. I have not used the included pad that attaches to the front of the trackball. I've had similar things for keyboards and just find them bothersome, but it seems pretty durable and well made.The only "issue" I've had is that once when I turned on the computer, it didn't recognize the trackball. I think that was just due to my daughter fooling around with the switches on the bottom though. Speaking of switches, remember that you'll need to turn the trackball on and off everytime you use it. I don't know how long battery life is, but I can't believe that this thing would suck down power like the Starkiller Base, so I'd expect a fairly long time (even if left on at times).The two star dings come from A, the price. I can't yet decide if this is a great value or not for this price, but in the day and age where I can buy a new laptop for $300 (albeit not the best) the $80 price tag seems a bit steep. I think the premium comes from this trackball possibly being the best on the market and now we've hit the law of diminishing returns. And the second star C, the scroll ring. Apparently all the tech and design went into the ball with its cool metallic red surface and not into the scroll ring and battery compartment. At least they didn't name this the Pro Kensington Expert Wireless Trackball Mouse. If it was Pro (like every other fifth item sold today) I'd have expected more ;) 3Decent Mouse with a few oversights in the design process I have purchased the Expert Wireless and Slimblade Trackball mice to compare which one is better in attempts to resolve possible RSI issues. Here is my opinion on how they stack up.Expert Mouse Pluses:+Fits great in hand+Buttons have a slight edge, which makes it easier to click than the slimblade+The scroll wheel works SIGNIFICANTLY better than the SlimBlade's twist to scroll option, especially when confined to a smaller window where the mouse jetting across the screen will cause you to randomly quit scrolling where you desire+The palm rest really helps, and is quite necessary for this mouse because of the angle+Wireless and Bluetooth optionsExpert Mouse Negatives:-Angle that your hand sits at actually causes more stress, and is the reason I will probably be returning this device-Scroll wheel has a very cheap design. While I like it better than the SlimBlade scrolling, it makes a strange noise any time you scroll more than a couple of clicks and makes me feel as though the product will break sooner due to cheap plastic parts. Also the wheel doesn't have any stop points/clicks, but this doesn't both me too much-Under the ball the mouse has no hole at the bottom, and the area isn't smooth, so it makes cleaning the area under the ball more difficultSlimblade Mouse Pluses:+Easy to clean - under the trackball everything is smooth and there is a hole at the bottom. This allows for skin cells to fall out of the mouse and with some occasional cleaning, you can keep the skin cells out of this mouse much easier+The angle is much nicer than the Expert mouse, leaving your hand feeling much more comfortable after a solid day of use+The design just looks nicer than the Expert mouse when they sit side by sideSlimblade Mouse Negatives:-The keys are very flat and have no edges like the expert mouse, which actually makes clicking ever so slightly less comfortable-The mouse doesn't quite fit in your hand as nicely because it is not at a raised angle, but this is also a positive because it doesn't leave your hand feeling as fatigued at the end of a day-The scrolling functionality leaves a lot to be desired. While it doesn't feel as cheap as the Expert mouse, it causes a lot of issues while scrolling within small areas because your pointer will move and lose focus if you do a decent amount of scrolling at once down a large list. This has caused some loss of productivity and was the main reason I purchased the Expert mouse in hopes that the experience would be better. While I'd like to see the ability to scroll by turning the ball, I think it either needs to be refined to disable pointer motion altogether when activated, or they should bring back the rotatable wheel and put it on ball barrings so it can not only scroll freely and you could just stop it, but also to give it a smooth feel, instead of a cheap one. People would pay extra knowing the quality is worth it.-Only option is wired. Not only does this leave unsightly cables on my desk, it also makes it more difficult to switch between my right and left hand throughout the day.-Should have came with a wrist wrest like the Expert doesAll and all the only reason I choose the Slimblade over the Expert is because the expert is at a funny angle which causes more issues than just using a traditional mouse. Otherwise I'd totally select the Expert over the Slimblade. 4If the housing was flat, it would be 5 stars. Love the feel of the trackball. Wish the angle was flatter. It kinks my wrist and causes pain that a trackball was supposed to eliminate. Ended up having to angle the housing flat, and then creating a pad for my forearm.After several months of use, my updated review:I bought this trackball hoping it would work out. But sadly, it has not. The ball is large, easy to move, love have 4 buttons and scroll wheel. Those features I have zero problems with. I even like the software, easy to use and allows programming of the buttons. My biggest complaint is with the angle they made. A trackball is supposed to be an ergonomic tool and allow the hand and wrist to remain in a natural neutral position. This is anything but that. Even using the supplied "wrist pad" the angle is in the completely wrong direction for the tool. I have had to resort to stuffing bubble wrap under the housing to get then angle up and then placing a bubble wrap forearm pad the level my arm . I have been using this in this configuration for months and am finally just getting tired of this. I spent good money hoping this would help my hand after using a mouse for 30 years running CAD systems. If Kensington just made the angle go in the opposite direction, this would be the best out there. Whoever was the lead design engineer on this product should be fired for angling this in the completely wrong direction. 1Dont' Waist Your Time and Money on This Mouse. ok, so looking at this mouse you would think its got a great build quality. When I received it the first thing I noticed when using the ball was that it made so much noise. It is not smooth feeling at all and the noise it makes will drive you crazy. Then I realized the ball just pops out. It does not seem to fit properly in its plastic housing so it feels loose and cheap. The ring around the ball does not feel good either. It feels loose and like it will come apart eventually. Since I was unsatisfied with how the whole mouse felt I ended up returning it. Definitely not worth the money they want for this. I am saving you time and money letting you know this as I don't normally leave a review on items I purchase. Look for something better. 1Nice Trackball Despite Quirks I purchased the Kensington Expert Wireless Trackball Mouse to replace a Logitech wireless trackball which developed the notorious Logitech double-click problem (one left click produces a double-click, a hardware failure common to their trackball product). I have always been a fan of Kensington trackballs and was very excited to finally see a wireless expert-sized version on the market. This one does its job but set-up was tricky, the BT connection is glitchy, and there are a few of what I consider 'design flaws':PROS:1) Wireless ability makes this a great pointing device for a living room HTPC type setup where there is no desk for a traditional mouse.2) Advanced customization features, such as slow, and linear options (press and hold a key while scrolling) facilitate precision movement. The extra buttons can be programmed with custom functions in the device configuration software.3) Smooth roller (after device is broken-in) movement4) Ability to use the same pointing device with two computers: pair one via Bluetooth and use the USB dongle on the other. The BT on/off switch underneath the device allows you to switch between computers ("BT-on" uses only the BT connected device, "BT-off" uses the USB dongle).5) Battery life is excellent. I'm still on my first battery after using it on a daily basis for several weeks.CONS:1) USB dongle (storage location is inside the battery compartment) was not recognized upon plug-in. Product did not arrive with a CD. I went to the Kensington website and found the product support page to download the drivers and software. After downloading and running the installer the USB dongle has been working fine. Also the dongle has no distinctive markings, so if you use more than one small USB plug-in, you need to remember that the plain blank one is the Kensington dongle.2) BT pairing is easy but maintaining the connection is intermittent. Every ~10-30 minutes the bluetooth connection resets, which is an annoying first world problem. It disconnects, causing the trackball to stop working, and then within 5 seconds re-connects and works fine again, like a hiccup. Other reviewers have reported this issue and have not resolved it so I am assuming it is a BT driver issue and hope that an updated driver will fix it in the future if Kensington puts the effort into bug fixing.3) Scroll ring feel is pretty bad. The scrolling ring is notchy and feels very cheaply made for an expensive trackball. The scrolling action is jumpy no matter how you configure it in the settings.4) Having the ability to use the same trackball on two computers is nice, but it is awkward to get to the switch. Underneath the device there are two similar looking small switches, one turns the trackball on and off, and the other controls bluetooth on and off. Toggling the bluetooth switch is what makes the trackball switch between the BT connected computer and the USB dongle connected computer. This means picking up the unit and turning it upside down to locate and flip the tiny switch. Clumsy people (like me) may also find that the ball will fall out if it is not held the right way while doing this.Suggested Improvements for Kensington ("Dear Kensington,"):1) Change the scroll-ring design, perhaps keeping the scroll ring as a volume control and adding another thumb-wheel towards the front of the unit (in front of the ball) for scrolling (like where the Logitech wireless trackball puts the scroll wheel).2) Fix the bluetooth connectivity issue where the device disconnects and reconnects intermittently. It seems that, for whatever reason, the battery-saver activates despite the device being in use while in bluetooth mode. It does not do this cycle while connected via USB dongle.3) Stop driving your customers crazy with off-shore scripted tech support agents who ultimately cannot fix the error described above (#2). They will waste time while messing up a lot of settings in their futile effort to help. Just declare it a known issue and then fix it. Please.4) Move the BT on/off switch to a side, front or back of the unit so the user doesn't need to turn it upside-down to find the switch, risking a drop of the track-ball from its cradle. Extra functionality suggestion: allow more than one BT connection to be stored for pairing with 2+ computers. Slider switch for USB-BT1-BT2-BT3, etc.5) Allow the front-to-back angle (rake) of the device to be adjustable. Adding a "kickstand" or snap-on wedge to the bottom rear of the trackball would allow for more ergonomic variability of the tilt, which affects wrist extension.6) Packaging & Instructions: "out of the box" frustration for customers can be reduced by: providing instructions on how to locate and download updated drivers, revealing the secret location of the USB dongle (hidden inside the battery compartment), and notification that it is normal for trackball motion to be coarse for the first few hours of use during the break-in period.Overall it is a nice trackball even though it feels like a 1.0 design. I am looking forward to Kensington's next iteration of the wireless expert trackball. 3This rollerball mouse is HUGE and yet it works pretty well. It's symmetric so that it works equally ... This rollerball mouse is HUGE and yet it works pretty well. It's symmetric so that it works equally well right-handed or left, but the symmetry also works against using it without remapping the buttons. The default button assignments are for the lower-left button to be the normal left-click button and the lower right to be the normal right click. As a right-hander, my hand rests on it so that the thumb is centered on the lower-left button. I can then use my index finger to move the ball (also huge) and operate the scroll ring between my thumb and middle finger. However, the lower right button is then under my finger/palm joints. To use it, I have to move my hand out of position. It's more natural to re-assign the upper-right button as the right-click button operated with my middle finger. I've reassigned the upper-left and lower-right buttons for other functions that are not used so often.All of the buttons can be reassigned using downloaded software. You can get this at the Kensington Web site, but I was already using XMouse Button Control and it worked fine with this mouse as well.The large ball is not retained and comes right out if you turn the mouse upside down. Since the device is heavy (13.2 oz without the palm rest, 15.7 with it) and has rubber pads on the bottom to keep it from sliding around, this might not be a problem unless one were using it in some more vertical position than normal. However, you must be careful when you turn it over to change batteries, to apply or remove the wrist rest, to get the dongle out, to switch modes (Bluetooth vs 2.4 Ghz) or to power off the unit. If not, you'll be chasing the ball around the room.With the wrist pad installed this device is 8 3/4 inches long (see photos). The wrist pad is well engineered and has a textured leather-like surface.In my application, the mouse operates a old Windows XP computer using the 2.4 Ghz dongle provided. I have not tried a bluetooth connection. While XP is not listed as compatible on the box or in the user's guide, it has worked fine. 4With this many wireless reviews, who's gonna care about mine? You buy a trackball - it's like buying a mouse, right? Plug and play. Even wireless.Oh, don't be so droll. Kensington has finally micro-managed itself into the pit of ineptitude from which I fear there is no escape. They may be on their final downhill slide.I own Kensington products. I've purchased trackballs from them since the 1980s. Yes. Perhaps since they started making them. All with a cord. All very happy. And why not? They did everything right.But I was feeling sporty and modern. I generally don't like wireless devices as they occasionally exhibit a finicky side I don't enjoy in computer work. But this setup may have benefited from a wireless device. I was so stupid.Plug it in. Yes it works slowly. Kensington USED TO include the drivers. Nope. Not anymore. Those days are gone. No matter, I have other trackballs - i'll use THAT copy of drivers. Nope. Can't recognize it. Go get the LATEST driver, you stupid customer. Okay, I'll do that soon.Then i notice the wireless is inferior. Yes, it's without a wire, but no, the reception makes it unusable. It's only line of sight. It may as well be an old infrared unit. Line of sight works great. Behind anything at all (including flowers), it skips, stutters, and pauses. Worthless. Far below what I once thought was Kensington quality.New batteries? Nope. No change. Still a mess. Okay, let's do the driver thing. Downloaded -- a bit of an unfriendly chore by itself -- and install. But wouldn't you know it?? "This version of Windows requires a digitally signed driver." (W7) Can't use it. It's their driver, off their site, d/l this very day, but they're apparently not trustworthy enough for windows to work. Now, of course, the device doesn't work at all -- after 2 more reboots and tweaks - what with Windows having isolated the driver and even warning me about it.It's going back. The reception is rubbish. The software is insane -- and that's good ol' W7 and it STILL won't work.Kensington has jumped the shark. They no longer make products for people to use, but simply bait for fish to bite on.It SHOULD have been 1. plug and play. 2. exceptional reception. 3. no-glitch software. 4. a happy-to-give-you-the-drivers-we-require website.If you're looking for any of this, do not buy the wireless version. Do not buy from Kensington.Love my other Kensington trackballs. 1They finally went wireless and need to work out the kinks. When I saw that Kensington had finally come out with the Expert Wireless Trackball, man was I excited! I just wondered what had taken them so long. I hate having cords on my desk and now with the wireless trackball it's one less cord on my desk and now I don't have to worry about where I have to place my trackball.The reason it doesn't have 5 stars is that I've had some connectivity issues with it over the past 2 months. The first time it happened it was 2 weeks after I got the trackball, when I went out of the room for 5 minutes after just using the computer and when I returned it didn't work at all. None of the buttons worked, it wouldn't move the pointer, and even open up the Trackball Works software to see if there was anything that could be done, but I didn't find anything that resolved my issue. The only way to get it working again was to remove the batteries and unplug the USB dongle. After re-installing the batteries and dongle everything worked as it should. This has happened two more time since and realizing what happened the 2nd time I tried everything I could think of to get it working before I pulled the batteries and dongle.Like others have stated, I couldn't get it to connect via the Bluetooth mode for whatever reason. One other minor issue is that one of the rubber feet has fallen off already and I kind of figured it would happen over time, but not after 6 weeks. The same thing happened to all my other wired expert trackballs and I just end up super gluing them back on, but it's kind of annoying that they fall off in the first place.Edit: Well after 5 months of ownership it's time to return the wireless trackball. The trackball will only stay connected for a day at the most and being that I'm a C4 quadriplegic, I don't have the ability to remove the dongle and batteries from the trackball. Heck, I even went to the length of uninstalling the trackball and the Trackball Works software from my computer and re-installing everything. That also only worked for a day. I tried changing the batteries and tried using the Bluetooth option, which worked for all of 2 minutes. Luckily I still had my wired trackball to use, otherwise I can't use my computer.Wish me luck with getting it warrantied. 2Simply the best! As far as I'm concerned, this is the ultimate pointing device/mouse/trackball, etc. I've progressed from a basic mouse through ergonomic mice, through various trackballs, but the underlying problem always seemed to be tension created in my hand and wrist because of the tendency to tense the muscles do to the layout of the various devices. They all seemed to be designed such that you naturally grip them. I finally decided to try the Kensington Expert Wireless Trackball Mouse about 6 months ago now and I have tremendously less pain and strain in my hand and wrist. It is not the kind of device you grip, but rather your hand basically rests on it and move your hand much more freely. The included, optional wrist rest has also worked out great. This trackball is especially good for larger hands, as it allows your fingers to remain relaxed and stretched out, instead of curling them up trying to remain on buttons that are too close together. It may appear to be large, and I guess it is, but it allows the hand more freedom than any other pointing device I've used so far. The large size of the ball itself allows for moving the cursor over a large portion of the screen with just a simple flick when needed. 5Molasses in January Full disclosure: I have Fibromyalgia which effects the movement of my hands. I spent more than 40 years working in IT. I am an old female online gamer (not many of us around). I used to play Star Trek on the mainframe back in the '70s. I use my computer all day long, from espresso to bedtime.Let's start with the competition.Logitech M570 Wireless Trackball - Now I will admit I have never used this device but I have used it's grandfather. This is a thumb trackball. I used to have one at the office and one at home. I loved it and used it for seven years until my thumb stopped working. I stopped using it over 15 years ago. Recently I started getting thumb pain for no apparent reason. Then I realized that even though I had quit using it I still had trackball thumb and was getting arthritis in it. It is kind of like quitting smoking and then 20 years later getting lung cancer. Use at your own risk.Logitech Trackman Marble Mouse - This is what I currently have and am trying to get away from. This is a finger ball like the Kensington Expert. We will start with the good. It has a smaller ball which I prefer. Due to the ball and the software your pointer will fly across your screen at the speed of light which I like. I have found the buttons are put in a convenient location. They take very little hand effort to press which I like and need. The bad is the universal scroll which is not so universal. For me it works in my Firefox browser and it will work with Microsoft programs and that's about it. If you want to zoom in or zoom out (which is quite common) in another program you are out of luck. So if you play MMORPG's like WOW, Rift, EVE, SW, GW2, TSW you are out of luck. If you play single player games like CIV 6, HOMM7, MOO, Endless Space, Gal Civ III, Stellaris, you are out of luck. I had to write my own code and assign it to keyboard keys so I could zoom and I don't have a programmable keyboard. It sounds like Logitech needs to hire better help. My dogs are pretty good coders and they only charge $50 an hour. This device may be usable if you only do office work.Now let's get to why we are here, the Kensington Expert Wireless Trackball.I know there have been complaints about the scroll ring but I don't know why. I love it. It is a thing of beauty. It is located in just the right place and requires just the right amount of pressure to operate. People who don't like it need to get out more. I find the ball really big making it a bit awkward for me. It takes some getting used to. It is also quite heavy. Even with the software set to the fastest speed it takes some hand effort to get the pointer across the screen. It's like watching molasses in January. This is something I don't need. After a couple of hours I end up with hand pain. I need a trackball I can use all day. I find the upper buttons awkward to use. Reaching across that big ball every time I want to do a double-click is a bit awkward. I haven't been able to double-click in 25 years. I have to have a button do it for me, so yeah, this is awkward. Having four buttons beneath the ball I think would be a better design. The good news is you don't have to be a programmer to use this device.SummaryLogitech M570 Wireless Trackball - use if you are a masochistLogitech Trackman Marble Mouse - use if you are only going to do office work or you are a programmerKensington Expert Wireless Trackball - use if you have healthy hands and are not a programmer 3
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Customer Reviews

Rollin, rollin, rollin... First, this review is for the Expert WIRELESS Trackball. In typical Amazon fashion, the wired and wireless reviews are lumped together. I hate that Amazon does this, because it skews the rating system. It's basically the same product, but if there are tons of issues with the wireless feature, it would be good for viewers to know.The reason for my purchase was so that the user, my daughter, would not be tethered to the computer and forced to sit next to it. When I was a teen, I bought a similar Kensington trackball with a generous amount of cord. I would play games on my computer from the comfort of my bed. This is similar to how my daughter now uses it. I point this out, just to show the flexibility of using a trackball. If you had a decent size display, a wireless keyboard and this trackball, you could use your computer just about anywhere.When I first started searching for trackballs, I ended up with a decision between the wired and wireless version of this trackball. A few weeks ago the price difference for the two was over $20, but for some reason the wireless just jumped to within $3. Seeing the mimimal difference in price, I bought the wireless version.Installation was as easy as plugging in the USB dongle (found in the battery compartment). It's actually very thoughtful to have a space for the dongle in the battery compartment, as some people may travel with this trackball and it's a great way to store it. Batteries were included, which isn't too uncommon these days. What was uncommon is that they were Energizers, not the Happy Fun Power 3K batteries that I'm used to recieiving. You know the ones. The batteries with the three week shelf life and 6hr run time. Putting the batteries in the compartment was a little fiddly though. They both go the same way (just an FYI) and have a cheap strip of plastic under the batteries for removal. I've never been a fan of the plastic/cloth battery removal strip, as they tend to break and rip off. After the batteries were installed, it was as simple as turning on the trackball with the off/on switch. There's also the USB/Bluetooth switch, not to be confused as both are labeled. I did not install the software, as currently just using two buttons and the scroll ring is all that is needed.Using the trackball is pure nirvana. Just kidding, but it is nice. The ball is of good weight, great size and just the right amount of drag to it. One thing you won't be using it for is playing Centipede though. The ball is not retained in any way except by Newton's Laws. C'mon, who doesn't want a little physics lesson in the middle of their trackball review? Gravity. I like the fact that the ball can be easily removed for cleaning, rolling around the desk as a stress reliever or as a personal defense weapon. The ball itself is silky smooth and the cursor just glides across the screen. I wish the same could be said for the scroll ring. For all the attention, tech and detail, that was put into the trackball... the scroll ring just seems to have been added as an afterthought. The ring is textured and rubberized, and one caveat I have with rubberized things is that many times the rubber starts to peel and flake off with decent amounts of use. I can't say this will be the case here, but it's just my experience with numerous rubberized surfaces. And now we come to the scrolling. Know how your Microsoft mouse has that little scroll wheel in the middle? Remember how it has little click stops you can feel as you scroll away? You know how it's smooth ams easy rolling? Well... forget about all that with trackball scroll wheel. It's a plastic ring that feels like it's sitting on top of a piece of plastic. No smooth scrolling, no click stops and no use as another button (yeah, I forgot to mention that above). I wouldn't say the scroll wheel grinds as it goes, but it's just a free spinning plastic on plastic wheel. It actually does "hang up" as it spins. You can feel the slight variations and bumps in the plastic as you spin the wheel. Now, for me, this isn't a deal breaker by any means. It functions fine for my needs, but just be aware of this and know that when scrolling with the wheel, it may be a little jumpy at times. The rest of the trackball is constructed well. No complaints or high praise about the placement of buttons or their feel. Everything is good. It would have been nice to have smoother edges on the bottom since this device will be held during use, on occasion, but just a line item for the wish list. I have not used the included pad that attaches to the front of the trackball. I've had similar things for keyboards and just find them bothersome, but it seems pretty durable and well made.The only "issue" I've had is that once when I turned on the computer, it didn't recognize the trackball. I think that was just due to my daughter fooling around with the switches on the bottom though. Speaking of switches, remember that you'll need to turn the trackball on and off everytime you use it. I don't know how long battery life is, but I can't believe that this thing would suck down power like the Starkiller Base, so I'd expect a fairly long time (even if left on at times).The two star dings come from A, the price. I can't yet decide if this is a great value or not for this price, but in the day and age where I can buy a new laptop for $300 (albeit not the best) the $80 price tag seems a bit steep. I think the premium comes from this trackball possibly being the best on the market and now we've hit the law of diminishing returns. And the second star C, the scroll ring. Apparently all the tech and design went into the ball with its cool metallic red surface and not into the scroll ring and battery compartment. At least they didn't name this the Pro Kensington Expert Wireless Trackball Mouse. If it was Pro (like every other fifth item sold today) I'd have expected more ;) 3Decent Mouse with a few oversights in the design process I have purchased the Expert Wireless and Slimblade Trackball mice to compare which one is better in attempts to resolve possible RSI issues. Here is my opinion on how they stack up.Expert Mouse Pluses:+Fits great in hand+Buttons have a slight edge, which makes it easier to click than the slimblade+The scroll wheel works SIGNIFICANTLY better than the SlimBlade's twist to scroll option, especially when confined to a smaller window where the mouse jetting across the screen will cause you to randomly quit scrolling where you desire+The palm rest really helps, and is quite necessary for this mouse because of the angle+Wireless and Bluetooth optionsExpert Mouse Negatives:-Angle that your hand sits at actually causes more stress, and is the reason I will probably be returning this device-Scroll wheel has a very cheap design. While I like it better than the SlimBlade scrolling, it makes a strange noise any time you scroll more than a couple of clicks and makes me feel as though the product will break sooner due to cheap plastic parts. Also the wheel doesn't have any stop points/clicks, but this doesn't both me too much-Under the ball the mouse has no hole at the bottom, and the area isn't smooth, so it makes cleaning the area under the ball more difficultSlimblade Mouse Pluses:+Easy to clean - under the trackball everything is smooth and there is a hole at the bottom. This allows for skin cells to fall out of the mouse and with some occasional cleaning, you can keep the skin cells out of this mouse much easier+The angle is much nicer than the Expert mouse, leaving your hand feeling much more comfortable after a solid day of use+The design just looks nicer than the Expert mouse when they sit side by sideSlimblade Mouse Negatives:-The keys are very flat and have no edges like the expert mouse, which actually makes clicking ever so slightly less comfortable-The mouse doesn't quite fit in your hand as nicely because it is not at a raised angle, but this is also a positive because it doesn't leave your hand feeling as fatigued at the end of a day-The scrolling functionality leaves a lot to be desired. While it doesn't feel as cheap as the Expert mouse, it causes a lot of issues while scrolling within small areas because your pointer will move and lose focus if you do a decent amount of scrolling at once down a large list. This has caused some loss of productivity and was the main reason I purchased the Expert mouse in hopes that the experience would be better. While I'd like to see the ability to scroll by turning the ball, I think it either needs to be refined to disable pointer motion altogether when activated, or they should bring back the rotatable wheel and put it on ball barrings so it can not only scroll freely and you could just stop it, but also to give it a smooth feel, instead of a cheap one. People would pay extra knowing the quality is worth it.-Only option is wired. Not only does this leave unsightly cables on my desk, it also makes it more difficult to switch between my right and left hand throughout the day.-Should have came with a wrist wrest like the Expert doesAll and all the only reason I choose the Slimblade over the Expert is because the expert is at a funny angle which causes more issues than just using a traditional mouse. Otherwise I'd totally select the Expert over the Slimblade. 4If the housing was flat, it would be 5 stars. Love the feel of the trackball. Wish the angle was flatter. It kinks my wrist and causes pain that a trackball was supposed to eliminate. Ended up having to angle the housing flat, and then creating a pad for my forearm.After several months of use, my updated review:I bought this trackball hoping it would work out. But sadly, it has not. The ball is large, easy to move, love have 4 buttons and scroll wheel. Those features I have zero problems with. I even like the software, easy to use and allows programming of the buttons. My biggest complaint is with the angle they made. A trackball is supposed to be an ergonomic tool and allow the hand and wrist to remain in a natural neutral position. This is anything but that. Even using the supplied "wrist pad" the angle is in the completely wrong direction for the tool. I have had to resort to stuffing bubble wrap under the housing to get then angle up and then placing a bubble wrap forearm pad the level my arm . I have been using this in this configuration for months and am finally just getting tired of this. I spent good money hoping this would help my hand after using a mouse for 30 years running CAD systems. If Kensington just made the angle go in the opposite direction, this would be the best out there. Whoever was the lead design engineer on this product should be fired for angling this in the completely wrong direction. 1Dont' Waist Your Time and Money on This Mouse. ok, so looking at this mouse you would think its got a great build quality. When I received it the first thing I noticed when using the ball was that it made so much noise. It is not smooth feeling at all and the noise it makes will drive you crazy. Then I realized the ball just pops out. It does not seem to fit properly in its plastic housing so it feels loose and cheap. The ring around the ball does not feel good either. It feels loose and like it will come apart eventually. Since I was unsatisfied with how the whole mouse felt I ended up returning it. Definitely not worth the money they want for this. I am saving you time and money letting you know this as I don't normally leave a review on items I purchase. Look for something better. 1Nice Trackball Despite Quirks I purchased the Kensington Expert Wireless Trackball Mouse to replace a Logitech wireless trackball which developed the notorious Logitech double-click problem (one left click produces a double-click, a hardware failure common to their trackball product). I have always been a fan of Kensington trackballs and was very excited to finally see a wireless expert-sized version on the market. This one does its job but set-up was tricky, the BT connection is glitchy, and there are a few of what I consider 'design flaws':PROS:1) Wireless ability makes this a great pointing device for a living room HTPC type setup where there is no desk for a traditional mouse.2) Advanced customization features, such as slow, and linear options (press and hold a key while scrolling) facilitate precision movement. The extra buttons can be programmed with custom functions in the device configuration software.3) Smooth roller (after device is broken-in) movement4) Ability to use the same pointing device with two computers: pair one via Bluetooth and use the USB dongle on the other. The BT on/off switch underneath the device allows you to switch between computers ("BT-on" uses only the BT connected device, "BT-off" uses the USB dongle).5) Battery life is excellent. I'm still on my first battery after using it on a daily basis for several weeks.CONS:1) USB dongle (storage location is inside the battery compartment) was not recognized upon plug-in. Product did not arrive with a CD. I went to the Kensington website and found the product support page to download the drivers and software. After downloading and running the installer the USB dongle has been working fine. Also the dongle has no distinctive markings, so if you use more than one small USB plug-in, you need to remember that the plain blank one is the Kensington dongle.2) BT pairing is easy but maintaining the connection is intermittent. Every ~10-30 minutes the bluetooth connection resets, which is an annoying first world problem. It disconnects, causing the trackball to stop working, and then within 5 seconds re-connects and works fine again, like a hiccup. Other reviewers have reported this issue and have not resolved it so I am assuming it is a BT driver issue and hope that an updated driver will fix it in the future if Kensington puts the effort into bug fixing.3) Scroll ring feel is pretty bad. The scrolling ring is notchy and feels very cheaply made for an expensive trackball. The scrolling action is jumpy no matter how you configure it in the settings.4) Having the ability to use the same trackball on two computers is nice, but it is awkward to get to the switch. Underneath the device there are two similar looking small switches, one turns the trackball on and off, and the other controls bluetooth on and off. Toggling the bluetooth switch is what makes the trackball switch between the BT connected computer and the USB dongle connected computer. This means picking up the unit and turning it upside down to locate and flip the tiny switch. Clumsy people (like me) may also find that the ball will fall out if it is not held the right way while doing this.Suggested Improvements for Kensington ("Dear Kensington,"):1) Change the scroll-ring design, perhaps keeping the scroll ring as a volume control and adding another thumb-wheel towards the front of the unit (in front of the ball) for scrolling (like where the Logitech wireless trackball puts the scroll wheel).2) Fix the bluetooth connectivity issue where the device disconnects and reconnects intermittently. It seems that, for whatever reason, the battery-saver activates despite the device being in use while in bluetooth mode. It does not do this cycle while connected via USB dongle.3) Stop driving your customers crazy with off-shore scripted tech support agents who ultimately cannot fix the error described above (#2). They will waste time while messing up a lot of settings in their futile effort to help. Just declare it a known issue and then fix it. Please.4) Move the BT on/off switch to a side, front or back of the unit so the user doesn't need to turn it upside-down to find the switch, risking a drop of the track-ball from its cradle. Extra functionality suggestion: allow more than one BT connection to be stored for pairing with 2+ computers. Slider switch for USB-BT1-BT2-BT3, etc.5) Allow the front-to-back angle (rake) of the device to be adjustable. Adding a "kickstand" or snap-on wedge to the bottom rear of the trackball would allow for more ergonomic variability of the tilt, which affects wrist extension.6) Packaging & Instructions: "out of the box" frustration for customers can be reduced by: providing instructions on how to locate and download updated drivers, revealing the secret location of the USB dongle (hidden inside the battery compartment), and notification that it is normal for trackball motion to be coarse for the first few hours of use during the break-in period.Overall it is a nice trackball even though it feels like a 1.0 design. I am looking forward to Kensington's next iteration of the wireless expert trackball. 3This rollerball mouse is HUGE and yet it works pretty well. It's symmetric so that it works equally ... This rollerball mouse is HUGE and yet it works pretty well. It's symmetric so that it works equally well right-handed or left, but the symmetry also works against using it without remapping the buttons. The default button assignments are for the lower-left button to be the normal left-click button and the lower right to be the normal right click. As a right-hander, my hand rests on it so that the thumb is centered on the lower-left button. I can then use my index finger to move the ball (also huge) and operate the scroll ring between my thumb and middle finger. However, the lower right button is then under my finger/palm joints. To use it, I have to move my hand out of position. It's more natural to re-assign the upper-right button as the right-click button operated with my middle finger. I've reassigned the upper-left and lower-right buttons for other functions that are not used so often.All of the buttons can be reassigned using downloaded software. You can get this at the Kensington Web site, but I was already using XMouse Button Control and it worked fine with this mouse as well.The large ball is not retained and comes right out if you turn the mouse upside down. Since the device is heavy (13.2 oz without the palm rest, 15.7 with it) and has rubber pads on the bottom to keep it from sliding around, this might not be a problem unless one were using it in some more vertical position than normal. However, you must be careful when you turn it over to change batteries, to apply or remove the wrist rest, to get the dongle out, to switch modes (Bluetooth vs 2.4 Ghz) or to power off the unit. If not, you'll be chasing the ball around the room.With the wrist pad installed this device is 8 3/4 inches long (see photos). The wrist pad is well engineered and has a textured leather-like surface.In my application, the mouse operates a old Windows XP computer using the 2.4 Ghz dongle provided. I have not tried a bluetooth connection. While XP is not listed as compatible on the box or in the user's guide, it has worked fine. 4With this many wireless reviews, who's gonna care about mine? You buy a trackball - it's like buying a mouse, right? Plug and play. Even wireless.Oh, don't be so droll. Kensington has finally micro-managed itself into the pit of ineptitude from which I fear there is no escape. They may be on their final downhill slide.I own Kensington products. I've purchased trackballs from them since the 1980s. Yes. Perhaps since they started making them. All with a cord. All very happy. And why not? They did everything right.But I was feeling sporty and modern. I generally don't like wireless devices as they occasionally exhibit a finicky side I don't enjoy in computer work. But this setup may have benefited from a wireless device. I was so stupid.Plug it in. Yes it works slowly. Kensington USED TO include the drivers. Nope. Not anymore. Those days are gone. No matter, I have other trackballs - i'll use THAT copy of drivers. Nope. Can't recognize it. Go get the LATEST driver, you stupid customer. Okay, I'll do that soon.Then i notice the wireless is inferior. Yes, it's without a wire, but no, the reception makes it unusable. It's only line of sight. It may as well be an old infrared unit. Line of sight works great. Behind anything at all (including flowers), it skips, stutters, and pauses. Worthless. Far below what I once thought was Kensington quality.New batteries? Nope. No change. Still a mess. Okay, let's do the driver thing. Downloaded -- a bit of an unfriendly chore by itself -- and install. But wouldn't you know it?? "This version of Windows requires a digitally signed driver." (W7) Can't use it. It's their driver, off their site, d/l this very day, but they're apparently not trustworthy enough for windows to work. Now, of course, the device doesn't work at all -- after 2 more reboots and tweaks - what with Windows having isolated the driver and even warning me about it.It's going back. The reception is rubbish. The software is insane -- and that's good ol' W7 and it STILL won't work.Kensington has jumped the shark. They no longer make products for people to use, but simply bait for fish to bite on.It SHOULD have been 1. plug and play. 2. exceptional reception. 3. no-glitch software. 4. a happy-to-give-you-the-drivers-we-require website.If you're looking for any of this, do not buy the wireless version. Do not buy from Kensington.Love my other Kensington trackballs. 1They finally went wireless and need to work out the kinks. When I saw that Kensington had finally come out with the Expert Wireless Trackball, man was I excited! I just wondered what had taken them so long. I hate having cords on my desk and now with the wireless trackball it's one less cord on my desk and now I don't have to worry about where I have to place my trackball.The reason it doesn't have 5 stars is that I've had some connectivity issues with it over the past 2 months. The first time it happened it was 2 weeks after I got the trackball, when I went out of the room for 5 minutes after just using the computer and when I returned it didn't work at all. None of the buttons worked, it wouldn't move the pointer, and even open up the Trackball Works software to see if there was anything that could be done, but I didn't find anything that resolved my issue. The only way to get it working again was to remove the batteries and unplug the USB dongle. After re-installing the batteries and dongle everything worked as it should. This has happened two more time since and realizing what happened the 2nd time I tried everything I could think of to get it working before I pulled the batteries and dongle.Like others have stated, I couldn't get it to connect via the Bluetooth mode for whatever reason. One other minor issue is that one of the rubber feet has fallen off already and I kind of figured it would happen over time, but not after 6 weeks. The same thing happened to all my other wired expert trackballs and I just end up super gluing them back on, but it's kind of annoying that they fall off in the first place.Edit: Well after 5 months of ownership it's time to return the wireless trackball. The trackball will only stay connected for a day at the most and being that I'm a C4 quadriplegic, I don't have the ability to remove the dongle and batteries from the trackball. Heck, I even went to the length of uninstalling the trackball and the Trackball Works software from my computer and re-installing everything. That also only worked for a day. I tried changing the batteries and tried using the Bluetooth option, which worked for all of 2 minutes. Luckily I still had my wired trackball to use, otherwise I can't use my computer.Wish me luck with getting it warrantied. 2Simply the best! As far as I'm concerned, this is the ultimate pointing device/mouse/trackball, etc. I've progressed from a basic mouse through ergonomic mice, through various trackballs, but the underlying problem always seemed to be tension created in my hand and wrist because of the tendency to tense the muscles do to the layout of the various devices. They all seemed to be designed such that you naturally grip them. I finally decided to try the Kensington Expert Wireless Trackball Mouse about 6 months ago now and I have tremendously less pain and strain in my hand and wrist. It is not the kind of device you grip, but rather your hand basically rests on it and move your hand much more freely. The included, optional wrist rest has also worked out great. This trackball is especially good for larger hands, as it allows your fingers to remain relaxed and stretched out, instead of curling them up trying to remain on buttons that are too close together. It may appear to be large, and I guess it is, but it allows the hand more freedom than any other pointing device I've used so far. The large size of the ball itself allows for moving the cursor over a large portion of the screen with just a simple flick when needed. 5Molasses in January Full disclosure: I have Fibromyalgia which effects the movement of my hands. I spent more than 40 years working in IT. I am an old female online gamer (not many of us around). I used to play Star Trek on the mainframe back in the '70s. I use my computer all day long, from espresso to bedtime.Let's start with the competition.Logitech M570 Wireless Trackball - Now I will admit I have never used this device but I have used it's grandfather. This is a thumb trackball. I used to have one at the office and one at home. I loved it and used it for seven years until my thumb stopped working. I stopped using it over 15 years ago. Recently I started getting thumb pain for no apparent reason. Then I realized that even though I had quit using it I still had trackball thumb and was getting arthritis in it. It is kind of like quitting smoking and then 20 years later getting lung cancer. Use at your own risk.Logitech Trackman Marble Mouse - This is what I currently have and am trying to get away from. This is a finger ball like the Kensington Expert. We will start with the good. It has a smaller ball which I prefer. Due to the ball and the software your pointer will fly across your screen at the speed of light which I like. I have found the buttons are put in a convenient location. They take very little hand effort to press which I like and need. The bad is the universal scroll which is not so universal. For me it works in my Firefox browser and it will work with Microsoft programs and that's about it. If you want to zoom in or zoom out (which is quite common) in another program you are out of luck. So if you play MMORPG's like WOW, Rift, EVE, SW, GW2, TSW you are out of luck. If you play single player games like CIV 6, HOMM7, MOO, Endless Space, Gal Civ III, Stellaris, you are out of luck. I had to write my own code and assign it to keyboard keys so I could zoom and I don't have a programmable keyboard. It sounds like Logitech needs to hire better help. My dogs are pretty good coders and they only charge $50 an hour. This device may be usable if you only do office work.Now let's get to why we are here, the Kensington Expert Wireless Trackball.I know there have been complaints about the scroll ring but I don't know why. I love it. It is a thing of beauty. It is located in just the right place and requires just the right amount of pressure to operate. People who don't like it need to get out more. I find the ball really big making it a bit awkward for me. It takes some getting used to. It is also quite heavy. Even with the software set to the fastest speed it takes some hand effort to get the pointer across the screen. It's like watching molasses in January. This is something I don't need. After a couple of hours I end up with hand pain. I need a trackball I can use all day. I find the upper buttons awkward to use. Reaching across that big ball every time I want to do a double-click is a bit awkward. I haven't been able to double-click in 25 years. I have to have a button do it for me, so yeah, this is awkward. Having four buttons beneath the ball I think would be a better design. The good news is you don't have to be a programmer to use this device.SummaryLogitech M570 Wireless Trackball - use if you are a masochistLogitech Trackman Marble Mouse - use if you are only going to do office work or you are a programmerKensington Expert Wireless Trackball - use if you have healthy hands and are not a programmer 3
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