• Crescent 19" Nail Puller   56
  • Crescent 19" Nail Puller   56
  • Crescent 19" Nail Puller   56
  • Crescent 19" Nail Puller   56
  • Crescent 19" Nail Puller   56
  • Crescent 19" Nail Puller   56
  • Crescent 19" Nail Puller   56
  • Crescent 19" Nail Puller   56
Crescent 19" Nail Puller   56
Crescent 19" Nail Puller   56
Crescent 19" Nail Puller   56
Crescent 19" Nail Puller   56
Crescent 19" Nail Puller   56
Crescent 19" Nail Puller   56
Crescent 19" Nail Puller   56
Crescent 19" Nail Puller   56

Crescent 19" Nail Puller 56

Sale price
MRP: €87,00
Regular price
€144,00
Unit price
per 
( 39% off )
Quantity:
Expected Delivery: 21-28 days
Import Duties to be borne by the customer at the time of delivery.
Product price is exclusive of such duties.

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10 Days Return

Tracked Shipping

Secure Payments

10 Days Return

  • Box-joint, forged alloy, Hardened and tempered jaw
  • 18-Inch overall length
  • Black Enamel finish

Customer Reviews

Works better than Wonderbar or bar nail puller any day. VERY glad I got this for Pallet tear down I recycle pallets quite a bit. I have a deconstruction bar, wonder bars, hammers, air punch, sawzall, etc. I am pretty good at knocking apart a pallet quickly then pulling nails out. I don't care to cut them off and leave parts in the wood or cut the ends that are nailed together. Wastes too much good, usable length of the boards. However, some pallets have staples, or twisted nails that hold tightly and the heads will break off long before I can get the nail to pull out. Unfortunately, this generally results in having to either cut it off and leave it or bend it over and nail it back down. This tool lets me get a good, solid grip on the nail, even if the head has broken off and with the leverage foot pulls out the longest nails like they are sunk in butter. This has made clean recycling of pallets and other deconstruction so much easier. Glad I bought it. 5I want to grab metal and pull it out, That is what this tool has done for me over, and over and over. I use a lot of reclaimed wood that others often throw out. I also re-use wood multiple times over the years around my workshop, when making or repairing stuff. This includes throwing together a lot of temporary jigs and holders.I also screw up a lot, so there is no end to my need to pull out big nails, little nails, air gun brads, staples, and broken pieces etc., you probably know the drill. So, maybe like me, you use pry bars, thin and thick, screw divers, claw hammers, needle nose pliers, vice-grips etc. I often try to get a piece of scrap wood under the tool I am working with and even resort to trying to get another tool under the tool I am trying to work with. Insane, right?I don t know about you, but I have wasted hours doing all of this, that is, until I found this tool!One thing that is important to point out, I originally saw it in a big box store, but wanted to check out Amazon reviews before buying. I found a mix on this tool, but ordered it anyway.When it arrived, I marveled at the seeming quality and weightiness as I looked at it. Then I felt sick and had buyer s remorse. The tips of the pliers looked out of whack, like quality control was not part of it s manufacture. I returned it to Amazon and got a replacement. Guess what? Same thing!However, I have used the tool repeatedly and found my initial reaction had nothing to do with this tool s stellar performance. In fact what I considers some off machining (seeing that the two faces did not meet properly ) I have come to realize that my concern has nothing to do with the tool s stellar performance. After all I want to grab metal and pull it out, That is what this tool has done for me over, and over and over.I keep this tool on my tool rack just above my workbench and use it routinely, without any frustration or disappointment. I wish I found this tool years ago, and if I find any friend telling me they have similar problems to what this tool does, I would recommend it without exception, even given my initial concerns and reactions. Hope this helps. 5Works. .. So I got this to get the rusted nails from the pallet wood. The problem I had removing the nails was that the nail heads would give in very easily and could not use a regular hammer's nail puller side as it just popped the nail head off and the nail remained inside. This tool does the job. Some elbow grease is required though. 5Works well on sunk-in nails--once you get the hang of it! When I received this tool the paint was already coming off, so I was concerned about the workmanship. Hopefully it won't rust as it's not exactly a inexpensive tool. However, it did work well for me in removing sheets of plywood from an interior wall (with most nails sunken in.) Before finding this tool I was doing a lot more damage to the plywood. Once I got the hang of using it, this tool helps limit the damage to the area around the nail head. Someone recommended a cats paw tool--which worked (for me) on nails that were not beneath the surface. But this nail-puller did better to dig out nails and also worked on smaller head finishing/paneling nails. Overall, I do like this tool though I think it could be updated from it's 'vintage' design. Be sure to watch a YouTube video about using this 'slide hammer nail puller.' If your hand is in the wrong place on the tool you could really hurt yourself! 4Buy it! Even for small jobs it s worth it! I don t expect to have a frequent need for these but when you need them there is no substitute. I wrestled with getting finish nails out of my 1 thick trim. Got several out with much effort using pliers & a claw hammer but there were loads I could not budge. These pliers were delivered & 5 min later I have a pile of nails & rescued trim. I m a middle aged avg sized woman with bad shoulders & other joint shortcomings & these made it so easy. Fun almost. I sometimes run into tools that are uncomfortable for smaller hands, that s not an issue. These don t open wide b/c they don t need to so they don t flop around like some pliers. I was worried the head would be too bulky to get a grip on the fine nails in my trim (18 gauge maybe?) nope no problem. I was worried the long handle would be cumbersome but it s that leverage that makes it easy. The grip is comfortable enough but the tool makes it so easy that I m not sure I d notice. Get it! I looked at these at least twice before deciding. Figured there d be another solution. Shoulda bought them & saved myself time. 5Cheap knockoff can't do the job Junk knockoff1) the entire tool, including the jaws, is apparently cast and not forged.2) the jaws deform and become useless immediately when used on ordinary steel nails3) the cheap paint comes off immediately on any wear or solid contact, including the tool's own moving parts. 2Works awesome - closest thing to magic there could be. I use this nail puller with the "studball" magnet ball to find the nails I need to pull. I'm taking down old drywall with nails of varying size. Within ten minutes I was able to use this nail puller to get magnificent results removing nails without cracking or smashing the drywall and making a big mess, exactly like I saw this one carpenter dude on YouTube showing. This tool gouges just enough of the wall to fit its teeth down onto the nail heads - or body if no head. In old, softened drywall it's almost like picking pins out of butter.This nail puller can be hard to use for nails right up against a ceiling corner or floor corner, but nothing in life is perfect.This nail puller seems to be built using exactly the same materials and technique (mold, I believe) they probably used half a century ago, and I assume its lifespan will justify that decision. 5This tool is excellent! A must-have for demo and remodeling work to prevent wood damage and to help you save time. I bought these to use in tearing down an old house. The house was full of old ship-lap lumber in the walls, teardrop wood siding, tongue and groove ceilings and floors, etc. that I am using in my house remodel. What isn't used will be sold for reclaimed wood to other folks with similar projects. This kind of aged lumber is valuable, but anyone that's ever gutted an old house knows how difficult it can be to get the wood out without tearing it all to pieces. A cats paw-type pry bar and framing hammer is what I was using at first. That leaves gouges in the wood, is more likely to chip out, and is not very fast.With these specialty pliers I can pull down a board and have all of the nails out in a couple of minutes, with much less damage to the wood than with any other tool I've tried. They just work. If any part of the nail is sticking out 1/16" of an inch or so, it's coming out. It does a much better job and can get to nails that a framing hammer or even a thin pry bar can't. And it doesn't mar the wood nearly as much either. You still have some tear-out around some of the nail holes, but that is to be expected with nails and wood that have been in place for 80+ years. It's less tear-out than with the other tools I was using. These pliers paid for themselves in the first 10 minutes in just the lumber saved and cut the time in half of pulling and de-nailing a board. 5100+ year old tool design that is still useful, but very clumsy. There are better options available that are made in US. Advertised as made in the USA. When it got to my house it had "Made in Taiwan" cast into the handle. That sucks.This is one clumsy tool to get used to. It has its uses though for getting to a dug-in nail head, and to pull out bigger, really stubborn nails. I use the more modern Crescent nail pulling pliers (NP-11 I think). They work better and I use them more often than this wobbly, made in Taiwan, finger smashing antique. 2... old ones similar to this and they were certainly better build First time i used it it pulled out about 15-20+ nails before a piece of the tip chipped right off second time i used it again thinking it was operator error i made sure everything was lined up and even it still chipped another piece so i just returned it i have used old ones similar to this and they were certainly better build quality 1
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Reviews

Customer Reviews

Works better than Wonderbar or bar nail puller any day. VERY glad I got this for Pallet tear down I recycle pallets quite a bit. I have a deconstruction bar, wonder bars, hammers, air punch, sawzall, etc. I am pretty good at knocking apart a pallet quickly then pulling nails out. I don't care to cut them off and leave parts in the wood or cut the ends that are nailed together. Wastes too much good, usable length of the boards. However, some pallets have staples, or twisted nails that hold tightly and the heads will break off long before I can get the nail to pull out. Unfortunately, this generally results in having to either cut it off and leave it or bend it over and nail it back down. This tool lets me get a good, solid grip on the nail, even if the head has broken off and with the leverage foot pulls out the longest nails like they are sunk in butter. This has made clean recycling of pallets and other deconstruction so much easier. Glad I bought it. 5I want to grab metal and pull it out, That is what this tool has done for me over, and over and over. I use a lot of reclaimed wood that others often throw out. I also re-use wood multiple times over the years around my workshop, when making or repairing stuff. This includes throwing together a lot of temporary jigs and holders.I also screw up a lot, so there is no end to my need to pull out big nails, little nails, air gun brads, staples, and broken pieces etc., you probably know the drill. So, maybe like me, you use pry bars, thin and thick, screw divers, claw hammers, needle nose pliers, vice-grips etc. I often try to get a piece of scrap wood under the tool I am working with and even resort to trying to get another tool under the tool I am trying to work with. Insane, right?I don t know about you, but I have wasted hours doing all of this, that is, until I found this tool!One thing that is important to point out, I originally saw it in a big box store, but wanted to check out Amazon reviews before buying. I found a mix on this tool, but ordered it anyway.When it arrived, I marveled at the seeming quality and weightiness as I looked at it. Then I felt sick and had buyer s remorse. The tips of the pliers looked out of whack, like quality control was not part of it s manufacture. I returned it to Amazon and got a replacement. Guess what? Same thing!However, I have used the tool repeatedly and found my initial reaction had nothing to do with this tool s stellar performance. In fact what I considers some off machining (seeing that the two faces did not meet properly ) I have come to realize that my concern has nothing to do with the tool s stellar performance. After all I want to grab metal and pull it out, That is what this tool has done for me over, and over and over.I keep this tool on my tool rack just above my workbench and use it routinely, without any frustration or disappointment. I wish I found this tool years ago, and if I find any friend telling me they have similar problems to what this tool does, I would recommend it without exception, even given my initial concerns and reactions. Hope this helps. 5Works. .. So I got this to get the rusted nails from the pallet wood. The problem I had removing the nails was that the nail heads would give in very easily and could not use a regular hammer's nail puller side as it just popped the nail head off and the nail remained inside. This tool does the job. Some elbow grease is required though. 5Works well on sunk-in nails--once you get the hang of it! When I received this tool the paint was already coming off, so I was concerned about the workmanship. Hopefully it won't rust as it's not exactly a inexpensive tool. However, it did work well for me in removing sheets of plywood from an interior wall (with most nails sunken in.) Before finding this tool I was doing a lot more damage to the plywood. Once I got the hang of using it, this tool helps limit the damage to the area around the nail head. Someone recommended a cats paw tool--which worked (for me) on nails that were not beneath the surface. But this nail-puller did better to dig out nails and also worked on smaller head finishing/paneling nails. Overall, I do like this tool though I think it could be updated from it's 'vintage' design. Be sure to watch a YouTube video about using this 'slide hammer nail puller.' If your hand is in the wrong place on the tool you could really hurt yourself! 4Buy it! Even for small jobs it s worth it! I don t expect to have a frequent need for these but when you need them there is no substitute. I wrestled with getting finish nails out of my 1 thick trim. Got several out with much effort using pliers & a claw hammer but there were loads I could not budge. These pliers were delivered & 5 min later I have a pile of nails & rescued trim. I m a middle aged avg sized woman with bad shoulders & other joint shortcomings & these made it so easy. Fun almost. I sometimes run into tools that are uncomfortable for smaller hands, that s not an issue. These don t open wide b/c they don t need to so they don t flop around like some pliers. I was worried the head would be too bulky to get a grip on the fine nails in my trim (18 gauge maybe?) nope no problem. I was worried the long handle would be cumbersome but it s that leverage that makes it easy. The grip is comfortable enough but the tool makes it so easy that I m not sure I d notice. Get it! I looked at these at least twice before deciding. Figured there d be another solution. Shoulda bought them & saved myself time. 5Cheap knockoff can't do the job Junk knockoff1) the entire tool, including the jaws, is apparently cast and not forged.2) the jaws deform and become useless immediately when used on ordinary steel nails3) the cheap paint comes off immediately on any wear or solid contact, including the tool's own moving parts. 2Works awesome - closest thing to magic there could be. I use this nail puller with the "studball" magnet ball to find the nails I need to pull. I'm taking down old drywall with nails of varying size. Within ten minutes I was able to use this nail puller to get magnificent results removing nails without cracking or smashing the drywall and making a big mess, exactly like I saw this one carpenter dude on YouTube showing. This tool gouges just enough of the wall to fit its teeth down onto the nail heads - or body if no head. In old, softened drywall it's almost like picking pins out of butter.This nail puller can be hard to use for nails right up against a ceiling corner or floor corner, but nothing in life is perfect.This nail puller seems to be built using exactly the same materials and technique (mold, I believe) they probably used half a century ago, and I assume its lifespan will justify that decision. 5This tool is excellent! A must-have for demo and remodeling work to prevent wood damage and to help you save time. I bought these to use in tearing down an old house. The house was full of old ship-lap lumber in the walls, teardrop wood siding, tongue and groove ceilings and floors, etc. that I am using in my house remodel. What isn't used will be sold for reclaimed wood to other folks with similar projects. This kind of aged lumber is valuable, but anyone that's ever gutted an old house knows how difficult it can be to get the wood out without tearing it all to pieces. A cats paw-type pry bar and framing hammer is what I was using at first. That leaves gouges in the wood, is more likely to chip out, and is not very fast.With these specialty pliers I can pull down a board and have all of the nails out in a couple of minutes, with much less damage to the wood than with any other tool I've tried. They just work. If any part of the nail is sticking out 1/16" of an inch or so, it's coming out. It does a much better job and can get to nails that a framing hammer or even a thin pry bar can't. And it doesn't mar the wood nearly as much either. You still have some tear-out around some of the nail holes, but that is to be expected with nails and wood that have been in place for 80+ years. It's less tear-out than with the other tools I was using. These pliers paid for themselves in the first 10 minutes in just the lumber saved and cut the time in half of pulling and de-nailing a board. 5100+ year old tool design that is still useful, but very clumsy. There are better options available that are made in US. Advertised as made in the USA. When it got to my house it had "Made in Taiwan" cast into the handle. That sucks.This is one clumsy tool to get used to. It has its uses though for getting to a dug-in nail head, and to pull out bigger, really stubborn nails. I use the more modern Crescent nail pulling pliers (NP-11 I think). They work better and I use them more often than this wobbly, made in Taiwan, finger smashing antique. 2... old ones similar to this and they were certainly better build First time i used it it pulled out about 15-20+ nails before a piece of the tip chipped right off second time i used it again thinking it was operator error i made sure everything was lined up and even it still chipped another piece so i just returned it i have used old ones similar to this and they were certainly better build quality 1
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