• Fotasy Manual Nikon Lens To M43 Adapter, F Mount Mft Converter, Fit Olympus E Pl8 E Pl9 E M1 E M5 E
  • Fotasy Manual Nikon Lens To M43 Adapter, F Mount Mft Converter, Fit Olympus E Pl8 E Pl9 E M1 E M5 E
  • Fotasy Manual Nikon Lens To M43 Adapter, F Mount Mft Converter, Fit Olympus E Pl8 E Pl9 E M1 E M5 E
  • Fotasy Manual Nikon Lens To M43 Adapter, F Mount Mft Converter, Fit Olympus E Pl8 E Pl9 E M1 E M5 E
  • Fotasy Manual Nikon Lens To M43 Adapter, F Mount Mft Converter, Fit Olympus E Pl8 E Pl9 E M1 E M5 E
Fotasy Manual Nikon Lens To M43 Adapter, F Mount Mft Converter, Fit Olympus E Pl8 E Pl9 E M1 E M5 E
Fotasy Manual Nikon Lens To M43 Adapter, F Mount Mft Converter, Fit Olympus E Pl8 E Pl9 E M1 E M5 E
Fotasy Manual Nikon Lens To M43 Adapter, F Mount Mft Converter, Fit Olympus E Pl8 E Pl9 E M1 E M5 E
Fotasy Manual Nikon Lens To M43 Adapter, F Mount Mft Converter, Fit Olympus E Pl8 E Pl9 E M1 E M5 E
Fotasy Manual Nikon Lens To M43 Adapter, F Mount Mft Converter, Fit Olympus E Pl8 E Pl9 E M1 E M5 E

Fotasy Manual Nikon Lens To M43 Adapter, F Mount Mft Converter, Fit Olympus E Pl8 E Pl9 E M1 E M5 E

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  • Allows Nikon F-mount lens to fit on Olympus/Panasonic micro 4/3 Mirrorless Digital Cameras
  • Infinity focus
  • Copper Lens mount, solid and durable.
  • There is no electrical contacts in the adapter ring. Automatic diaphragm, auto-focusing, or any other functions will not operated with using this adapter. Exposure and focus has to be adjusted manually.
  • Compatible with Olympus E-P5 E-PL6 E-PL7 E-PL8 OM-D E-M1 I II E-M1X E-M5 I II III E-PM2 E-PM1 PEN-F / Panasonic G5 G7 G9 GF5 GF6 GF7 GF8 GH3 GH4 GH5 GH5s GM1 GM5 GX1 GX2 GX7 GX8 GX9 GX85 GX80 GX850

Customer Reviews

Solid Adapter, works perfectly. This works perfectly. It mounts to a GH5 without any slop or fuss. Locks into place solidly and does not move. It's a little unclear exactly how the "locking" ring works, but you mount the lens to the adapter in the "LOCK" position. Once the lens is locked into place then you rotate the ring to the "OPEN" position and you have full control over the aperture - manually on the lens of course.I'd highly recommend this pass-through adapter rather than a "speed-booster" type, simply because you don't lose any sharpness and you don't introduce any color-shifting or fringing from the additional adapter-lens.You can't go wrong with the price - absolutely no reason to pay more. 5DIY Tilt Shift On the Cheap Truly a great tool if you are experimenting with "free-lensing". This is a technique whereby you detach your lens from your DSLR or mirroless camera and literally attempt focusing off camera with your left hand. While the technique can be easily attempted and maybe mastered in time by anyone, the modifications needed to your camera can be downright frightening and possibly damaging and just not worthwhile.One of the recommended modifications was to drill a hole in the center of your camera's body cap order to attach an accordian or bellows like tube which will connect your lens to your camera body. Since I was not in favor of drilling out perfectly useable body caps to experiment with, I looked for a better solution. The use of a T2 mount (telescope) was suggested as a cheaper and more secure alternative.My setup uses an old Mamya 645 80mm lens is stuck at F2.8 which is mated to a Olympus EPL2 which is a MFT camera. A 2.5" wide piece of 1/8" thick black foam sheet wrapped in two layers around the lens and T2 connector with two 11" black cable ties around the adapter and lens completes the setup. Because of the flexibility of the foam material, the lens is easily able to move horizontally and vertically and emulate those expensive tilt shift lens from Canon and Nikon. If you cannot afford these than this is a cheap way of getting into the medium. The foam sheets are 8"x11" @ 25 cents at Walmart or any other stores. Buy several sheets and give them a try. The T adapter is about 2" high, more than enough length to handle a regular lens. 5Great backup adapter I use this as a backup to my Metabones speed boosters on gh4-gh5. If I'm shooting something on a budget and don't want to rent/buy a Metabones, this adapter does almost the same thing for very little money. You don't get aperture adjustments on EF lenses, but most newer lenses are sharp anyways at f2.8 so it's not a deal breaker. One work around for this I've seen is if you have a Canon body you can set the aperture on the lens and then as you press the depth of field preview button, dismount the lens and the aperture will stay put at whatever you set it on. It's a slow workaround but works fine. Nikon lenses with adapters also work great. Overall a good little backup adapter! 5Works for Canon EF lenses on Blackmagic Pocket I have been using this to connect Canon EF lenses to my Blackmagic pocket camera. Things to know:1) It connects and disconnects without problems or damage.2) The adapter is extremely strong and well-built. Feels sturdy.3) This will not allow you to change aperture on electronic EF lenses. Set it to wide-open on a DSLR and then use ISO and shutter angle to expose properly.4) If you have an EF mount lens with a manual aperture ring, it will work great with this adapter on a Blackmagic pocket camera.5) The crop factor is roughly 3x, so my Tokina 11-16 looks like a 33-48mm (and it looks great!).6) If you have a lens that focuses electronically (not autofocus, just an electronic control), your focus ring won't work. I have many L-series Canon lenses and they all focus fine. The only lens that won't focus is my little 40mm 2.8 pancake lens. 5Adapter worked after some tweaking on my part When I received this adapter, I was not able to place my Pen-F lenses on it as the fit was way too tight, even with extreme force! I removed the three screws and found that there is a metal spacer ring in this adapter with three bent (spring loaded) tabs. After taking the adapter apart a few times and adjusting these tabs, I was able to get the adapter to eventually fit without being too tight or two loose. This is not a precision instrument by any means, but it works now after some effort.The generic instructions that came with the adapter mentioned that all lenses should be mounted clockwise, with the exception of Nikon lenses, which need to be mounted counter-clockwise. This particular adapter is for a Pen-F lens. It turns out that Pen-F lenses also mount counter clockwise like Nikon lenses, but this is not mentioned in the generic instruction sheet. 4Inexpensive and it works well for manual shooting First off (and this may have been mentioned by others) you will get what you pay for. This is a very inexpensive adapter to allow you to attach your EF-S lenses to a MFT camera body. It's very basic but it works. I use it to attach my Canon EF-S lenses to my Panasonic Lumix G7 camera. I attach the lens first to the adapter following the markings on the adapter and the lens. Once locked in I attach the adapter on to the camera body using the same method. No light leaks and the adapter fits just right. It's not extremely tight to where it's impossible to take off and it's not loose either. To remove the adapter from the body of the camera you need to pull the lever towards the body of the camera and turn the adapter.As mentioned, it's a basic adapter and there are no electronic contacts to have the lens communicate with the body. This means no AF or IS so a tripod would be recommended when zoomed in when using a long lens. This limits its use when using it for video since you'll need to keep your shot as steady as possible. 5Works and fits as expected. See note, however! Lets me use my older M42 threaded lenses with my Panasonic GX85 camera.Do note that certain M42-mount lenses (not designed for specifically for Pentax cameras) may have an extra pin (for locking onto the camera mounting flange) or an overhanging aperture ring that presses against the flange of this adapter and so prevents aperture adjustment! As examples: Early Ricoh lenses have the extra pin and Mamiya-Sekor SX lenses have both the pin and the ring overhang. If all you have is the -extra- pin (not the pin that closes the aperture as that's needed), that may usually be extracted by pulling it out with a vise-grip. (Don't remove the aperture pin!!) If you have a Mamiya-Sekor SX lens that also has the aperture ring overhang, you might be tempted to grind off the overhang but there's a simpler solution: Buy this focusing helicoid instead as it's the same depth as this adapter but is slightly narrower in width so the ring overhang clears the flange surface:https://www.amazon.com/Fotasy-AM42M-Adapter-Focusing-Helicoid/dp/B00E7HRGCC/ref=sr_1_9?ie=UTF8&qid=1509407149&sr=8-9&keywords=fotasy+focusing+helicoidThis item serves dual-purpose as a standard adapter and, as a focusing helicoid, adds macro capability to your lens (bonus!). I'm also using it with an M42 lens that has a frozen focusing helicoid so this adapter restores normal focusing function. 5Minolta/ Sony A mount lens on a Micro 4/5 camera rxtend the life Own quite a few Minolta film AF lenses that are A mount that I use on my Sony SLT a-55 DSLR, now with the Fotasy adapter I extend the use to my Olympus OM-D micro 4/3 camera with the faster 1.4, 1.8 f-stop lenses in manual mode. The lenses mount to the adapter solid and the adapter has a ring that allows some control of the f-stop depth of field in manual mode. Even thou the Minolta/Sony lens have auto-focus, with this adapter the lens is only manual focus which can be used with Olympus focus Peeking to aid in sharp photos. Taking great photos with your vintage lenses has become a whole lot more reasonable price, compared to the more expensive Pro lens minus the ability to autofocus. Long live the life of my great SLR Film lenses. 4Must have for mu-4/3 users! I'm using the adapter with my Panasonic Lumix G10 and Canon FD 50mm f/1.8. I HIGHLY suggest this combo if you own a micro 4/3 camera! It fits snug, feels sturdy, and looks good. The price is right & now I want to run to every thrift store in the area to see what other FD lenses I can find!At first, I had an issue figuring out how to control the aperture on the lens, so I have copied the instructions that I used (originally an Amazon review, copied to mu-43 forum). Hope this helps! If you do this, the lock-open ring on the ADAPTER will control aperture, so just leave the lens itself alone. If you leave the lens on f/22 permanently, you can adjust to whatever you want with the lock-close (on adapter).--------------------------------1. Install adapter ring onto camera: align the red dot on the adapter and red dot on the camera, twist to close.2. Install lens on adapter:2a. Stop the lens down to its smallest aperture.2b. On the adapter, there is a ring that controls the position of a pin that allows for aperture control. Facing the front of the camera, turn the ring to its most counterclockwise position.2c. Seat the lens on the adapter (align the red dots). Now turn the adapter ring to its most clockwise position. This aligns the pin with the lens pin.2d. Twist the lens clockwise until it clicks shut. Now you should be able to rotate the aperture ring and see the aperture adjust. (The ring on the adapter can also be manually rotated, which will adjust the aperture, but fortunately it clicks to a shut position so you won't do it accidentally while shooting).3. Set the camera settings to "Shoot without lens." Otherwise, you'll get an error message about the lens when you press the shutter button.3a. Turn on the GF1, and press the MENU/SET button.3b. Scroll down on the left menu icons to CUSTOM MENU. In the CUSTOM MENU, scroll to the last item, and select SHOOT WITHOUT LENS -> ON.3c. Set the GF1 dial to M-manual or A-aperture priority. 5Fotasy FD/M43 adapters work with zoom lenses! FINALLY --- a Canon FD to M43 adapter that works with zoom lenses!I have four Panasonic M43 cameras and eleven vintage Canon FD lenses I use with them. Focal lengths range from 50mm to 300m, including three zooms: a 28-85mm f/4 FD, a 35-105mm f/3.5 FD, and a 70-210mm f/3.5 Vivitar Series One. The Fotodiox and Metabones adapters have worked well with the prime lenses, but have not worked with the zoom lenses because of flange depth/back focus issues. The problem is most of the adapters made have slightly less overall length than the designed flange depth because some third party lenses will not quite focus to infinity when using an adapter that is on-spec, so they make the adapters a fraction of a millimeter shorter than they should be to insure compatibility. When using prime lenses, this is generally not an issue, but it wreaks havoc when mounting zoom lenses because they are VERY sensitive to flange depth and if the depth is even SLIGHTLY off, you will lose focus when you zoom in and out. I called Metabones about this and they confirmed what I had suspected regarding deliberately off-spec adapters. I decided to see if the Fotasy adapters are any different and they are. These adapters have the specified flange depth and my zoom lenses now stay in focus throughout their zoom range. I checked all three lenses with the Fotasy adapters and a Fuji star chart which is designed to detect back focus issues and they are dead on. I'm switching all of my FD lenses to these Fotasy adapters as I am DELIGHTED with them. If you're encountering similar issues with your legacy zoom lenses on any mirrorless cameras, give these adapters a try. HIGHLY recommended. 5
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Reviews

Customer Reviews

Solid Adapter, works perfectly. This works perfectly. It mounts to a GH5 without any slop or fuss. Locks into place solidly and does not move. It's a little unclear exactly how the "locking" ring works, but you mount the lens to the adapter in the "LOCK" position. Once the lens is locked into place then you rotate the ring to the "OPEN" position and you have full control over the aperture - manually on the lens of course.I'd highly recommend this pass-through adapter rather than a "speed-booster" type, simply because you don't lose any sharpness and you don't introduce any color-shifting or fringing from the additional adapter-lens.You can't go wrong with the price - absolutely no reason to pay more. 5DIY Tilt Shift On the Cheap Truly a great tool if you are experimenting with "free-lensing". This is a technique whereby you detach your lens from your DSLR or mirroless camera and literally attempt focusing off camera with your left hand. While the technique can be easily attempted and maybe mastered in time by anyone, the modifications needed to your camera can be downright frightening and possibly damaging and just not worthwhile.One of the recommended modifications was to drill a hole in the center of your camera's body cap order to attach an accordian or bellows like tube which will connect your lens to your camera body. Since I was not in favor of drilling out perfectly useable body caps to experiment with, I looked for a better solution. The use of a T2 mount (telescope) was suggested as a cheaper and more secure alternative.My setup uses an old Mamya 645 80mm lens is stuck at F2.8 which is mated to a Olympus EPL2 which is a MFT camera. A 2.5" wide piece of 1/8" thick black foam sheet wrapped in two layers around the lens and T2 connector with two 11" black cable ties around the adapter and lens completes the setup. Because of the flexibility of the foam material, the lens is easily able to move horizontally and vertically and emulate those expensive tilt shift lens from Canon and Nikon. If you cannot afford these than this is a cheap way of getting into the medium. The foam sheets are 8"x11" @ 25 cents at Walmart or any other stores. Buy several sheets and give them a try. The T adapter is about 2" high, more than enough length to handle a regular lens. 5Great backup adapter I use this as a backup to my Metabones speed boosters on gh4-gh5. If I'm shooting something on a budget and don't want to rent/buy a Metabones, this adapter does almost the same thing for very little money. You don't get aperture adjustments on EF lenses, but most newer lenses are sharp anyways at f2.8 so it's not a deal breaker. One work around for this I've seen is if you have a Canon body you can set the aperture on the lens and then as you press the depth of field preview button, dismount the lens and the aperture will stay put at whatever you set it on. It's a slow workaround but works fine. Nikon lenses with adapters also work great. Overall a good little backup adapter! 5Works for Canon EF lenses on Blackmagic Pocket I have been using this to connect Canon EF lenses to my Blackmagic pocket camera. Things to know:1) It connects and disconnects without problems or damage.2) The adapter is extremely strong and well-built. Feels sturdy.3) This will not allow you to change aperture on electronic EF lenses. Set it to wide-open on a DSLR and then use ISO and shutter angle to expose properly.4) If you have an EF mount lens with a manual aperture ring, it will work great with this adapter on a Blackmagic pocket camera.5) The crop factor is roughly 3x, so my Tokina 11-16 looks like a 33-48mm (and it looks great!).6) If you have a lens that focuses electronically (not autofocus, just an electronic control), your focus ring won't work. I have many L-series Canon lenses and they all focus fine. The only lens that won't focus is my little 40mm 2.8 pancake lens. 5Adapter worked after some tweaking on my part When I received this adapter, I was not able to place my Pen-F lenses on it as the fit was way too tight, even with extreme force! I removed the three screws and found that there is a metal spacer ring in this adapter with three bent (spring loaded) tabs. After taking the adapter apart a few times and adjusting these tabs, I was able to get the adapter to eventually fit without being too tight or two loose. This is not a precision instrument by any means, but it works now after some effort.The generic instructions that came with the adapter mentioned that all lenses should be mounted clockwise, with the exception of Nikon lenses, which need to be mounted counter-clockwise. This particular adapter is for a Pen-F lens. It turns out that Pen-F lenses also mount counter clockwise like Nikon lenses, but this is not mentioned in the generic instruction sheet. 4Inexpensive and it works well for manual shooting First off (and this may have been mentioned by others) you will get what you pay for. This is a very inexpensive adapter to allow you to attach your EF-S lenses to a MFT camera body. It's very basic but it works. I use it to attach my Canon EF-S lenses to my Panasonic Lumix G7 camera. I attach the lens first to the adapter following the markings on the adapter and the lens. Once locked in I attach the adapter on to the camera body using the same method. No light leaks and the adapter fits just right. It's not extremely tight to where it's impossible to take off and it's not loose either. To remove the adapter from the body of the camera you need to pull the lever towards the body of the camera and turn the adapter.As mentioned, it's a basic adapter and there are no electronic contacts to have the lens communicate with the body. This means no AF or IS so a tripod would be recommended when zoomed in when using a long lens. This limits its use when using it for video since you'll need to keep your shot as steady as possible. 5Works and fits as expected. See note, however! Lets me use my older M42 threaded lenses with my Panasonic GX85 camera.Do note that certain M42-mount lenses (not designed for specifically for Pentax cameras) may have an extra pin (for locking onto the camera mounting flange) or an overhanging aperture ring that presses against the flange of this adapter and so prevents aperture adjustment! As examples: Early Ricoh lenses have the extra pin and Mamiya-Sekor SX lenses have both the pin and the ring overhang. If all you have is the -extra- pin (not the pin that closes the aperture as that's needed), that may usually be extracted by pulling it out with a vise-grip. (Don't remove the aperture pin!!) If you have a Mamiya-Sekor SX lens that also has the aperture ring overhang, you might be tempted to grind off the overhang but there's a simpler solution: Buy this focusing helicoid instead as it's the same depth as this adapter but is slightly narrower in width so the ring overhang clears the flange surface:https://www.amazon.com/Fotasy-AM42M-Adapter-Focusing-Helicoid/dp/B00E7HRGCC/ref=sr_1_9?ie=UTF8&qid=1509407149&sr=8-9&keywords=fotasy+focusing+helicoidThis item serves dual-purpose as a standard adapter and, as a focusing helicoid, adds macro capability to your lens (bonus!). I'm also using it with an M42 lens that has a frozen focusing helicoid so this adapter restores normal focusing function. 5Minolta/ Sony A mount lens on a Micro 4/5 camera rxtend the life Own quite a few Minolta film AF lenses that are A mount that I use on my Sony SLT a-55 DSLR, now with the Fotasy adapter I extend the use to my Olympus OM-D micro 4/3 camera with the faster 1.4, 1.8 f-stop lenses in manual mode. The lenses mount to the adapter solid and the adapter has a ring that allows some control of the f-stop depth of field in manual mode. Even thou the Minolta/Sony lens have auto-focus, with this adapter the lens is only manual focus which can be used with Olympus focus Peeking to aid in sharp photos. Taking great photos with your vintage lenses has become a whole lot more reasonable price, compared to the more expensive Pro lens minus the ability to autofocus. Long live the life of my great SLR Film lenses. 4Must have for mu-4/3 users! I'm using the adapter with my Panasonic Lumix G10 and Canon FD 50mm f/1.8. I HIGHLY suggest this combo if you own a micro 4/3 camera! It fits snug, feels sturdy, and looks good. The price is right & now I want to run to every thrift store in the area to see what other FD lenses I can find!At first, I had an issue figuring out how to control the aperture on the lens, so I have copied the instructions that I used (originally an Amazon review, copied to mu-43 forum). Hope this helps! If you do this, the lock-open ring on the ADAPTER will control aperture, so just leave the lens itself alone. If you leave the lens on f/22 permanently, you can adjust to whatever you want with the lock-close (on adapter).--------------------------------1. Install adapter ring onto camera: align the red dot on the adapter and red dot on the camera, twist to close.2. Install lens on adapter:2a. Stop the lens down to its smallest aperture.2b. On the adapter, there is a ring that controls the position of a pin that allows for aperture control. Facing the front of the camera, turn the ring to its most counterclockwise position.2c. Seat the lens on the adapter (align the red dots). Now turn the adapter ring to its most clockwise position. This aligns the pin with the lens pin.2d. Twist the lens clockwise until it clicks shut. Now you should be able to rotate the aperture ring and see the aperture adjust. (The ring on the adapter can also be manually rotated, which will adjust the aperture, but fortunately it clicks to a shut position so you won't do it accidentally while shooting).3. Set the camera settings to "Shoot without lens." Otherwise, you'll get an error message about the lens when you press the shutter button.3a. Turn on the GF1, and press the MENU/SET button.3b. Scroll down on the left menu icons to CUSTOM MENU. In the CUSTOM MENU, scroll to the last item, and select SHOOT WITHOUT LENS -> ON.3c. Set the GF1 dial to M-manual or A-aperture priority. 5Fotasy FD/M43 adapters work with zoom lenses! FINALLY --- a Canon FD to M43 adapter that works with zoom lenses!I have four Panasonic M43 cameras and eleven vintage Canon FD lenses I use with them. Focal lengths range from 50mm to 300m, including three zooms: a 28-85mm f/4 FD, a 35-105mm f/3.5 FD, and a 70-210mm f/3.5 Vivitar Series One. The Fotodiox and Metabones adapters have worked well with the prime lenses, but have not worked with the zoom lenses because of flange depth/back focus issues. The problem is most of the adapters made have slightly less overall length than the designed flange depth because some third party lenses will not quite focus to infinity when using an adapter that is on-spec, so they make the adapters a fraction of a millimeter shorter than they should be to insure compatibility. When using prime lenses, this is generally not an issue, but it wreaks havoc when mounting zoom lenses because they are VERY sensitive to flange depth and if the depth is even SLIGHTLY off, you will lose focus when you zoom in and out. I called Metabones about this and they confirmed what I had suspected regarding deliberately off-spec adapters. I decided to see if the Fotasy adapters are any different and they are. These adapters have the specified flange depth and my zoom lenses now stay in focus throughout their zoom range. I checked all three lenses with the Fotasy adapters and a Fuji star chart which is designed to detect back focus issues and they are dead on. I'm switching all of my FD lenses to these Fotasy adapters as I am DELIGHTED with them. If you're encountering similar issues with your legacy zoom lenses on any mirrorless cameras, give these adapters a try. HIGHLY recommended. 5
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