• I/O Crest 2 Port eSATA III or 2 Port SATA III Non-RAID PCIe 2.0 x1 Hard Drive Controller Card Asmedia ASM1601 Chipset
  • I/O Crest 2 Port eSATA III or 2 Port SATA III Non-RAID PCIe 2.0 x1 Hard Drive Controller Card Asmedia ASM1601 Chipset
  • I/O Crest 2 Port eSATA III or 2 Port SATA III Non-RAID PCIe 2.0 x1 Hard Drive Controller Card Asmedia ASM1601 Chipset
  • I/O Crest 2 Port eSATA III or 2 Port SATA III Non-RAID PCIe 2.0 x1 Hard Drive Controller Card Asmedia ASM1601 Chipset
  • I/O Crest 2 Port eSATA III or 2 Port SATA III Non-RAID PCIe 2.0 x1 Hard Drive Controller Card Asmedia ASM1601 Chipset
  • I/O Crest 2 Port eSATA III or 2 Port SATA III Non-RAID PCIe 2.0 x1 Hard Drive Controller Card Asmedia ASM1601 Chipset
  • I/O Crest 2 Port eSATA III or 2 Port SATA III Non-RAID PCIe 2.0 x1 Hard Drive Controller Card Asmedia ASM1601 Chipset
I/O Crest 2 Port eSATA III or 2 Port SATA III Non-RAID PCIe 2.0 x1 Hard Drive Controller Card Asmedia ASM1601 Chipset
I/O Crest 2 Port eSATA III or 2 Port SATA III Non-RAID PCIe 2.0 x1 Hard Drive Controller Card Asmedia ASM1601 Chipset
I/O Crest 2 Port eSATA III or 2 Port SATA III Non-RAID PCIe 2.0 x1 Hard Drive Controller Card Asmedia ASM1601 Chipset
I/O Crest 2 Port eSATA III or 2 Port SATA III Non-RAID PCIe 2.0 x1 Hard Drive Controller Card Asmedia ASM1601 Chipset
I/O Crest 2 Port eSATA III or 2 Port SATA III Non-RAID PCIe 2.0 x1 Hard Drive Controller Card Asmedia ASM1601 Chipset
I/O Crest 2 Port eSATA III or 2 Port SATA III Non-RAID PCIe 2.0 x1 Hard Drive Controller Card Asmedia ASM1601 Chipset
I/O Crest 2 Port eSATA III or 2 Port SATA III Non-RAID PCIe 2.0 x1 Hard Drive Controller Card Asmedia ASM1601 Chipset

I/O Crest 2 Port eSATA III or 2 Port SATA III Non-RAID PCIe 2.0 x1 Hard Drive Controller Card Asmedia ASM1601 Chipset

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  • Based on as media ASM1061 PCI-Express 2.0 SATA 6Gbps controller
  • 1-Lane PCI-Express 2.0 interface supports communication speed of 2.5Gbps and 5.0Gbps
  • The LED Blinks for read/write activity on any one of the Hard Drive connected to the motherboard or to this Add-on card
  • SATA 6.0Gbps Ports (internally, Externally or their combination)
  • Compatible with SATA-III (6Gbps), SATA-II (3Gbps), SATA-I (1.5Gbps) Hard drives and SSD's
  • ASMedia ASM1061 PCI-Express 2.0 SATA 6Gbps Controller
  • The LED Blinks for Read/Write Activity on Any One of the Hard Drive Connected to the Motherboard or to This Add-on Card
  • Compliant with PCI-Express 2.0 Base Specification

Customer Reviews

Works great in Linux I'm using 3 of these in a Gentoo NAS server I built, using an Asus 990fx chipset in AHCI mode, and they all work flawlessly. I don't use their built in software raid, I prefer mdraid management. I have all 3TB WD Red drives in it, and it should work with 4TB just the same. On the 8 drive raid10 array across two of these cards - I can reach speeds of over 600mb/s on sync, 300mb/s write, and 500mb/s read. These are taken on an ext4 partiton that is 85% full and has been used heavily (read/write/deletes) for 6+ months and is about 4% non-contigous.Overall I'm pretty happy with this SATA card. I have 2x 8 drive arrays in this server and I trust these with it's valuable information. So far there has been 100% uptime without the slightest hiccup or problem. For the price I don't think they can be beat. I had a couple HighPoint PCI cards, and after one of them died after only a couple years of use I just don't trust them anymore. 5Works Great for Ubuntu LINUXWe had an old PC that had Win 7 installed on it. One night during a bad storm, we had a slight power surge, which messed up the SATA controller on the motherboard and the C: drive HD. We weren't really using the PC any more, so I decided to make this a LINUX box just to play with if I could get it running again.I installed this card in the PC and hooked up a blank hard drive (HD) and a DVD drive to this card. I stuck in an Ubuntu LINUX installation DVD, and the computer booted right up, installed Ubuntu LINUX, and it has worked great ever since. The HD boots up every time.I had no idea if this would work, or if the PC was ruined. For about $20, I have a new toy to play with -- which sure beat having to just recycle it.5Satisfactory for my needsI replaced another eSATA card I had recently purchased (which simply just did not work!) with this one. This one is working fine for me on Windows 7 with a new Skylake Core i5 (yes I know it's supposedly not supported on Windows 7 - but it's working, so there!).I won't name the "other" brand that wouldn't work (actually it worked, but drives would drop offline after 20 to 30 minutes). I chose this one because it used a different controller chip than the first one. What can I say other than it works and that's what I was looking for?I do not care about performance, so this review should not be interpreted as a commentary on how fast it is compared to anything else.5not goodhad to return item not do anything described not run ssds at 6gbs will not hookup at all on outside esata do not recommend buying..card setups as scsi drive not 6 gbs second..ive used 2 port asmedia 6 gbs card no problen for ssd before ..this card evedentlsynot built right doe not talk your pc properly at all..1Doesn't work, in any modeI had just ordered a similar product from a different manufacturer, had no problems. This one, though...Package comes in, device looks good, manual is easy to understand, physical install & driver install is super easy.Unfortunately, it doesn't work. Tried on a windows 7 & a windows 10 device. Shows in my hardware profile, but nothing I plug into ever shows. Was told to move the pins on the jumper, but still no luck. Tried the pin configurations in the pamphlet, nothing. Tried the ones Support suggested, nothing. Neither the ATA or USB ports read anything.Furthermore, the USB slots are ultra tiny/slim so any USB device is a pain to use.Waste of money, & time.1Works, but still hangs for 20 sec. even with 2 SATA drives plugged in... Like many others, I needed to add more drives than I had SATA ports on my motherboard. So, I bought the 8 port version figuring that I'd run out of room in my case before I run out of SATA ports. Not a bad position to be in considering that programs (especially games) are taking more hard drive real estate all the time.I read about the card hanging in bootup if you didn't have any drives connected. I connected a 1TB SSD and a 10TB regular HD to it prior to powering up. It still hangs for about 20 seconds which really negates investing in an M.2 as my OS bootup device.The "manual" is short, but hardly sweet. The portion explaining the jumpers for SATA and ESATA were easy to understand, but not the recommendation if the card hangs with drives connected. It says to give PCI boot priority if it hangs. I can only assume that it's referring to the MB bios, but I don't see anything in my X299 Prime ASUS Deluxe bios or it's manual.If and when I can resolve the hanging on bootup I'd rate this device with 5 stars as the speed is nearly as good as the MB's SATA. 3Performed better than my excepectation. FIRST. If you have an open PCIe 16x slot, use it, unless you have a 4x. Performed better than my expectations, which were that it would work 80-90% vs connected to main drive controller.By Itself I notice no loss in speed, but in many situation it is faster.for example I have hooked into my second PCIe16x slot, which because of GPU, is set to 4x by the MoBo hardware.I have two Raid 0's, one HDD and the other SSD.And I have those both partitioned into two partitions.Transfer between partitions is much faster than normal, as if it does not need to send data through main controller.Normally your speed is cut in half, reading and writing to the same drive.Also transfers between the 2 RAID0 stripes is also faster, not in total speed, but in a much higher average.I may record some tests, but it is not uncommon to move files from SSD stripe to HDD stripe and average 230-300 or more.Depends on file sizes mostly, even small files. Example one game was about 33GB and had 36k files so 1 MB average.Still stayed above 60 MB most of the time, and usually average stays in high 70's, but Large single files can sustain over 200MB/sec. when my HDDs alone normally max out at 144, best case. So I am getting about 175-180%.[I am only going by windows 7, which the speed Displayed is overall avg]This controller seems must faster on the average, max speed is about the same.BTW I am using a PCIe 16x slot, working at 4x because of GPU.And My MoBo is nothing fancy, and not new [AsRock 970 Extreme 3 R 2.0 socket AM3+]Oh yeah and like it says It can connect to a full PCIe 16x, in fact any PCIe will work inn a 16x slot.But my board lowers the second 16x slot to 4x, which is what you need to get the full benefits of this card.So Remember as long as you have a free full PCIe16x you can connect to it.I forget who recommended this card, but i thanked them.And there is a reason there are so many other cards that are very cheap, well they are for a reason.I originally intended to use only 2 of my drives, as I was running out of connections.Now i know why people were talking about SSD and SSD stripe speeds.I Imagine it would possibly be a bit faster, and much faster on average with a better Mobo 5Case of disappearing drives I purchased this 8 port controller to replace the second HP P411 controller. Why I did is another story. After connecting (8) 4TB Seagate hard drives and powering up the server expecting to see 8 happy new 4TB drives available what I saw confirmed what other's who report single star ratings for this product. Only (3) of the new 4TB drives showed up. What was really frustrating is that I needed the space NOW. So I prepped the four and configured them as RAID 5 in my storage pool then thin parity so I could scale as my needs grew.Within 12 hours, after I had begun moving data to the partition it became degraded and off line. It's waiting for the missing drive to come back on line.At this point I'm pulling the 8 Port controller and will replace it with (2) 4 Port controllers as another reviewer suggested.If you buy one of these 8 Port controllers and experience problems later, remember the single star reviews and hope you have a backup. Thankfully I control my own backups and will go to Plan B. Extend the Labor Day vacation to 10 days while I locate replacement 4 Port controllers and move data around until all of my data is settled in the correct configuration.Then this 8 Port useless piece of tin, fiberglass and silicone will be returned with a note recommending they stop selling this model.Take the 1 star reviewers' advice and get something different unless you're ready to gamble with your data. 1Satisfied customer with a quality product Edit (3/8/2013): The description for this product states that it doesn't support SSD drives, but my Crucial M4 64GB and now my Kingston Hyperx 3k 250GB SSD drives both work wonderfully on it.Let me give a little background. I originally bought a Crucial M4 64GB SSD drive so I could give my new gaming rig the extra push that I always wanted. After installing the SSD to my 1 year old ASUS motherboard, I noticed that my speeds weren't quite what I was fully expecting, even after tweaking and Q&A'ing the support forums. It was narrowed down to my motherboard which contains a simple AMD 880G chipset with SATAII connections. While this is perfectly fine with ordinary hard drive, it becomes a bottleneck for SSD's.That scenario led me to this product. I sought for a way to gain SATAIII connections without replacing my current motherboard. This product does just that. I made sure I had an empty PCIe x1 card slot open and checked the specs and reviews. Shipping and packaging was good as always. Installation was easy and I downloaded the latest AHCI drivers from the manufacturers website ([...]). Installing an ordinary hard drive to this is not going to give any performance increase, but it is definitely worth the investment here. I can recommend this for anyone with SSD's with a slow chipset (mainly AMD's). As evidence below, I recorded a 35% increase in performance via total score. Easily worth a $20 investment.For those interested, this PCIe performs on par with the Marvell controller.Results of AS-SSD benchmark testing:Using SATAII 880G chipset slot:Seq:Read 255 MB/sWrite 109 MB/s4K:Read 19 MB/sWrite 42 MB/s4K-64Thrd:Read 150 MB/sWrite 89 MB/sAcc time:Read .132 msWrite .259 msScore:Read 196Write 143Total score: 438Using Syba SATAIII slot:Seq:Read 366 MB/sWrite 110 MB/s4KRead 23 MB/sWrite 72 MB/s4K-64ThrdRead 216 MB/sWrite 97 MB/sAcc TimeRead .102 msWrite .257ScoreRead 276Write 181Total594 5Running smooth with FreeNas Very happy with the card so far in my FreeNas setup. Getting a mobo with large amounts of sata 3 ports can be tough with out dropping a lot of cash and this has saved me from going out and getting one. Easy to install and hookup your drives since the ports are on the side. Added bonus it has green LEDs on the actual card that flash during activity (if you have a view into your case). Thanks IO Crest. 5Pretty good card but the jumpers documentation is off.So far the card is working fine. I find it really odd though that a card with external ports would be set default to internal. As others have said the instructions that come with it are very vague. The picture that came for the jumper settings appeared to show it already set on external. However, those did not work and I had to remove the card and change them just based on other reviewers' feedback and it worked fine after that. I have not tried hooking up more than 1 Esata cable to it at a time yet but the one that is goes to a RAID box and works fine for picking up the 3 drives that are in the RAID.4Works great with my SSDWorks great for my use case. I have a BIOSTAR Hi-Fi A85W and tried two different SSD and I kept getting freezes where the HD activity light stays on and the system becomes non-responsive (except for the mouse) for about 30 seconds. Then the HD activity goes back to normal and the system is responsive again. It kept doing this and it drove me crazy. So, I decided to plug this card into my computer and try connecting the SSD to this card's SATA ports instead of the motherboard's SATA ports. I can boot from the SSD connected to the card and it doesn't add too much extra time when booting. So far I haven't had any freezes in 2 days of use. I'm very happy with my purchase. The only problem is the fit with my motherboard and case. It doesn't fit flush with the case (the top of the screw plate is about 1/8 inch too high) so I'm dinging it 1 star.4Good card, nice performance, happy with it.In my quest to find a card that works well with Windows 8.1 and has good performance - I chose this card. Overall I'm happy with it, although out of the box it would not work. You have to change the jumper settings in order to get the card to work depending on your configuration. Not a big deal but something to be aware of. Read the manual!Initially I got great performance from this card, several hundred MB/sec transfer speeds (copying from SSD drives). Overall its leveled off and I get varying levels of performance out of it. Its not the best card out there, but its not a bad option either. It does not have RAID support, but it does have port multiplier functionality so it works with my external drive enclosure.I'm using Windows storage spaces to enable some limited RAID functionality and so far I'm very happy with the performance and functionality. No driver issues with Windows 8.1 either, but download the latest one from the website, go to the chipset makers site and get the newer driver, not from the card manufacturer itself.4Just worksI have struggled quite a bit to find an eSATA controller that works in my environment: - XPS 8900 - Linux - 2 Addonics HDD enclosures with Sil3132 chipset based port-multipler - 4 drives in each enclosure with individual drive capacities ranging from 1.5TB to 5TBThe issues I encountered with other controllers: - The XPS 8900's PCIe 3.0 motherboard doesn't discover PCI 1.x devices, which still account for a large number of eSATA adapters and 100% of the Sil3132 based ones. - The Marvell 88SE9128 chipset based controller I tried didn't play well with the Sil3132 port multiplier: difficulty negotiating eSATA speeds, discovering drives, and only recognized one port multiplier at a time.So I was elated when I found that this adapter just works on all fronts. It is successfully detected by the BIOS and the OS (Linux) out of the box, quickly establishes connection with the enclosures, detects all (8) drives on both ports. And (so far) it seems to correctly support large (4TB and 5TB) drives, concurrent I/Os to the same port as well as hot-plug & hot-unplug.5Excellant product after sorting the Amazon reviews Once I got past all of the negative reviews I found this to be a great addition to my older system. The problem wasn't that this card received a lot of bad reviews, it was that Amazon lumped all the reviews together for various Marvell based cards. After sorting through all of the various reviews and selecting only those that actually applied to te 88SE9230 specific card I found it mostly had 4 or more stars. After checking to be sure I had an available PCIe 2.0 x2 slot (Had an x8 slot) I ordered this board. Under Windows 10 I just had to plug in the board, run the Sata cables, disable the motherboard Sata controller, and power up in the safe mode. Safe mode power up was needed so Windows 10 could install the AHCI drivers. Wish I could give Amazon one star for the way they lump together the reviews. 5This card makes `lspci` crash my system This IO Crest 2-port SATA III PCI-E 1x card with ASmedia ASM1601 controller is the least Linux-compatible device I have ever used. I tried it on Ubuntu 17.10 on Xen, in an Asus Prime X370 Pro motherboard, with a Toshiba SSD hooked up to it. The board is a UEFI board, and CSM was enabled. The system would boot up fine, and I would see the extra boot screen from the card's option ROM, where it detected my attached drive without issue. The card was actually detected fine by Linux, and tried talking to the drive. Unfortunately, that's as far as I got with it. The card had IO errors trying to talk to the attached disk, so Linux gave up and disconnected the disk from the system. On my motherboard's built-in SATA controller, the disk works just fine. Also, when this device was installed, I was getting errors in dmesg from my video driver (nouveau); I'm not sure how to explain that, and video still worked fine.All that could have been ignored, though, though. The device doesn't actually claim to support Linux, and I wanted to use the device for PCI passthrough to a Windows guest, so Linux doesn't actually have to work with it correctly. But the real problem I have with this card is: it makes the `lspci` command, which lists installed PCI-E cards, crash the system! Running lspci, which normally takes a few tenths of a second, would take a second or more (and lock up the whole machine for that time) with the card installed, and one time out of the three I ran it it managed to crash the system entirely. A bit of research suggests that this can occur when a PCI device reports malformed configuration information. This problem is probably not going to go away if I pass the card through to a Windows VM, even if the VM would be able to make the card actually talk to drives.Needless to say, I can't keep a piece of hardware that lets an unprivileged user bring down the entire machine with a single command. I'll have to trade up for a more robust card with a more useful interpretation of the PCI-E spec. 1Only recognizes PCI Express Gen 1 Most of us using this card are probably getting it for the SATA III capabilities, which max out at what, around 600MB/s? Of course, in order to use that, you need PCI Express Gen 2, which has max throughput of 500MB/s. If you don't have that latter item, this card is rather a waste, isn't it?This card has no configurable BIOS options (no "press Ctrl+F for options" after your system finishes posting) but on three separate systems I tried it with, it said "Using PCI-E Gen 1" on each one. I know that all the systems had PCI Express Gen 2, but yet between that warning and my benchmark speeds using a Crucial M4 128GB SSD, I had terrible results. My ASRock motherboard's built in SATA II controller was pushing 207MB/s, but with this card, I was only hitting ~170MB/s.Syba's support wasn't helpful - they gave me one email saying "try it in another slot!" and that was about it. I guess I got what I paid for, but Syba (or ASMedia? The box and BIOS don't mention Syba whatsoever) Thanks for accepting my return so promptly, Amazon! 2Worked Perfectly First TimeWorked perfectly first time. I changed the jumper settings to have one internal SATA connection and one external eSATA connection. At the time I bought it, I didn't realize this circuit board only allows you have a choice of two total SATA connections. But that's all I needed, so it still met my needs. You can choose both internal connectors, both external connectors or one internal and one external connection. It took a few minutes to understand the jumper setting scheme, but once I did finally understand, it was straightforward. I believe they should have shown pictorials of the possible settings and which connectors get activated. But instead they created a chart for the buyer to determine how to do it. If you activate only one of the external eSATA connectors, you'll either have to memorize which of the two connectors is active or you'll need to label it.It comes with an installation CD disk, but I went to their website to make sure I got the very latest version software driver file. I didn't check to see if the CD was up to date. It may have the latest driver for all I know. There is a short cable to connect to the disk indicator in the event this becomes your boot disk. I am only using it for a secondary storage disk, so I didn't use the cable.5Easy way to add more ports to a HackintoshI have this installed in my newly built Hackintosh. It worked out of the box with no kext editing or bootloader changes. I moved the jumpers over to the eSATA position and it sees my external devices with no problems. I don't think Mac OS X has support for eSATA hot swapping (as no stock Macs include it), so swapping drives is probably out of the question. But I have no need for that. I leave my TowerSTOR TS2CT - 2 Bay SATA to USB 2.0 / eSATA / 1394a / 1394b RAID Enclosure connected 24/7 anyway.The card includes a pass through for the hard drive LED so any drive access from the motherboard in addition to the SATA card will blink your case drive LED. Nice little addition.UPDATE: I should add that I had an issue connecting an LG HD DVD/Blu-ray combo drive to this card. The drive was reporting it had a disc in the drive with zero size. Switching to my onboard SATA solved the issue. It's possible these have an incompatibly with optical drives. No big deal as I don't know of any which need higher than SATA 1.5 Gbit, so any onboard controller will work for them.UPDATE 2: It's now about a year later and I needed a second card. I ordered a new one and it's now a basic green PCB with slightly different circuitry. Works exactly the same from what I can tell and uses the same controller. I have uploaded a picture with both.5SY-PEX40039, Asmedia 1061 SATA3 PCI 2.0 x1 SY-PEX40039, Asmedia 1061 SATA III PCI 2.0 x 1 cardFor just $16, I could hardly give this card less than 5 stars. But the drivers on the enclosed mini-CD do not work for AMD motherboards. Instead, download the 1.1 driver, updated on 7/1/2015, from www dot sybausa dot com/index.php?route=product/product&path=64_77_85&product_id=151&filter=83,38,19,72,18(Re Amazon guidelines: PLEASE allow this link. The manufacturer does not volunteer this driver, and your purchasers with AMD motherboards are unlikely to ever find where it is hidden, without this link.)Any PCIe x 1 card is architecturally limited to a maximum of 4 Gbps or 500 MB/s, no matter how fast the onboard chipset processes data internally. Although the SATA III specification allows for 6 Gbps or 750 MB/s, that is not attainable unless both the SATA III card and the slot are at least PCIe 2.0, and both have greater width than x 1.Each byte (8 bits) transferred has 2 bits of communications overhead (8b 10b); 10 bits transferred provides 8 bits of information. Therefore, 500 MB/s each way is actually 400 MB/s of data, along with 100 MB/s of overhead.I have an aging Mushkin Chronos SSD, 550/520 MB/s r/w, and an SY-PEX40039 PCIe x 1 card in a PCIe 2.0 x 1 slot. Atto reports 402 MB/s read and 342 MB/s write for file sizes 1 MB, as opposed to 275/250 MB/s r/w with the onboard SATA II. I'm good with that. 4
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Customer Reviews

Works great in Linux I'm using 3 of these in a Gentoo NAS server I built, using an Asus 990fx chipset in AHCI mode, and they all work flawlessly. I don't use their built in software raid, I prefer mdraid management. I have all 3TB WD Red drives in it, and it should work with 4TB just the same. On the 8 drive raid10 array across two of these cards - I can reach speeds of over 600mb/s on sync, 300mb/s write, and 500mb/s read. These are taken on an ext4 partiton that is 85% full and has been used heavily (read/write/deletes) for 6+ months and is about 4% non-contigous.Overall I'm pretty happy with this SATA card. I have 2x 8 drive arrays in this server and I trust these with it's valuable information. So far there has been 100% uptime without the slightest hiccup or problem. For the price I don't think they can be beat. I had a couple HighPoint PCI cards, and after one of them died after only a couple years of use I just don't trust them anymore. 5Works Great for Ubuntu LINUXWe had an old PC that had Win 7 installed on it. One night during a bad storm, we had a slight power surge, which messed up the SATA controller on the motherboard and the C: drive HD. We weren't really using the PC any more, so I decided to make this a LINUX box just to play with if I could get it running again.I installed this card in the PC and hooked up a blank hard drive (HD) and a DVD drive to this card. I stuck in an Ubuntu LINUX installation DVD, and the computer booted right up, installed Ubuntu LINUX, and it has worked great ever since. The HD boots up every time.I had no idea if this would work, or if the PC was ruined. For about $20, I have a new toy to play with -- which sure beat having to just recycle it.5Satisfactory for my needsI replaced another eSATA card I had recently purchased (which simply just did not work!) with this one. This one is working fine for me on Windows 7 with a new Skylake Core i5 (yes I know it's supposedly not supported on Windows 7 - but it's working, so there!).I won't name the "other" brand that wouldn't work (actually it worked, but drives would drop offline after 20 to 30 minutes). I chose this one because it used a different controller chip than the first one. What can I say other than it works and that's what I was looking for?I do not care about performance, so this review should not be interpreted as a commentary on how fast it is compared to anything else.5not goodhad to return item not do anything described not run ssds at 6gbs will not hookup at all on outside esata do not recommend buying..card setups as scsi drive not 6 gbs second..ive used 2 port asmedia 6 gbs card no problen for ssd before ..this card evedentlsynot built right doe not talk your pc properly at all..1Doesn't work, in any modeI had just ordered a similar product from a different manufacturer, had no problems. This one, though...Package comes in, device looks good, manual is easy to understand, physical install & driver install is super easy.Unfortunately, it doesn't work. Tried on a windows 7 & a windows 10 device. Shows in my hardware profile, but nothing I plug into ever shows. Was told to move the pins on the jumper, but still no luck. Tried the pin configurations in the pamphlet, nothing. Tried the ones Support suggested, nothing. Neither the ATA or USB ports read anything.Furthermore, the USB slots are ultra tiny/slim so any USB device is a pain to use.Waste of money, & time.1Works, but still hangs for 20 sec. even with 2 SATA drives plugged in... Like many others, I needed to add more drives than I had SATA ports on my motherboard. So, I bought the 8 port version figuring that I'd run out of room in my case before I run out of SATA ports. Not a bad position to be in considering that programs (especially games) are taking more hard drive real estate all the time.I read about the card hanging in bootup if you didn't have any drives connected. I connected a 1TB SSD and a 10TB regular HD to it prior to powering up. It still hangs for about 20 seconds which really negates investing in an M.2 as my OS bootup device.The "manual" is short, but hardly sweet. The portion explaining the jumpers for SATA and ESATA were easy to understand, but not the recommendation if the card hangs with drives connected. It says to give PCI boot priority if it hangs. I can only assume that it's referring to the MB bios, but I don't see anything in my X299 Prime ASUS Deluxe bios or it's manual.If and when I can resolve the hanging on bootup I'd rate this device with 5 stars as the speed is nearly as good as the MB's SATA. 3Performed better than my excepectation. FIRST. If you have an open PCIe 16x slot, use it, unless you have a 4x. Performed better than my expectations, which were that it would work 80-90% vs connected to main drive controller.By Itself I notice no loss in speed, but in many situation it is faster.for example I have hooked into my second PCIe16x slot, which because of GPU, is set to 4x by the MoBo hardware.I have two Raid 0's, one HDD and the other SSD.And I have those both partitioned into two partitions.Transfer between partitions is much faster than normal, as if it does not need to send data through main controller.Normally your speed is cut in half, reading and writing to the same drive.Also transfers between the 2 RAID0 stripes is also faster, not in total speed, but in a much higher average.I may record some tests, but it is not uncommon to move files from SSD stripe to HDD stripe and average 230-300 or more.Depends on file sizes mostly, even small files. Example one game was about 33GB and had 36k files so 1 MB average.Still stayed above 60 MB most of the time, and usually average stays in high 70's, but Large single files can sustain over 200MB/sec. when my HDDs alone normally max out at 144, best case. So I am getting about 175-180%.[I am only going by windows 7, which the speed Displayed is overall avg]This controller seems must faster on the average, max speed is about the same.BTW I am using a PCIe 16x slot, working at 4x because of GPU.And My MoBo is nothing fancy, and not new [AsRock 970 Extreme 3 R 2.0 socket AM3+]Oh yeah and like it says It can connect to a full PCIe 16x, in fact any PCIe will work inn a 16x slot.But my board lowers the second 16x slot to 4x, which is what you need to get the full benefits of this card.So Remember as long as you have a free full PCIe16x you can connect to it.I forget who recommended this card, but i thanked them.And there is a reason there are so many other cards that are very cheap, well they are for a reason.I originally intended to use only 2 of my drives, as I was running out of connections.Now i know why people were talking about SSD and SSD stripe speeds.I Imagine it would possibly be a bit faster, and much faster on average with a better Mobo 5Case of disappearing drives I purchased this 8 port controller to replace the second HP P411 controller. Why I did is another story. After connecting (8) 4TB Seagate hard drives and powering up the server expecting to see 8 happy new 4TB drives available what I saw confirmed what other's who report single star ratings for this product. Only (3) of the new 4TB drives showed up. What was really frustrating is that I needed the space NOW. So I prepped the four and configured them as RAID 5 in my storage pool then thin parity so I could scale as my needs grew.Within 12 hours, after I had begun moving data to the partition it became degraded and off line. It's waiting for the missing drive to come back on line.At this point I'm pulling the 8 Port controller and will replace it with (2) 4 Port controllers as another reviewer suggested.If you buy one of these 8 Port controllers and experience problems later, remember the single star reviews and hope you have a backup. Thankfully I control my own backups and will go to Plan B. Extend the Labor Day vacation to 10 days while I locate replacement 4 Port controllers and move data around until all of my data is settled in the correct configuration.Then this 8 Port useless piece of tin, fiberglass and silicone will be returned with a note recommending they stop selling this model.Take the 1 star reviewers' advice and get something different unless you're ready to gamble with your data. 1Satisfied customer with a quality product Edit (3/8/2013): The description for this product states that it doesn't support SSD drives, but my Crucial M4 64GB and now my Kingston Hyperx 3k 250GB SSD drives both work wonderfully on it.Let me give a little background. I originally bought a Crucial M4 64GB SSD drive so I could give my new gaming rig the extra push that I always wanted. After installing the SSD to my 1 year old ASUS motherboard, I noticed that my speeds weren't quite what I was fully expecting, even after tweaking and Q&A'ing the support forums. It was narrowed down to my motherboard which contains a simple AMD 880G chipset with SATAII connections. While this is perfectly fine with ordinary hard drive, it becomes a bottleneck for SSD's.That scenario led me to this product. I sought for a way to gain SATAIII connections without replacing my current motherboard. This product does just that. I made sure I had an empty PCIe x1 card slot open and checked the specs and reviews. Shipping and packaging was good as always. Installation was easy and I downloaded the latest AHCI drivers from the manufacturers website ([...]). Installing an ordinary hard drive to this is not going to give any performance increase, but it is definitely worth the investment here. I can recommend this for anyone with SSD's with a slow chipset (mainly AMD's). As evidence below, I recorded a 35% increase in performance via total score. Easily worth a $20 investment.For those interested, this PCIe performs on par with the Marvell controller.Results of AS-SSD benchmark testing:Using SATAII 880G chipset slot:Seq:Read 255 MB/sWrite 109 MB/s4K:Read 19 MB/sWrite 42 MB/s4K-64Thrd:Read 150 MB/sWrite 89 MB/sAcc time:Read .132 msWrite .259 msScore:Read 196Write 143Total score: 438Using Syba SATAIII slot:Seq:Read 366 MB/sWrite 110 MB/s4KRead 23 MB/sWrite 72 MB/s4K-64ThrdRead 216 MB/sWrite 97 MB/sAcc TimeRead .102 msWrite .257ScoreRead 276Write 181Total594 5Running smooth with FreeNas Very happy with the card so far in my FreeNas setup. Getting a mobo with large amounts of sata 3 ports can be tough with out dropping a lot of cash and this has saved me from going out and getting one. Easy to install and hookup your drives since the ports are on the side. Added bonus it has green LEDs on the actual card that flash during activity (if you have a view into your case). Thanks IO Crest. 5Pretty good card but the jumpers documentation is off.So far the card is working fine. I find it really odd though that a card with external ports would be set default to internal. As others have said the instructions that come with it are very vague. The picture that came for the jumper settings appeared to show it already set on external. However, those did not work and I had to remove the card and change them just based on other reviewers' feedback and it worked fine after that. I have not tried hooking up more than 1 Esata cable to it at a time yet but the one that is goes to a RAID box and works fine for picking up the 3 drives that are in the RAID.4Works great with my SSDWorks great for my use case. I have a BIOSTAR Hi-Fi A85W and tried two different SSD and I kept getting freezes where the HD activity light stays on and the system becomes non-responsive (except for the mouse) for about 30 seconds. Then the HD activity goes back to normal and the system is responsive again. It kept doing this and it drove me crazy. So, I decided to plug this card into my computer and try connecting the SSD to this card's SATA ports instead of the motherboard's SATA ports. I can boot from the SSD connected to the card and it doesn't add too much extra time when booting. So far I haven't had any freezes in 2 days of use. I'm very happy with my purchase. The only problem is the fit with my motherboard and case. It doesn't fit flush with the case (the top of the screw plate is about 1/8 inch too high) so I'm dinging it 1 star.4Good card, nice performance, happy with it.In my quest to find a card that works well with Windows 8.1 and has good performance - I chose this card. Overall I'm happy with it, although out of the box it would not work. You have to change the jumper settings in order to get the card to work depending on your configuration. Not a big deal but something to be aware of. Read the manual!Initially I got great performance from this card, several hundred MB/sec transfer speeds (copying from SSD drives). Overall its leveled off and I get varying levels of performance out of it. Its not the best card out there, but its not a bad option either. It does not have RAID support, but it does have port multiplier functionality so it works with my external drive enclosure.I'm using Windows storage spaces to enable some limited RAID functionality and so far I'm very happy with the performance and functionality. No driver issues with Windows 8.1 either, but download the latest one from the website, go to the chipset makers site and get the newer driver, not from the card manufacturer itself.4Just worksI have struggled quite a bit to find an eSATA controller that works in my environment: - XPS 8900 - Linux - 2 Addonics HDD enclosures with Sil3132 chipset based port-multipler - 4 drives in each enclosure with individual drive capacities ranging from 1.5TB to 5TBThe issues I encountered with other controllers: - The XPS 8900's PCIe 3.0 motherboard doesn't discover PCI 1.x devices, which still account for a large number of eSATA adapters and 100% of the Sil3132 based ones. - The Marvell 88SE9128 chipset based controller I tried didn't play well with the Sil3132 port multiplier: difficulty negotiating eSATA speeds, discovering drives, and only recognized one port multiplier at a time.So I was elated when I found that this adapter just works on all fronts. It is successfully detected by the BIOS and the OS (Linux) out of the box, quickly establishes connection with the enclosures, detects all (8) drives on both ports. And (so far) it seems to correctly support large (4TB and 5TB) drives, concurrent I/Os to the same port as well as hot-plug & hot-unplug.5Excellant product after sorting the Amazon reviews Once I got past all of the negative reviews I found this to be a great addition to my older system. The problem wasn't that this card received a lot of bad reviews, it was that Amazon lumped all the reviews together for various Marvell based cards. After sorting through all of the various reviews and selecting only those that actually applied to te 88SE9230 specific card I found it mostly had 4 or more stars. After checking to be sure I had an available PCIe 2.0 x2 slot (Had an x8 slot) I ordered this board. Under Windows 10 I just had to plug in the board, run the Sata cables, disable the motherboard Sata controller, and power up in the safe mode. Safe mode power up was needed so Windows 10 could install the AHCI drivers. Wish I could give Amazon one star for the way they lump together the reviews. 5This card makes `lspci` crash my system This IO Crest 2-port SATA III PCI-E 1x card with ASmedia ASM1601 controller is the least Linux-compatible device I have ever used. I tried it on Ubuntu 17.10 on Xen, in an Asus Prime X370 Pro motherboard, with a Toshiba SSD hooked up to it. The board is a UEFI board, and CSM was enabled. The system would boot up fine, and I would see the extra boot screen from the card's option ROM, where it detected my attached drive without issue. The card was actually detected fine by Linux, and tried talking to the drive. Unfortunately, that's as far as I got with it. The card had IO errors trying to talk to the attached disk, so Linux gave up and disconnected the disk from the system. On my motherboard's built-in SATA controller, the disk works just fine. Also, when this device was installed, I was getting errors in dmesg from my video driver (nouveau); I'm not sure how to explain that, and video still worked fine.All that could have been ignored, though, though. The device doesn't actually claim to support Linux, and I wanted to use the device for PCI passthrough to a Windows guest, so Linux doesn't actually have to work with it correctly. But the real problem I have with this card is: it makes the `lspci` command, which lists installed PCI-E cards, crash the system! Running lspci, which normally takes a few tenths of a second, would take a second or more (and lock up the whole machine for that time) with the card installed, and one time out of the three I ran it it managed to crash the system entirely. A bit of research suggests that this can occur when a PCI device reports malformed configuration information. This problem is probably not going to go away if I pass the card through to a Windows VM, even if the VM would be able to make the card actually talk to drives.Needless to say, I can't keep a piece of hardware that lets an unprivileged user bring down the entire machine with a single command. I'll have to trade up for a more robust card with a more useful interpretation of the PCI-E spec. 1Only recognizes PCI Express Gen 1 Most of us using this card are probably getting it for the SATA III capabilities, which max out at what, around 600MB/s? Of course, in order to use that, you need PCI Express Gen 2, which has max throughput of 500MB/s. If you don't have that latter item, this card is rather a waste, isn't it?This card has no configurable BIOS options (no "press Ctrl+F for options" after your system finishes posting) but on three separate systems I tried it with, it said "Using PCI-E Gen 1" on each one. I know that all the systems had PCI Express Gen 2, but yet between that warning and my benchmark speeds using a Crucial M4 128GB SSD, I had terrible results. My ASRock motherboard's built in SATA II controller was pushing 207MB/s, but with this card, I was only hitting ~170MB/s.Syba's support wasn't helpful - they gave me one email saying "try it in another slot!" and that was about it. I guess I got what I paid for, but Syba (or ASMedia? The box and BIOS don't mention Syba whatsoever) Thanks for accepting my return so promptly, Amazon! 2Worked Perfectly First TimeWorked perfectly first time. I changed the jumper settings to have one internal SATA connection and one external eSATA connection. At the time I bought it, I didn't realize this circuit board only allows you have a choice of two total SATA connections. But that's all I needed, so it still met my needs. You can choose both internal connectors, both external connectors or one internal and one external connection. It took a few minutes to understand the jumper setting scheme, but once I did finally understand, it was straightforward. I believe they should have shown pictorials of the possible settings and which connectors get activated. But instead they created a chart for the buyer to determine how to do it. If you activate only one of the external eSATA connectors, you'll either have to memorize which of the two connectors is active or you'll need to label it.It comes with an installation CD disk, but I went to their website to make sure I got the very latest version software driver file. I didn't check to see if the CD was up to date. It may have the latest driver for all I know. There is a short cable to connect to the disk indicator in the event this becomes your boot disk. I am only using it for a secondary storage disk, so I didn't use the cable.5Easy way to add more ports to a HackintoshI have this installed in my newly built Hackintosh. It worked out of the box with no kext editing or bootloader changes. I moved the jumpers over to the eSATA position and it sees my external devices with no problems. I don't think Mac OS X has support for eSATA hot swapping (as no stock Macs include it), so swapping drives is probably out of the question. But I have no need for that. I leave my TowerSTOR TS2CT - 2 Bay SATA to USB 2.0 / eSATA / 1394a / 1394b RAID Enclosure connected 24/7 anyway.The card includes a pass through for the hard drive LED so any drive access from the motherboard in addition to the SATA card will blink your case drive LED. Nice little addition.UPDATE: I should add that I had an issue connecting an LG HD DVD/Blu-ray combo drive to this card. The drive was reporting it had a disc in the drive with zero size. Switching to my onboard SATA solved the issue. It's possible these have an incompatibly with optical drives. No big deal as I don't know of any which need higher than SATA 1.5 Gbit, so any onboard controller will work for them.UPDATE 2: It's now about a year later and I needed a second card. I ordered a new one and it's now a basic green PCB with slightly different circuitry. Works exactly the same from what I can tell and uses the same controller. I have uploaded a picture with both.5SY-PEX40039, Asmedia 1061 SATA3 PCI 2.0 x1 SY-PEX40039, Asmedia 1061 SATA III PCI 2.0 x 1 cardFor just $16, I could hardly give this card less than 5 stars. But the drivers on the enclosed mini-CD do not work for AMD motherboards. Instead, download the 1.1 driver, updated on 7/1/2015, from www dot sybausa dot com/index.php?route=product/product&path=64_77_85&product_id=151&filter=83,38,19,72,18(Re Amazon guidelines: PLEASE allow this link. The manufacturer does not volunteer this driver, and your purchasers with AMD motherboards are unlikely to ever find where it is hidden, without this link.)Any PCIe x 1 card is architecturally limited to a maximum of 4 Gbps or 500 MB/s, no matter how fast the onboard chipset processes data internally. Although the SATA III specification allows for 6 Gbps or 750 MB/s, that is not attainable unless both the SATA III card and the slot are at least PCIe 2.0, and both have greater width than x 1.Each byte (8 bits) transferred has 2 bits of communications overhead (8b 10b); 10 bits transferred provides 8 bits of information. Therefore, 500 MB/s each way is actually 400 MB/s of data, along with 100 MB/s of overhead.I have an aging Mushkin Chronos SSD, 550/520 MB/s r/w, and an SY-PEX40039 PCIe x 1 card in a PCIe 2.0 x 1 slot. Atto reports 402 MB/s read and 342 MB/s write for file sizes 1 MB, as opposed to 275/250 MB/s r/w with the onboard SATA II. I'm good with that. 4
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