• Celestron 71336 Nature DX 12x56 Binocular (Green)
  • Celestron 71336 Nature DX 12x56 Binocular (Green)
  • Celestron 71336 Nature DX 12x56 Binocular (Green)
  • Celestron 71336 Nature DX 12x56 Binocular (Green)
  • Celestron 71336 Nature DX 12x56 Binocular (Green)
  • Celestron 71336 Nature DX 12x56 Binocular (Green)
  • Celestron 71336 Nature DX 12x56 Binocular (Green)
  • Celestron 71336 Nature DX 12x56 Binocular (Green)
  • Celestron 71336 Nature DX 12x56 Binocular (Green)
Celestron 71336 Nature DX 12x56 Binocular (Green)
Celestron 71336 Nature DX 12x56 Binocular (Green)
Celestron 71336 Nature DX 12x56 Binocular (Green)
Celestron 71336 Nature DX 12x56 Binocular (Green)
Celestron 71336 Nature DX 12x56 Binocular (Green)
Celestron 71336 Nature DX 12x56 Binocular (Green)
Celestron 71336 Nature DX 12x56 Binocular (Green)
Celestron 71336 Nature DX 12x56 Binocular (Green)
Celestron 71336 Nature DX 12x56 Binocular (Green)

Celestron 71336 Nature DX 12x56 Binocular (Green)

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MRP: €538,00
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€896,00
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  • Designed with the outdoor enthusiast in mind, waterproof and fully rubber armored
  • Phase coated BaK-4 prisms for increased contrast and resolution
  • Fully multi-coated optics provide brighter images by increasing light transmission through the entire optical path
  • Close focus of 9.8 feet for viewing nearby subjects
  • Sturdy, twist-up eyecups with multiple stops. Eyeglass friendly with 16 mm of eye relief

Customer Reviews

Outstanding value with comparable quality to binoculars twice the price I just ordered a second pair of the Nature DX 8x32. I had purchased this along with Wirecutter's recommended TrailSeeker 8x42 to compare. While the TrailSeeker had a nice carrying case and accessories, I just couldn't see a big enough difference to justify the more than twice the price to upgrade for what was supposed to be more light and larger field of view. Both were great, but the Nature DX 8x32 is an outstanding value. So much so that I've ordered a second for our trip to the Grand Tetons. 5Best In Class for 8x42's IMO Haven't used them much yet, but they appear to be a quality build with great optics and eye relief. The close focus is awesome with good FOV. They are great all around nocs with emphasis on nature. But also do pretty good for stargazing with the fully multi-coated lenses. They also serve well for general purpose use because they are fairly light, and manageable in size. Plus they are water/fogproof, so they'll be fine if you slip up and leave them out overnight, drop them in water...or spill your drink on them! You will not find a better pair of binoculars in this class. They also came very well packed for shipping which is also a plus.P.S. I've attached a pic with these beside a pair of 10x50's for size comparison. In case your on the fence about this, it's something to consider. 8x42's are lighter, more manageable, steadier, and much more comfortable for carrying around with a neck strap for any period of time. 5Finally found what I was looking for! Love the Nature DX 8x42! These have turned out to be my favorite pair of binoculars. The view is really nice, they fit very well into my hands, the focus is buttery smooth, and they seem really well made.I was on the search for the best 8x42 I could find in my price range for bird watching and nature viewing, and in the process I've tried quite a few different brands/models. I did tons of research, reading every review, test, and recommendation I could find. My budget was up to $400, but I still tried more expensive binoculars just to have a good basis for comparison. The above-budget binoculars I tried were Vortex Viper, Vortex Razor, and Zeiss Conquest HD. Again, those were just for comparison and "benchmarking". These were tried in a store only, but it was a large store with many bright and also shadowed areas... plus lots of "stuffed" wildlife mounted high on the walls (deer, etc.).The following binoculars were compared outdoors, I had each pair of these for one to two weeks, so I had time to do very thorough comparisons in many different lighting situations. Included were: Vanguard Spirit ED, Olympus Magellan EXWP I, Carson HD, Celestron TrailSeeker, and Atlas Intrepid ED. I also had/have some other sizes for comparison... Sightron Blue Sky II, 8x32 Alpen Apex 8x32, Alpen Shasta Ridge 10x42, Atlas Intrepid ED 7x36, and Kenko UltraView 10x42.I have used many other pairs of binoculars for my other hobby, stargazing. Many of you already know that stargazing is very demanding on binoculars in terms of brightness, edge distortion, and resolution. I only mention this to show a bit more of my background, as some binoculars that are great for astronomy aren't the best for daytime... and vice-versa. These 8x42's were going to be strictly daytime use for me, so only casual testing at night was performed to get a better idea of resolution, brightness, and edge performance.Ok, one of the BIG things I learned from all of this is that YOU have to try any prospective binoculars yourself. Just because an expert reviewer says a certain pair are fantastic doesn't mean they'll be fantastic for you. Everyone's eyes, face shape (which can affect required eye relief), priorities, etc. are different. The other big thing, for me anyways, is that resolution is king. It doesn't matter how great the edge performance is, or how bright the binocular is, or how much depth of field there is if what you're viewing won't come into sharp focus. I thought my Olympus Magellans were sharp and was totally happy with them, but after experiencing a bit more sharpness I can hardly stand using them. Those are considered really nice binoculars, especially in their "day". Now, saying that, the Celestron Nature DX were not the sharpest binoculars I tested when performing strictly resolution testing (using fine print, barcodes, etc. at close and far distances). They were very close compared to the sharpest of the group, though, and I doubt most people would notice any difference. However, in real usage, they're as sharp as any of the others and I couldn't notice a difference at all.To cut to the chase, the Nature DX's were the only binoculars that really made me smile every time I used them. My eyes just seemed to effortlessly relax into the image. I would take several binoculars into the field at the same time, viewing everything from birds to pinecones, to clouds, to airplanes, to people. Each time, when I looked through the Nature DX's, I found myself actually enjoying the image, instead of just focusing on how well it looked from an analytical perspective. Every other binocular I spent the whole time adjusting focus and diopter settings, trying to get that little bit more of "great" view. Then I'd try the Nature DX's again... and again I'd sink into the image, being amazed by that Acorn Woodpecker and actually intently watching what he was doing, forgetting that I was testing all these different binoculars. THAT is what a great pair of binoculars for YOU will do... you'll feel like you're actually there, instead of just viewing from afar. Solely scientific testing won't determine the best for you. Like I mentioned, at first I wanted a bit more resolution, but found that in real world use they had just as much resolution as any of the others, even the ED models. They do everything very well, it just all comes together with these. Plus you can't beat the price. I was happily willing to spend the full $400 of my budget if I needed to, and to be quite honest if these were $400 I would've paid it, I absolutely love them. To top it off, they're very compact and lightweight, about the size of most other 8x32's. I'd buy another pair in a heartbeat if mine were ever lost.Just for your info, I'm really happy with my Alpen Shasta Ridge 10x42. Fantastic resolution, great feel, and a great price (got them on sale for $99). Close runner ups for me after all this testing were the Atlas Intrepid ED 8x42 (very nice view and resolution, just a tad too long for me, plus I've found out I like the top hinge vs. the Atlas' open hinge design), the Atlas Intrepid ED 7x36, and the Celestron TrailSeeker (which are very close to the Nature DX... a tad bit sharper, but my eyes didn't sink into the image as much as they did with the Nature DX).So, out of all of the ones I tested, the Nature DX 8x42 and the Alpen 10x42 are the ones I kept... not because of their lower prices, but because they were the ones that I really enjoyed using.I hope this helps some of you! 5Exceeds my expectations! Celestron has not failed to impress me! I began shopping for binoculars a few months before my purchase. I wanted binoculars that would be useful in kayaking as well as for astronomy.My first criteria was picking out the size. Binoculars have two main specs you will want to use for this. The first is the magnification and the second is the objective lens size. These are 8X42 so you have 42mm objective lens and the binoculars magnify the image 8X. You should also realize that not only the image is magnified but also any motion, bumps, waves, bounces etc. You can always mount binoculars to a tripod for astronomy but this would not be very practical on the water. Normally people might want a large magnification for astronomy but smaller magnifications will reveal a larger swath of the sky in your view and the image will also appear brighter. 8X seemed like the best compromise for both hobbies and 42mm seemed adequate for astronomy as well as kayaking. Another very important option from my experience in astronomy is the dew and moisture that you will encounter. These binoculars are nitrogen purged and water resistant. This will be sufficient for the occasional splash of water (possibly even a dunking but I don't want to test that out) and the dew that forms as the nights get cold.I finally got a chance to take them out on the water at Lake Wickaboag in West Warren Massachusetts. The day was unfortunately windy and the water choppy. These binoculars luckily come with attached lens rubber lens covers. They got a work out as I paddled out and where covered with splash marks but the eyepieces where nice and dry whenever I opened them up. The one issue I do have is the objective covers are held on by a small strap and at the end of the day I was missing one until I found it under the seat of my kayak as it had slipped off the end of the binoculars. I had originally thought the motion of the kayak and bouncing around would not be too noticeable with just 8X binoculars. It took some getting used to. I found I could minimize the rocking and steady myself a bit if I hunched down low (low center of gravity) and pressed my back against the seat. This made for steadier viewing. It is disconcerting being jostled and trying to view a still object on land when the bouncing is magnified. 8X seems to be perfect for use on a small craft. These binoculars brought in objects I could not or could just barely see with the unaided eye. Distant radio towers, a jetski being put in the water across the lake, individual feathers on an egret around 50' distant where all crystal clear in the view!I haven't spent as much time with these on the night sky as I have using these during the day. But all you have to do is point these straight up, focus on a bright star and you can't help but be impressed. Where you might only see small handful of stars it will look as if someone spilled salt in the sky as you will see many many times more stars! My first big test was to locate the Andromeda galaxy. Cassiopeia is easily visible from my site and it pointed me in the right direction. It took around four minutes to locate Andromeda. Some nebulosity was clearly visible with these little 8X42's! The Pleiades area also a site to see that look great in these binoculars. I did attempt to resolve the double star Mizar and was not able to resolve it as being a double. Perhaps if I mounted the binoculars as even small 8X42's seemed to bounce around a bit more than I'd like. I found it easiest to hold the binoculars snugly in the palms of both hands instead of using my fingers.The focusing is extremely easy to use and has a nice buttery feel to it. Setting up these binoculars is a fairly easy process. The left hand has its own focusing to account for any differences in your eye. Cover up the left hand objective (using the lenscap) and then focus it so that the view appears clear in your right hand eye using the main focus on the top. Next, swap the lens cover to the other side and use the small fine focus for your left eye. The last step is to insure that both your eyes are looking straight thru by widening the binoculars as needed. Once everything is perfectly in focus and you are looking straight thru you will see that objects up to several hundred yards now `pop' in and appear dimensional.As I mentioned earlier, I researched binoculars for a couple of months before making this purchase and was NOT disappointed. I was leaning towards a pair of Bushnell Legacy WP 8 x 42 Binocular Size: 8x42 due to the great reviews and similar specs. What pushed me back towards Celestron was how impressed I was with the Celestron 52268 C90 Mak Spotting scope (Black), Celestrons website with the compare option and of course Celestrons limited lifetime warranty! Any company that can offer this kind of warranty and still make a profit has to have a good & reliable product! 5Outstanding!! Just coming off safari. Outstanding binoculars. I took some iPhone photos through one side of the binos. A little crude but effective. 5Great Binos--Great Price This item showed up in a review article in "The Living Bird" published by the Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology.as the best binoculars available in the "bargain price range" in a review of several brands. I've had a Celestron spotting scope for 40 years, and never been disappointed with it. I wanted to replace my ageing binoculars, and Amazon's price for these was unbeatable--even a greater bargain than suggested by the Cornell Lab review. The review was correct. The images are the usual Celestron quality. The binoculars are relatively light-weight, the field of focus is excellent, especially for bird-watching, the adjustments are easily accomplished, and the lens covers and case are very utilitarian. An excellent product at a bargain price. 5Inexpensive for good quality Recommended at one point by Cornell Ornithology as one of the best economy binoculars, and I agree. They're not as good as the $1,300 pair that blew my mind when I borrowed them from some professional naturalist on some beach walk, but they are way better than the cheap ones that I have gotten year after year for decades. I finally decided to buy a decent pair. Fairly good close focus (good for birds that are only 7 or 8 feet away, whn you want to see every feather), sturdy and seem unlikely to break, not too heavy, easy to use, the lens caps can be set up so that they can be taken off without them automatically falling to the ground. Very good step up if you are tired of cheap binoculars, but you are still an "economy minded" person like me. 5Outstanding image for price This is my first pair of binoculars for birding, and I chose them based on a list published by the National Audubon Society; these were the highest rated bins in the get in the game category.First off, they don t feel too heavy in the hand, and they have a nice rubber coating all around which make them really comfortable to hold. However, the included neck strap isn t so great since the edges are kinda scratchy.The image quality is excellent, especially for the price. At 8x magnification, you re obviously not going to get a great image when looking at a kite from 100 yards away, but anything reasonably close looks amazing. The color is true, and the field of view is pretty wide. And here s something that really sets these apart from a less expensive model also by Celestron that I bought for my son: these are really, really good at close focus. I m able to view objects (and birds like common paraques that often sleep near trails) at just 5 feet away. I can see every detail in a paraque s plumage, for example, that I simply cannot achieve with the less expensive model.The eye relief afforded by this model is good, too, and the twist telescopic eye cup feels nice and sturdy, another major difference between this and the cheaper model. 5BEST VALUE FOR MONEY EVALUATED BY Phd ECOLOGIST After evaluating a lot of 8X42s this turns out the best value for money. Spending a lot of time with really great birders, I always have the feeling, that many of them want to have a Leica or Zeiss for the prestige. When I ask them their opinion on these Celestrons, they look at me with some hidden comtempt......... After all, I am not a real birder, but just a professional ecologist......... in spite of my PhD and 5 decades in the field: NOT A BIRDER!. And they are right. However, my vision is still 20-20. And you know what? I just don't see all that much difference between those $2000+ binoculars and these $125! I once had a real Leica 8X42 and I lost it...... I felt so bad. Now, if something happens to these Celestrons, I just smile and think, glad they were not Leicas. Folks, I tested more than 20 different under $200 brands, and these represent the best value for money. Don't hesitate to buy these. And if you travel to a developing country, donate them to a park ranger! those guys rarely have decent equipment and the protect nature under very difficult conditions. 5Not bad not great Was not as nice as I was expecting from the description or reviews. Don t get me wrong, they are not horrible. However they are not a 5 Star item. I ordered them as an upgrade to my Leupold Yosemite Porto Prism 8x30 binoculars. Going from 30mm to 42mm I expected improvements in low light. How ever my Leupolds did just as well if not better. Also if you have a large head like myself you might find these hard to adjust for your eye spacing. I should have know at the price point they wouldn t live up to my expectations. How re these have so many reviews claiming they are a steal and have the build quality of a much more expensive pair. If it shoulda to good to be true.....I will stick with my Luepolds and save up for something else. I recommend if your looking for a great pair of binoculars trying them out in a store. If you don t have a lot to spend and want some decent birding binoculars I would recommend these if they are all you can afford. 3
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Reviews

Customer Reviews

Outstanding value with comparable quality to binoculars twice the price I just ordered a second pair of the Nature DX 8x32. I had purchased this along with Wirecutter's recommended TrailSeeker 8x42 to compare. While the TrailSeeker had a nice carrying case and accessories, I just couldn't see a big enough difference to justify the more than twice the price to upgrade for what was supposed to be more light and larger field of view. Both were great, but the Nature DX 8x32 is an outstanding value. So much so that I've ordered a second for our trip to the Grand Tetons. 5Best In Class for 8x42's IMO Haven't used them much yet, but they appear to be a quality build with great optics and eye relief. The close focus is awesome with good FOV. They are great all around nocs with emphasis on nature. But also do pretty good for stargazing with the fully multi-coated lenses. They also serve well for general purpose use because they are fairly light, and manageable in size. Plus they are water/fogproof, so they'll be fine if you slip up and leave them out overnight, drop them in water...or spill your drink on them! You will not find a better pair of binoculars in this class. They also came very well packed for shipping which is also a plus.P.S. I've attached a pic with these beside a pair of 10x50's for size comparison. In case your on the fence about this, it's something to consider. 8x42's are lighter, more manageable, steadier, and much more comfortable for carrying around with a neck strap for any period of time. 5Finally found what I was looking for! Love the Nature DX 8x42! These have turned out to be my favorite pair of binoculars. The view is really nice, they fit very well into my hands, the focus is buttery smooth, and they seem really well made.I was on the search for the best 8x42 I could find in my price range for bird watching and nature viewing, and in the process I've tried quite a few different brands/models. I did tons of research, reading every review, test, and recommendation I could find. My budget was up to $400, but I still tried more expensive binoculars just to have a good basis for comparison. The above-budget binoculars I tried were Vortex Viper, Vortex Razor, and Zeiss Conquest HD. Again, those were just for comparison and "benchmarking". These were tried in a store only, but it was a large store with many bright and also shadowed areas... plus lots of "stuffed" wildlife mounted high on the walls (deer, etc.).The following binoculars were compared outdoors, I had each pair of these for one to two weeks, so I had time to do very thorough comparisons in many different lighting situations. Included were: Vanguard Spirit ED, Olympus Magellan EXWP I, Carson HD, Celestron TrailSeeker, and Atlas Intrepid ED. I also had/have some other sizes for comparison... Sightron Blue Sky II, 8x32 Alpen Apex 8x32, Alpen Shasta Ridge 10x42, Atlas Intrepid ED 7x36, and Kenko UltraView 10x42.I have used many other pairs of binoculars for my other hobby, stargazing. Many of you already know that stargazing is very demanding on binoculars in terms of brightness, edge distortion, and resolution. I only mention this to show a bit more of my background, as some binoculars that are great for astronomy aren't the best for daytime... and vice-versa. These 8x42's were going to be strictly daytime use for me, so only casual testing at night was performed to get a better idea of resolution, brightness, and edge performance.Ok, one of the BIG things I learned from all of this is that YOU have to try any prospective binoculars yourself. Just because an expert reviewer says a certain pair are fantastic doesn't mean they'll be fantastic for you. Everyone's eyes, face shape (which can affect required eye relief), priorities, etc. are different. The other big thing, for me anyways, is that resolution is king. It doesn't matter how great the edge performance is, or how bright the binocular is, or how much depth of field there is if what you're viewing won't come into sharp focus. I thought my Olympus Magellans were sharp and was totally happy with them, but after experiencing a bit more sharpness I can hardly stand using them. Those are considered really nice binoculars, especially in their "day". Now, saying that, the Celestron Nature DX were not the sharpest binoculars I tested when performing strictly resolution testing (using fine print, barcodes, etc. at close and far distances). They were very close compared to the sharpest of the group, though, and I doubt most people would notice any difference. However, in real usage, they're as sharp as any of the others and I couldn't notice a difference at all.To cut to the chase, the Nature DX's were the only binoculars that really made me smile every time I used them. My eyes just seemed to effortlessly relax into the image. I would take several binoculars into the field at the same time, viewing everything from birds to pinecones, to clouds, to airplanes, to people. Each time, when I looked through the Nature DX's, I found myself actually enjoying the image, instead of just focusing on how well it looked from an analytical perspective. Every other binocular I spent the whole time adjusting focus and diopter settings, trying to get that little bit more of "great" view. Then I'd try the Nature DX's again... and again I'd sink into the image, being amazed by that Acorn Woodpecker and actually intently watching what he was doing, forgetting that I was testing all these different binoculars. THAT is what a great pair of binoculars for YOU will do... you'll feel like you're actually there, instead of just viewing from afar. Solely scientific testing won't determine the best for you. Like I mentioned, at first I wanted a bit more resolution, but found that in real world use they had just as much resolution as any of the others, even the ED models. They do everything very well, it just all comes together with these. Plus you can't beat the price. I was happily willing to spend the full $400 of my budget if I needed to, and to be quite honest if these were $400 I would've paid it, I absolutely love them. To top it off, they're very compact and lightweight, about the size of most other 8x32's. I'd buy another pair in a heartbeat if mine were ever lost.Just for your info, I'm really happy with my Alpen Shasta Ridge 10x42. Fantastic resolution, great feel, and a great price (got them on sale for $99). Close runner ups for me after all this testing were the Atlas Intrepid ED 8x42 (very nice view and resolution, just a tad too long for me, plus I've found out I like the top hinge vs. the Atlas' open hinge design), the Atlas Intrepid ED 7x36, and the Celestron TrailSeeker (which are very close to the Nature DX... a tad bit sharper, but my eyes didn't sink into the image as much as they did with the Nature DX).So, out of all of the ones I tested, the Nature DX 8x42 and the Alpen 10x42 are the ones I kept... not because of their lower prices, but because they were the ones that I really enjoyed using.I hope this helps some of you! 5Exceeds my expectations! Celestron has not failed to impress me! I began shopping for binoculars a few months before my purchase. I wanted binoculars that would be useful in kayaking as well as for astronomy.My first criteria was picking out the size. Binoculars have two main specs you will want to use for this. The first is the magnification and the second is the objective lens size. These are 8X42 so you have 42mm objective lens and the binoculars magnify the image 8X. You should also realize that not only the image is magnified but also any motion, bumps, waves, bounces etc. You can always mount binoculars to a tripod for astronomy but this would not be very practical on the water. Normally people might want a large magnification for astronomy but smaller magnifications will reveal a larger swath of the sky in your view and the image will also appear brighter. 8X seemed like the best compromise for both hobbies and 42mm seemed adequate for astronomy as well as kayaking. Another very important option from my experience in astronomy is the dew and moisture that you will encounter. These binoculars are nitrogen purged and water resistant. This will be sufficient for the occasional splash of water (possibly even a dunking but I don't want to test that out) and the dew that forms as the nights get cold.I finally got a chance to take them out on the water at Lake Wickaboag in West Warren Massachusetts. The day was unfortunately windy and the water choppy. These binoculars luckily come with attached lens rubber lens covers. They got a work out as I paddled out and where covered with splash marks but the eyepieces where nice and dry whenever I opened them up. The one issue I do have is the objective covers are held on by a small strap and at the end of the day I was missing one until I found it under the seat of my kayak as it had slipped off the end of the binoculars. I had originally thought the motion of the kayak and bouncing around would not be too noticeable with just 8X binoculars. It took some getting used to. I found I could minimize the rocking and steady myself a bit if I hunched down low (low center of gravity) and pressed my back against the seat. This made for steadier viewing. It is disconcerting being jostled and trying to view a still object on land when the bouncing is magnified. 8X seems to be perfect for use on a small craft. These binoculars brought in objects I could not or could just barely see with the unaided eye. Distant radio towers, a jetski being put in the water across the lake, individual feathers on an egret around 50' distant where all crystal clear in the view!I haven't spent as much time with these on the night sky as I have using these during the day. But all you have to do is point these straight up, focus on a bright star and you can't help but be impressed. Where you might only see small handful of stars it will look as if someone spilled salt in the sky as you will see many many times more stars! My first big test was to locate the Andromeda galaxy. Cassiopeia is easily visible from my site and it pointed me in the right direction. It took around four minutes to locate Andromeda. Some nebulosity was clearly visible with these little 8X42's! The Pleiades area also a site to see that look great in these binoculars. I did attempt to resolve the double star Mizar and was not able to resolve it as being a double. Perhaps if I mounted the binoculars as even small 8X42's seemed to bounce around a bit more than I'd like. I found it easiest to hold the binoculars snugly in the palms of both hands instead of using my fingers.The focusing is extremely easy to use and has a nice buttery feel to it. Setting up these binoculars is a fairly easy process. The left hand has its own focusing to account for any differences in your eye. Cover up the left hand objective (using the lenscap) and then focus it so that the view appears clear in your right hand eye using the main focus on the top. Next, swap the lens cover to the other side and use the small fine focus for your left eye. The last step is to insure that both your eyes are looking straight thru by widening the binoculars as needed. Once everything is perfectly in focus and you are looking straight thru you will see that objects up to several hundred yards now `pop' in and appear dimensional.As I mentioned earlier, I researched binoculars for a couple of months before making this purchase and was NOT disappointed. I was leaning towards a pair of Bushnell Legacy WP 8 x 42 Binocular Size: 8x42 due to the great reviews and similar specs. What pushed me back towards Celestron was how impressed I was with the Celestron 52268 C90 Mak Spotting scope (Black), Celestrons website with the compare option and of course Celestrons limited lifetime warranty! Any company that can offer this kind of warranty and still make a profit has to have a good & reliable product! 5Outstanding!! Just coming off safari. Outstanding binoculars. I took some iPhone photos through one side of the binos. A little crude but effective. 5Great Binos--Great Price This item showed up in a review article in "The Living Bird" published by the Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology.as the best binoculars available in the "bargain price range" in a review of several brands. I've had a Celestron spotting scope for 40 years, and never been disappointed with it. I wanted to replace my ageing binoculars, and Amazon's price for these was unbeatable--even a greater bargain than suggested by the Cornell Lab review. The review was correct. The images are the usual Celestron quality. The binoculars are relatively light-weight, the field of focus is excellent, especially for bird-watching, the adjustments are easily accomplished, and the lens covers and case are very utilitarian. An excellent product at a bargain price. 5Inexpensive for good quality Recommended at one point by Cornell Ornithology as one of the best economy binoculars, and I agree. They're not as good as the $1,300 pair that blew my mind when I borrowed them from some professional naturalist on some beach walk, but they are way better than the cheap ones that I have gotten year after year for decades. I finally decided to buy a decent pair. Fairly good close focus (good for birds that are only 7 or 8 feet away, whn you want to see every feather), sturdy and seem unlikely to break, not too heavy, easy to use, the lens caps can be set up so that they can be taken off without them automatically falling to the ground. Very good step up if you are tired of cheap binoculars, but you are still an "economy minded" person like me. 5Outstanding image for price This is my first pair of binoculars for birding, and I chose them based on a list published by the National Audubon Society; these were the highest rated bins in the get in the game category.First off, they don t feel too heavy in the hand, and they have a nice rubber coating all around which make them really comfortable to hold. However, the included neck strap isn t so great since the edges are kinda scratchy.The image quality is excellent, especially for the price. At 8x magnification, you re obviously not going to get a great image when looking at a kite from 100 yards away, but anything reasonably close looks amazing. The color is true, and the field of view is pretty wide. And here s something that really sets these apart from a less expensive model also by Celestron that I bought for my son: these are really, really good at close focus. I m able to view objects (and birds like common paraques that often sleep near trails) at just 5 feet away. I can see every detail in a paraque s plumage, for example, that I simply cannot achieve with the less expensive model.The eye relief afforded by this model is good, too, and the twist telescopic eye cup feels nice and sturdy, another major difference between this and the cheaper model. 5BEST VALUE FOR MONEY EVALUATED BY Phd ECOLOGIST After evaluating a lot of 8X42s this turns out the best value for money. Spending a lot of time with really great birders, I always have the feeling, that many of them want to have a Leica or Zeiss for the prestige. When I ask them their opinion on these Celestrons, they look at me with some hidden comtempt......... After all, I am not a real birder, but just a professional ecologist......... in spite of my PhD and 5 decades in the field: NOT A BIRDER!. And they are right. However, my vision is still 20-20. And you know what? I just don't see all that much difference between those $2000+ binoculars and these $125! I once had a real Leica 8X42 and I lost it...... I felt so bad. Now, if something happens to these Celestrons, I just smile and think, glad they were not Leicas. Folks, I tested more than 20 different under $200 brands, and these represent the best value for money. Don't hesitate to buy these. And if you travel to a developing country, donate them to a park ranger! those guys rarely have decent equipment and the protect nature under very difficult conditions. 5Not bad not great Was not as nice as I was expecting from the description or reviews. Don t get me wrong, they are not horrible. However they are not a 5 Star item. I ordered them as an upgrade to my Leupold Yosemite Porto Prism 8x30 binoculars. Going from 30mm to 42mm I expected improvements in low light. How ever my Leupolds did just as well if not better. Also if you have a large head like myself you might find these hard to adjust for your eye spacing. I should have know at the price point they wouldn t live up to my expectations. How re these have so many reviews claiming they are a steal and have the build quality of a much more expensive pair. If it shoulda to good to be true.....I will stick with my Luepolds and save up for something else. I recommend if your looking for a great pair of binoculars trying them out in a store. If you don t have a lot to spend and want some decent birding binoculars I would recommend these if they are all you can afford. 3
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