• Belkin 12-Outlet Advanced Power Strip Surge Protector with 8-Foot Power Cord and Telephone / Coaxial Protection, 4000 Joules (BV112230-08)
  • Belkin 12-Outlet Advanced Power Strip Surge Protector with 8-Foot Power Cord and Telephone / Coaxial Protection, 4000 Joules (BV112230-08)
  • Belkin 12-Outlet Advanced Power Strip Surge Protector with 8-Foot Power Cord and Telephone / Coaxial Protection, 4000 Joules (BV112230-08)
  • Belkin 12-Outlet Advanced Power Strip Surge Protector with 8-Foot Power Cord and Telephone / Coaxial Protection, 4000 Joules (BV112230-08)
  • Belkin 12-Outlet Advanced Power Strip Surge Protector with 8-Foot Power Cord and Telephone / Coaxial Protection, 4000 Joules (BV112230-08)
  • Belkin 12-Outlet Advanced Power Strip Surge Protector with 8-Foot Power Cord and Telephone / Coaxial Protection, 4000 Joules (BV112230-08)
  • Belkin 12-Outlet Advanced Power Strip Surge Protector with 8-Foot Power Cord and Telephone / Coaxial Protection, 4000 Joules (BV112230-08)
  • Belkin 12-Outlet Advanced Power Strip Surge Protector with 8-Foot Power Cord and Telephone / Coaxial Protection, 4000 Joules (BV112230-08)
Belkin 12-Outlet Advanced Power Strip Surge Protector with 8-Foot Power Cord and Telephone / Coaxial Protection, 4000 Joules (BV112230-08)
Belkin 12-Outlet Advanced Power Strip Surge Protector with 8-Foot Power Cord and Telephone / Coaxial Protection, 4000 Joules (BV112230-08)
Belkin 12-Outlet Advanced Power Strip Surge Protector with 8-Foot Power Cord and Telephone / Coaxial Protection, 4000 Joules (BV112230-08)
Belkin 12-Outlet Advanced Power Strip Surge Protector with 8-Foot Power Cord and Telephone / Coaxial Protection, 4000 Joules (BV112230-08)
Belkin 12-Outlet Advanced Power Strip Surge Protector with 8-Foot Power Cord and Telephone / Coaxial Protection, 4000 Joules (BV112230-08)
Belkin 12-Outlet Advanced Power Strip Surge Protector with 8-Foot Power Cord and Telephone / Coaxial Protection, 4000 Joules (BV112230-08)
Belkin 12-Outlet Advanced Power Strip Surge Protector with 8-Foot Power Cord and Telephone / Coaxial Protection, 4000 Joules (BV112230-08)
Belkin 12-Outlet Advanced Power Strip Surge Protector with 8-Foot Power Cord and Telephone / Coaxial Protection, 4000 Joules (BV112230-08)

Belkin 12-Outlet Advanced Power Strip Surge Protector with 8-Foot Power Cord and Telephone / Coaxial Protection, 4000 Joules (BV112230-08)

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MRP: €78,00
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€130,00
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( 40% off )
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Expected Delivery: 21-28 days
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  • The Ultimate Surge Protector commands high performance, with superior power protection for your sensitive home theater equipment
  • By reducing powerline noise and damaging voltage fluctuations, Belkin Surge Protectors safeguards HDTVs, stereo and satellite systems, Blu ray players, video game consoles, and more
  • Keep your high end equipment protected, while ensuring the clearest picture and sound possible
  • $250,000 Connected Equipment Warranty. The product is also covered by Belkin Limited lifetime warranty

Customer Reviews

I am satisfied with my purchase Replaced two older surge protectors with Belkin power strip. I used all 12-outlets. Much nicer and cleaner look now behind my desk. Desktop PC, 50' Visio TV, modem, phone, Klipsch ProMedia 2.1 PC speaker system, and soundbar plugged into Belkin.DTE Energy came out to provide energy saving solutions to my home. One of the things the adviser mentioned was to get an advance power strip which would be more effective than the ordinary surge protectors (hope I never have to find out).So, at least, I am satisfied with my purchase. Price was just right as well! 5Not Gigabit Ethernet I got the one with ethernet protection. It's a good power strip, but the lack of details on the Amazon listing caused me to waste my money. I was connected to a different Belkin power strip when my router got fried due to a lightning strike. My laptop is acting weird now, too (It's running Linux so it's not malware). I figured that since my ethernet wasn't surge protected that was the reason why my router, and possibly my laptop, got fried. About an hour after that happened I ordered this power strip because it had ethernet protection. As of 08/19/2018, nowhere on this Amazon listing does it say what speed ethernet it supports. I assumed since it's a current product that it would support gigabit ethernet, since nothing being sold new right now would probably have anything less. It turns out that this only supports up to 100 megabit. That's not going to be enough for my fiber connection. I'll keep this power strip, but I just hope I don't get hit by lightning again because my new router will probably get fried because I can't use the ethernet protection.I just looked everywhere on the box it came in and it also doesn't list what speed ethernet it has. This almost seems dishonest. 1While I like these when they work While I like these when they work, I find that there is just really poor quality control with these. About every other one of these that I purchase, the overload protection trips at too load of a level (around 1375 watts) when they indicate that they support 1850 continuous watts. If you get one that doesn't trip at low wattage levels, they are great though. The problem is, those are hard to find. 3Pretty good surge protector Pretty good surge protector. It seems like it's impossible to get a perfect one - this is the best I have so far. I don't like how the plug that goes into the wall has a fixed 90 degree angle to it - the outlet I use already has one plug like that going in from my FIOS adapter, and it makes it possible to use two plugs of this type in the same outlet. As usual, some of the DC adapters still block neighboring outlets on the strip but that's almost an inevitability. If you buy a 12-outlet strip, you just can't expect to be able to use all 12. 4Lots of well placed outlets for home entertainment systems I purchased this power strip so that I could have enough power outlets for my TV/entertainment system. Not that it is an enormous or sophisticated setup but every little device requires it's own power supply. It is basically a TV, Roku, DVD player, sound bar, subwoofer, chromecast, HDMI switch and a clock radio. Just enough so that the average power strip just isn't enough. Nothing that requires a lot of power but the wall warts make getting it all plugged in a challenge. So when I saw this I was hoping it would solve my issue. (BTW I have a lamp plugged into the other plug on the outlet.)The six center outlets are just like on any cheap power strip. Good if you're just using normal wall-style plugs. The six (three on each side) outlets are turned 90 degrees and well spaced for even larger wall wart power supplies. All of my devices plug in very neatly and I've only needed to use a single power strip. Yes, it's double the size of a lot of power strips since basically it is two power strips in one case. Seems to work without issue as long as you don't plug in lots of high current items. I can't comment on the phone jacks or cable tv jacks since I don't use them.Overall this is a quality piece of hardware. Probably wouldn't use it in the garage for a bunch of power tools, but for the average TV setup it should be perfect. I probably will purchase another one for my computer as well. 5Invest in a good surge protector like this - little cost for very good protection for the money MARCH 2017: I usually only do reviews for 5 star and 1 star items. In this case, give this surge protector 5 stars.Over 30 years, I lived in multiple states in the Southern USA - Florida,Georgia, and Texas, and the lightning storms are the worse inthat part fo the country. I mean brutal! House rattling. Extreme. And sometimes with hail besides. And we also had brown-outs.Around 2007, one of our homes was hit by lightning; it blew out the outside floodlights, burned a hole in the roof, and welost some electrical devices, BUT WE LOST NO DEVICE that was plugged into a surge protector. It did burn out all thesurge protectors we had -- I think 5 of them. And depending upon your home or apartment insurance company, you may getreimbursed for them if you ever get hit.I bought 3 of these over a few months. I selected the model with ETHERNET protection, not the USB port version.If you need extra USB ports to charge your devices, buy one of the multi-port boxes (sold on AMAZON) that are about 3 inches by 3 inches in size and have AC on one end and 4 or more USB ports. Plug this into your surge protector.The features of this BELKING POWER STRIP include:- power on/off switchwith green led power on light- surge protection for your DVR, or cable or satelite receiver (if they get their signalfrom a coax cable)- includes EMI / RFI filtering to remove these "noise" signals which can give you "buszzes" or"hums" in the audio of your TV or surround sound system.- surge protection for your cable modem or router, if it gets its signal from an ethernetcable- 12 outlets and surge protection for each; 6 of these are on the outer edge so it shouldaccomodate the power transformers (the black boxes with an AC plug) for some deviceslike printers, a TV sound bar, cable modem, etc- heavy duty power cable to run to the AC outletBuy from AMAZON a quad-shielded (that is the amount of signal insulation around the inside cable)RG6 coax cable. Pick a length like 4 feet or so. Your coax from the wall goes into thesurge protector "COAX IN". Then run this new RG6 cable from the surge protector "COAX OUT" to yourDVR /cable / satelite receiver.Buy (from AMAZON) an ethernet patch cable. Similar to the coax cable, run the existing cable from the wall into thesurge protector "IN". Then use your patch cable to run from the surge protector "OUT" to your cable modem or router.NOTE: I've never made a claim to any surge protector company; most include damage "insurance"with the purchase of the surge protector for devices you plug into the surge protector.Keep your receipts for all purchases. Personally, I'd rather buy a good surge protector than rely on a claimfor a burnt out 60" TV or expensive audio equipment, and expect to get paid without a lot of hassle.Do they depreciate the device - e.g. a $2,000 TV from 2 years ago that sells for $600 today ?How much would you get?Do they only pay you what your home insurance does not pay for? Who knows. 5Good Quality I have three of these and they seem to work well. Two of them are protecting my a/v equipment and one is in my office for my computers and they have been in use for over 2 years. I haven't experienced any problem with any of them and we have had several power outages and electrical storms while they have been in use. I'm not sure this has caused any power surge because they haven't been tripped, but I also haven't had any damage to any of my equipment. 5Perfect Placement of Outlets for Oversized TV Devices Plugs. Definitely worth getting!!!! I have so much room to plug in everything I needed and even w the way it is set up w the row in the middle if the plug is wide it will still fit in the middle bc they left enough room btw the plugs. Love the extra space, perfectly layed out for awkward plugs. Very happy. With my old power surg protector the wider plugs took up two spaces and was planning on having to put them out the outside very far spaced plugs but they actually fit great in the middle row bc the extra space left I was shocked. I bought this bc I was planning on having to use the outter ones for these wider plugs but they fit in the middle now I got extra room. Like the Amazon Fire Stick was wide plug and it fits perfect in the middle. 5Does the job for my HDTV and other connected devices and equipment This particular surge protector is nicer than the Belkin BE112234 which is a slimmer gray model that seems to be built using Lego's. I had to return it to get this advanced version which is MASSIVE but seems to be much better built and quality. I slapped two Command picture velcro strips on the back and attached it to my wall near my home theater system. Seems to do the job quite well. However it doesn't get 5 stars because it's got telephone and coaxial jacks which I could care less. Especially since I don't own a landline telephone. Wasted space and two pointless features that I don't really need. Belkin should have other options and models on the market for users that don't care about having telephone jacks or coaxial on their surge protector. I much prefer USB ports. I would also love if the cable was 10 foot long.The end plug is flat but is not all that super flat slim like the Belkin BE112234. It's still a bit of a bulky head. However it's not a right or left angle plug. I do prefer the plug being this way (no right/left angle type) as I find it much neater and the 8-foot wire can be steered to go either direction.I also wish the 8 foot cord was white (considering that the surge protector is partially white) and not dark gray to blend in with white walls. Oh well.Pros:-Better built than Belkin BE112234-Not an angled plug (works better), just straight with a bulky flat head (not low profile enough)Cons:-On/Off switch feels flimsy-Cord cable is not white-Low profile plug is not all that slim like Belkin BE112234-Telephone/Coaxial protection should be eliminated 4What Belkin got wrong [NOTE: they have lumped reviews for several models together on this page. To be clear I am reviewing the 6-foot 8-outlet model which does NOT have a swivel plug]Like many people I have many AC power strips located all over my house. While they all serve their purpose, some are better than others. And some are definitely worse than others. I have yet to find the perfect power strip; it seems there is always at least one flaw.I bought this one for a very specialized project but the pros and cons should apply to any household application you buy it for.What I was looking for is a power strip with wide spacing between the individual outlets. You would be surprised how few are made that way. It makes me wonder if the manufacturers ever actually plug things in to their products when they are designing them. The reason this is important is that these days many thing use power transformers. While those bricks are small they still take up more space than a regular power plug, often making it difficult or impossible to use the outlet right next to it. For that reason I have found that power strips which have the outlets mounted sideways are more useful than those that mount the outlets up/down, yet most power strips seem to do just that.After narrowing it down to finding a power strip that mounts the outlets sideways, I like to have space around them to accommodate those power bricks. Again, that criterion narrows my choices, as most brands tend to crowd the outlets close together.After I lot of searching I found this one from Belkin, a company I have had good luck with in the past. Not only are the outlets well-spaced but they are staggered, which is even better.My unique project that I bought it for was to build a battery recharging station in my garage. The wide-spaced and staggered outlets of this power strip worked out really well to be able to mount 3 eneloop chargers to it so I can charge up to 12 of those specialized batteries at one time. The strip has enough available outlets that I could also plug in a recharger for standard NiCad batteries and also the charger for my power tools. When not in use if I want I can turn the whole charging station off with the master switch on the Belkin.WHY NOT 5-STARS?Overall this is a well-made power strip with a heavy-duty cord but it has its quirks that detract from being a great product. The first is something that I ve seen in power strips from many companies lately (leading me to believe they are all being made on the same assembly line). That is that the keyholes on the back of the strip are only notched in one direction, which is to mount the strip vertically with the cord coming out of the bottom. I wanted to mount it horizontally but the way the keyholes are made the strip would easily be knocked off the wall by brushing up against it. Most power strips used to be made with + shaped keyholes so the unit could be mounted in any orientation. The other complaint is that the way keyholes are molded into the plastic these days rather than being an open hole there is a plastic backing to the keyhole, which means you can only use small flathead screws which eliminates using molly screws or similar to mount the strip to wallboard. If you mount the strip the only way the keyholes will let you, the Belkin name logo is upside-down. Not really important, just bad design.The other little issue is that this power strip has those little plastic sliders over the outlets that are supposed to make it childproof. They are ridiculously flimsy, the first time I unplugged something the little piece of plastic broke and fell out.I like the Belkin power strip and feel it just barely earns 4-stars because of the layout of the outlets, but I m disappointed in the overall quality and the very poorly designed mounting keyholes. 4
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Reviews

Customer Reviews

I am satisfied with my purchase Replaced two older surge protectors with Belkin power strip. I used all 12-outlets. Much nicer and cleaner look now behind my desk. Desktop PC, 50' Visio TV, modem, phone, Klipsch ProMedia 2.1 PC speaker system, and soundbar plugged into Belkin.DTE Energy came out to provide energy saving solutions to my home. One of the things the adviser mentioned was to get an advance power strip which would be more effective than the ordinary surge protectors (hope I never have to find out).So, at least, I am satisfied with my purchase. Price was just right as well! 5Not Gigabit Ethernet I got the one with ethernet protection. It's a good power strip, but the lack of details on the Amazon listing caused me to waste my money. I was connected to a different Belkin power strip when my router got fried due to a lightning strike. My laptop is acting weird now, too (It's running Linux so it's not malware). I figured that since my ethernet wasn't surge protected that was the reason why my router, and possibly my laptop, got fried. About an hour after that happened I ordered this power strip because it had ethernet protection. As of 08/19/2018, nowhere on this Amazon listing does it say what speed ethernet it supports. I assumed since it's a current product that it would support gigabit ethernet, since nothing being sold new right now would probably have anything less. It turns out that this only supports up to 100 megabit. That's not going to be enough for my fiber connection. I'll keep this power strip, but I just hope I don't get hit by lightning again because my new router will probably get fried because I can't use the ethernet protection.I just looked everywhere on the box it came in and it also doesn't list what speed ethernet it has. This almost seems dishonest. 1While I like these when they work While I like these when they work, I find that there is just really poor quality control with these. About every other one of these that I purchase, the overload protection trips at too load of a level (around 1375 watts) when they indicate that they support 1850 continuous watts. If you get one that doesn't trip at low wattage levels, they are great though. The problem is, those are hard to find. 3Pretty good surge protector Pretty good surge protector. It seems like it's impossible to get a perfect one - this is the best I have so far. I don't like how the plug that goes into the wall has a fixed 90 degree angle to it - the outlet I use already has one plug like that going in from my FIOS adapter, and it makes it possible to use two plugs of this type in the same outlet. As usual, some of the DC adapters still block neighboring outlets on the strip but that's almost an inevitability. If you buy a 12-outlet strip, you just can't expect to be able to use all 12. 4Lots of well placed outlets for home entertainment systems I purchased this power strip so that I could have enough power outlets for my TV/entertainment system. Not that it is an enormous or sophisticated setup but every little device requires it's own power supply. It is basically a TV, Roku, DVD player, sound bar, subwoofer, chromecast, HDMI switch and a clock radio. Just enough so that the average power strip just isn't enough. Nothing that requires a lot of power but the wall warts make getting it all plugged in a challenge. So when I saw this I was hoping it would solve my issue. (BTW I have a lamp plugged into the other plug on the outlet.)The six center outlets are just like on any cheap power strip. Good if you're just using normal wall-style plugs. The six (three on each side) outlets are turned 90 degrees and well spaced for even larger wall wart power supplies. All of my devices plug in very neatly and I've only needed to use a single power strip. Yes, it's double the size of a lot of power strips since basically it is two power strips in one case. Seems to work without issue as long as you don't plug in lots of high current items. I can't comment on the phone jacks or cable tv jacks since I don't use them.Overall this is a quality piece of hardware. Probably wouldn't use it in the garage for a bunch of power tools, but for the average TV setup it should be perfect. I probably will purchase another one for my computer as well. 5Invest in a good surge protector like this - little cost for very good protection for the money MARCH 2017: I usually only do reviews for 5 star and 1 star items. In this case, give this surge protector 5 stars.Over 30 years, I lived in multiple states in the Southern USA - Florida,Georgia, and Texas, and the lightning storms are the worse inthat part fo the country. I mean brutal! House rattling. Extreme. And sometimes with hail besides. And we also had brown-outs.Around 2007, one of our homes was hit by lightning; it blew out the outside floodlights, burned a hole in the roof, and welost some electrical devices, BUT WE LOST NO DEVICE that was plugged into a surge protector. It did burn out all thesurge protectors we had -- I think 5 of them. And depending upon your home or apartment insurance company, you may getreimbursed for them if you ever get hit.I bought 3 of these over a few months. I selected the model with ETHERNET protection, not the USB port version.If you need extra USB ports to charge your devices, buy one of the multi-port boxes (sold on AMAZON) that are about 3 inches by 3 inches in size and have AC on one end and 4 or more USB ports. Plug this into your surge protector.The features of this BELKING POWER STRIP include:- power on/off switchwith green led power on light- surge protection for your DVR, or cable or satelite receiver (if they get their signalfrom a coax cable)- includes EMI / RFI filtering to remove these "noise" signals which can give you "buszzes" or"hums" in the audio of your TV or surround sound system.- surge protection for your cable modem or router, if it gets its signal from an ethernetcable- 12 outlets and surge protection for each; 6 of these are on the outer edge so it shouldaccomodate the power transformers (the black boxes with an AC plug) for some deviceslike printers, a TV sound bar, cable modem, etc- heavy duty power cable to run to the AC outletBuy from AMAZON a quad-shielded (that is the amount of signal insulation around the inside cable)RG6 coax cable. Pick a length like 4 feet or so. Your coax from the wall goes into thesurge protector "COAX IN". Then run this new RG6 cable from the surge protector "COAX OUT" to yourDVR /cable / satelite receiver.Buy (from AMAZON) an ethernet patch cable. Similar to the coax cable, run the existing cable from the wall into thesurge protector "IN". Then use your patch cable to run from the surge protector "OUT" to your cable modem or router.NOTE: I've never made a claim to any surge protector company; most include damage "insurance"with the purchase of the surge protector for devices you plug into the surge protector.Keep your receipts for all purchases. Personally, I'd rather buy a good surge protector than rely on a claimfor a burnt out 60" TV or expensive audio equipment, and expect to get paid without a lot of hassle.Do they depreciate the device - e.g. a $2,000 TV from 2 years ago that sells for $600 today ?How much would you get?Do they only pay you what your home insurance does not pay for? Who knows. 5Good Quality I have three of these and they seem to work well. Two of them are protecting my a/v equipment and one is in my office for my computers and they have been in use for over 2 years. I haven't experienced any problem with any of them and we have had several power outages and electrical storms while they have been in use. I'm not sure this has caused any power surge because they haven't been tripped, but I also haven't had any damage to any of my equipment. 5Perfect Placement of Outlets for Oversized TV Devices Plugs. Definitely worth getting!!!! I have so much room to plug in everything I needed and even w the way it is set up w the row in the middle if the plug is wide it will still fit in the middle bc they left enough room btw the plugs. Love the extra space, perfectly layed out for awkward plugs. Very happy. With my old power surg protector the wider plugs took up two spaces and was planning on having to put them out the outside very far spaced plugs but they actually fit great in the middle row bc the extra space left I was shocked. I bought this bc I was planning on having to use the outter ones for these wider plugs but they fit in the middle now I got extra room. Like the Amazon Fire Stick was wide plug and it fits perfect in the middle. 5Does the job for my HDTV and other connected devices and equipment This particular surge protector is nicer than the Belkin BE112234 which is a slimmer gray model that seems to be built using Lego's. I had to return it to get this advanced version which is MASSIVE but seems to be much better built and quality. I slapped two Command picture velcro strips on the back and attached it to my wall near my home theater system. Seems to do the job quite well. However it doesn't get 5 stars because it's got telephone and coaxial jacks which I could care less. Especially since I don't own a landline telephone. Wasted space and two pointless features that I don't really need. Belkin should have other options and models on the market for users that don't care about having telephone jacks or coaxial on their surge protector. I much prefer USB ports. I would also love if the cable was 10 foot long.The end plug is flat but is not all that super flat slim like the Belkin BE112234. It's still a bit of a bulky head. However it's not a right or left angle plug. I do prefer the plug being this way (no right/left angle type) as I find it much neater and the 8-foot wire can be steered to go either direction.I also wish the 8 foot cord was white (considering that the surge protector is partially white) and not dark gray to blend in with white walls. Oh well.Pros:-Better built than Belkin BE112234-Not an angled plug (works better), just straight with a bulky flat head (not low profile enough)Cons:-On/Off switch feels flimsy-Cord cable is not white-Low profile plug is not all that slim like Belkin BE112234-Telephone/Coaxial protection should be eliminated 4What Belkin got wrong [NOTE: they have lumped reviews for several models together on this page. To be clear I am reviewing the 6-foot 8-outlet model which does NOT have a swivel plug]Like many people I have many AC power strips located all over my house. While they all serve their purpose, some are better than others. And some are definitely worse than others. I have yet to find the perfect power strip; it seems there is always at least one flaw.I bought this one for a very specialized project but the pros and cons should apply to any household application you buy it for.What I was looking for is a power strip with wide spacing between the individual outlets. You would be surprised how few are made that way. It makes me wonder if the manufacturers ever actually plug things in to their products when they are designing them. The reason this is important is that these days many thing use power transformers. While those bricks are small they still take up more space than a regular power plug, often making it difficult or impossible to use the outlet right next to it. For that reason I have found that power strips which have the outlets mounted sideways are more useful than those that mount the outlets up/down, yet most power strips seem to do just that.After narrowing it down to finding a power strip that mounts the outlets sideways, I like to have space around them to accommodate those power bricks. Again, that criterion narrows my choices, as most brands tend to crowd the outlets close together.After I lot of searching I found this one from Belkin, a company I have had good luck with in the past. Not only are the outlets well-spaced but they are staggered, which is even better.My unique project that I bought it for was to build a battery recharging station in my garage. The wide-spaced and staggered outlets of this power strip worked out really well to be able to mount 3 eneloop chargers to it so I can charge up to 12 of those specialized batteries at one time. The strip has enough available outlets that I could also plug in a recharger for standard NiCad batteries and also the charger for my power tools. When not in use if I want I can turn the whole charging station off with the master switch on the Belkin.WHY NOT 5-STARS?Overall this is a well-made power strip with a heavy-duty cord but it has its quirks that detract from being a great product. The first is something that I ve seen in power strips from many companies lately (leading me to believe they are all being made on the same assembly line). That is that the keyholes on the back of the strip are only notched in one direction, which is to mount the strip vertically with the cord coming out of the bottom. I wanted to mount it horizontally but the way the keyholes are made the strip would easily be knocked off the wall by brushing up against it. Most power strips used to be made with + shaped keyholes so the unit could be mounted in any orientation. The other complaint is that the way keyholes are molded into the plastic these days rather than being an open hole there is a plastic backing to the keyhole, which means you can only use small flathead screws which eliminates using molly screws or similar to mount the strip to wallboard. If you mount the strip the only way the keyholes will let you, the Belkin name logo is upside-down. Not really important, just bad design.The other little issue is that this power strip has those little plastic sliders over the outlets that are supposed to make it childproof. They are ridiculously flimsy, the first time I unplugged something the little piece of plastic broke and fell out.I like the Belkin power strip and feel it just barely earns 4-stars because of the layout of the outlets, but I m disappointed in the overall quality and the very poorly designed mounting keyholes. 4
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