• Arctic Freezer Xtreme   160 Watts Twin Tower Heatsink Cpu Cooler   Intel & Amd   120 Mm Pwm Fan   4
  • Arctic Freezer Xtreme   160 Watts Twin Tower Heatsink Cpu Cooler   Intel & Amd   120 Mm Pwm Fan   4
  • Arctic Freezer Xtreme   160 Watts Twin Tower Heatsink Cpu Cooler   Intel & Amd   120 Mm Pwm Fan   4
  • Arctic Freezer Xtreme   160 Watts Twin Tower Heatsink Cpu Cooler   Intel & Amd   120 Mm Pwm Fan   4
  • Arctic Freezer Xtreme   160 Watts Twin Tower Heatsink Cpu Cooler   Intel & Amd   120 Mm Pwm Fan   4
  • Arctic Freezer Xtreme   160 Watts Twin Tower Heatsink Cpu Cooler   Intel & Amd   120 Mm Pwm Fan   4
  • Arctic Freezer Xtreme   160 Watts Twin Tower Heatsink Cpu Cooler   Intel & Amd   120 Mm Pwm Fan   4
  • Arctic Freezer Xtreme   160 Watts Twin Tower Heatsink Cpu Cooler   Intel & Amd   120 Mm Pwm Fan   4
Arctic Freezer Xtreme   160 Watts Twin Tower Heatsink Cpu Cooler   Intel & Amd   120 Mm Pwm Fan   4
Arctic Freezer Xtreme   160 Watts Twin Tower Heatsink Cpu Cooler   Intel & Amd   120 Mm Pwm Fan   4
Arctic Freezer Xtreme   160 Watts Twin Tower Heatsink Cpu Cooler   Intel & Amd   120 Mm Pwm Fan   4
Arctic Freezer Xtreme   160 Watts Twin Tower Heatsink Cpu Cooler   Intel & Amd   120 Mm Pwm Fan   4
Arctic Freezer Xtreme   160 Watts Twin Tower Heatsink Cpu Cooler   Intel & Amd   120 Mm Pwm Fan   4
Arctic Freezer Xtreme   160 Watts Twin Tower Heatsink Cpu Cooler   Intel & Amd   120 Mm Pwm Fan   4
Arctic Freezer Xtreme   160 Watts Twin Tower Heatsink Cpu Cooler   Intel & Amd   120 Mm Pwm Fan   4
Arctic Freezer Xtreme   160 Watts Twin Tower Heatsink Cpu Cooler   Intel & Amd   120 Mm Pwm Fan   4

Arctic Freezer Xtreme 160 Watts Twin Tower Heatsink Cpu Cooler Intel & Amd 120 Mm Pwm Fan 4

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  • EXCELLENT COOLING PERFORMANCE: The unique heatsink design consisting of 102 fins and 4 double-sided heatpipes offers excellent cooling performance and improve heat transfer from the CPU. Tested by Hinnavaatlus, the Freezer Xtreme outperformed the stock cooler in reducing the CPU temperature by 18 degrees.
  • LOW NOISE: Complimented by Hardware Secrets for being the quietest cooler ever tested, the Freezer Xtreme features a central-mounted 120 mm fan with low noise impeller and patented fan holder to achieve quiet operation. Thanks to the PWM control, the fan speed adjusts according to the CPU temperature and thus the noise level remains at an absolute minimum which qualifies it as a silent cooler.
  • MULTI-COMPATIBILITY: The Freezer Xtreme features a wide compatibility with AMD and Intel sockets. This gives you plenty of flexibility and takes overclocking to a new level. The Freezer Xtreme is compatible with AMD Sockets FM2, FM1, AM3+, AM3, AM2+, AM2, 939, 754; Intel Sockets 1366, 1156, 1155, 775.
  • EASY INSTALLATION: Installing the Freezer Xtreme is a breeze. The push-pin mounting system provides excellent stability and it merely takes a few minutes to mount the cooler to the motherboard. The fiber reinforced retention module is sturdy and solid to support the cooler's weight during the installation process. Thanks to the pre-applied MX-2 thermal compound, a quick and clean installation is guaranteed!

Customer Reviews

This universal cooler can most (EVEN OEM) cases, and will provide amazing cooling/valueI have yet to try this on my AM4, but I did get to install it in an older HP OEM machine in which I put the qx6700.COOLING-4.9/5 STARS- For those who don't know, the qx6700 has 130W TDP, compared to high end i7 and ryzen 7 which have 95W TDP. Then I did the bsel mod, which boosted it 15%. That made the total power draw to circa 165W. My temps are around 40C idle, and 70C full load. My PC wouldn't even start with a 115W tdp cooler, so this thing is excellent at coolingInstallation (2/5)- the base plate on Intel is a breeze. Mounting the cooler to it? Freaking nightmare. The back end had a screw slot that was far too narrow for me to do it inside my case, so I had to take out my motherboard, install this, then reinstall all the cables to my motherboard afterwards...Value: THIS I'd where this cooler shines. The real value is you get hyper 212 Evo+ level cooling, in a much smaller form factor. It makes installation a little harder, but you can actually fit this into your case vs hyper 212, deepgammax 400, or any stnadard tower cooler which is 160mm (this is slightly under 140mm tall). That's what made me give this 5/5, is that I can get excellent cooling with something that fits into OEM cases and every single motherboard available right now.5Great Cooling UnitI installed the Artic Freezer 13 in an older Dell XPS 9100 after seeing cpu core temps consistently hit 100 degrees Celsius with the stock cooler. Of course, the computer is nearly 9 years old so the stock cooler has seen better days. After installation, the base core temps are near 38 C and performing the same high-stress functions has the cpu in the 70 C neighborhood with much less fan noise. That is some serious cooling!! Running Prime95 for an hour the cpu temps hit only 84 C, which is much better than 100 C. I am very pleased. However, my rating would have been 5 stars if not for a few issues with shipping. The shipping box was intact but the product packaging had damage on the top edge. Upon opening the box, the damage was on the fan-side so a portion of the fan shroud (plastic) was missing (laying in 4 small pieces in the bottom of the box). But the damage was not significant enough to return the item or interfere with its operation (super glue to the rescue). Installation should have been easier. From reading previous reviews it sounds like this product used to come with screws but the version I got now uses a set of plastic push pins. This just wasn t going to work with my Dell. The stock cooler back bracket is glued to the mobo. I would have had to remove the mobo to use the push pins but was unwilling to do so. Instead I visited my local hardware store and purchased a pack of #6 pan head screws (5/8 length). Using these I was able to attach the AF13 bracket to the stock Dell back plate. Success. The pre-applied thermal compound was sufficient and well placed. I had enough room that the cooler could have been placed in 1 of 4 positions so I chose to align the AF13 directly in line with the case fan so incoming (cooler) air is picked up by the AF13 fan and blown right through the fins. Very good design!4Awesome Beautiful. was debating going with a liquid cooling system but felt it was overkill for my apu. Hooked this up with ease. Keeps my 3.4ghz apu at 30c with light we browsing and a mere 47c when overclocked to 4.0ghz at full load. Love it. Will, and have, recommend it 5Best budget cooler on the marketThis cooler was kinda hard to install, and the fan is not upgrade-able. I would normally dock it 1 star for that. However, I still gave it 5 stars for 1 reason: This is in my opinion the most cost effective CPU cooler. I was looking around for a while, trying to find the most cost effective CPU cooler I could. I think I've found that with the ARCTIC Freezer Xtreme(currently rev. 2). This cooler solves a number of problems I've been having with my computer. I was previous just using the stock i7 cooler and getting by just fine. I wasn't over clocking it or anything. However, recently my current cooler just hasn't been cutting it any more and I've actually had a few crashes due to CPU over temp. With this cooler, that is a thing of the past. My hardware monitor used to read temps in excess of 99F. Now we are talking about temps in the mid 80s, while at max load for extended periods of time. Anyway. Simply said: this is one amazon purchase I don't regret ;)5Amazing cooling, potential space issuesThis cooler is SO close to being 5 stars. It's pretty easy to install (on an AM3+ socket, anyway) and holy crap does it keep the CPU cool. Maxing out my FX-6300, it doesn't go above 40 degrees now. It used to hit upwards of 70, sometimes even shutting down to prevent damage. It's quiet, it looks sweet, and it works like a dream! So, why is it not a 5 star product? it's too short. I had to remove a stick of RAM because the cooler extends far enough to the sides that it wouldn't fit otherwise. It doesn't sit above the memory, it tries to occupy the same space. So now I'm down to 75% memory capacity, in exchange for the best cooling I've ever had. A fair trade, and I'm overall very happy with it, but if I'd only been running 8 GB of RAM I'd be in trouble right now.4Good enough to cool i7 8700k overclocked to 5GHzI originally purchased a Thermaltake Slim X3 Low Profile CPU Fan for Intel LGA775/LGA1156 (CLP0534) which was perfectly adequate to cool the i7 8700k at stock CPU speeds, however I purchased the "k" version of the chip, with the intention of overclocking. This cooler was not nearly good enough to push that CPU at all. I was seeing temps over 100C, and the CPU throttling kicked in, so I was searching for something to replace that.I purchased this cooler because it was the biggest cooler that would fit in my case, and so far I'm very happy with it. I've overclocked the i7 8700k chip to 5GHz using the BIOS auto overclocking modes, and even under Prime95 torture test, I haven't yet seen temps rise over about 80C. At idle, I see temps near 30c, which is only a few degrees over ambient. (about 22C). So far very impressed.I have the fan configured to exhaust the hot air facing the rear of the case, right at the case fan, which is set to exhaust out the back of the case. There are no other case fans installed. The case used is a Corsair 100R, and the Graphics Card, which is in the top slot on the motherboard is a Radeon RX570.5Good performance for the price... When buying this fan, the truth was not expecting much or an acceptable result, I assumed it would be something better than the default fan that brings the i7-7700. The installation is not as simple as it says the packaging, place the fan and the two screws that hold it to the base, it is not at all simple, it requires patience and dexterity. On the other hand, no tool was required to attach the heatsink base to the motherboard lga 1151, although the truth is that I do not trust this fastening method much, something similar to stock fans. If we take a look at the materials, they are not of the best quality, so their power dissipation is suitable for an i7-7700, I know that maybe I abuse this heatsink, but it is the best way to prove its efficiency. Despite having 4 copper pipes and the 120mm fan in the center, it is not enough for a processor with TDP of 65w, you should definitely go for another more robust. In a controlled environment, the i7-7700 is maintained at 42 degrees without load, although as you will see in the video that accompanies this note, we do not reach 70, but EYE, we are under controlled temperature, but this would give you a clear idea of what what would you get from this heatsink? Something that I do not like, is the fact that the fan can not be changed, since it is a single piece with the fastening to the body of the heatsink itself. I recommend it? In summary ... Not for a TDP of 65w or higher. The performance is acceptable taking into account your cost, but going to the economic can be detrimental to your team. Directly you must go according to the TDP, I think this dissipator could be an accompanying idea for an i3 / Ryzen 3, but no more ... very maybe I can keep an i5 / Ryzen 5, but I really would not play it. I hope this is helpful, if so ... Leave that little hand up 5Good Value - but has some issuesI've owned this cooler since 4/2017. I've used it on an R5 1600 and R5 3600.For Ryzen 3000 applications - I would NOT recommend it. The contact plate is much smaller than the IHS, and Ryzen's new chiplet design makes that an issue, as heat is being generated further away from the center of the IHS.This cooler worked fine on my R5 1600. Temps never went above 75c under long p95 runs, but that was at a modest 3.8Ghz OC. Temp increases were linear.With my new R5 3600 however, it's not performing all that well. Temps reach about 80c within 5min, running p95 with a 4.2Ghz overclock, undervolted to 1.36v. I stopped the test at that point. Also, there are high temperature spikes under mixed loads. Temperatures would jump between 50 - 82c instantly, especially when one core was pegged.I've reinstalled & repasted the cooler twice at this point. (a real PITA with the AM4 mounting system BTW)Overall, I think this is a fine cooler for Intel or older Ryzen chips; especially considering the price. Just be aware that the AM4 mounting system is a real pain, and that the contact plate is relatively small.4its ok / likeable ... butIts doing the job, for my Ryzen 1700+, on an Asus Prime x370-pro. But its not without its caveats.1) not re-directional. You can't really disassemble or "assemble" the fan / heatsink to change the direction the air flows. In my case with that board, it means picking up air from the back side of my video card (Gigabyte Radeon RX580 - which already runs warm) and then venting toward the top of the case. It just so happens that the case I purchased does have fan openings there, but that's not usually the way cases are made.Other heatsinks have a squared attachment plate, that allows you to rotate the assembly in 90 (degree) increments so you could ... say .. turn the heatsink so the fan blows air to the back of the case, where it is more common to have a fan opening (and a case fan - so the heat gets pulled out).. so you'd rotate the bottom plate, attach plate/heatsink screws, and then mount to the motherboard.2) the height from board to heat fins & pipes is just 5 or so mm too close *above* the ram, such that if you get this heatsink, you'll want to make sure your ram and the RAM heatsink is as low profile as possible. For my comfort and peace of mind, I had to use DIMM slots 2 & 4 instead of 1 & 3 because the CPU Heatsink was touching and slightly pushing on my ram's heatsink (or heat spreader as some call theirs).3) to attach the heatsink to the motherboard you must take off the fan. And while its not difficult, its not as easy as turning a top mount screw (face it, once its attached and in your system, you're not going to get a screwdriver in there to put screws back in) but a better design for the "pop off" / "pop on", would be to have an alignment and attachment pin (or plastic tab) sticking out from the bottom (or up from the bottom of the heatsink), that goes into a hole at the bottom of the heatsink or on the fan housing, and then a locking tab at the top. That way, you would only have *one* clip to pop with a flat tip screwdriver, then push the top of the fan, away from the top of the heatsink, and lift upward to take it off the bottom pin/detent.4) because of the removal of the fan, and then re-attachment after, there is potential to slice-up your fingers from the sharp edges of the heatsink fins.5) attachment to the motherboard / CPU shroud, is via screws. I would wager this has something to do with some patent on using a locking lever with a tension lobe... but screws? really? So once its in place, hope the fan doesn't die, hope the heat dissipation holds up (dirt collection on fins?) because you'll have to take your whole system apart just to get it back off/out of there.Addendum - for removing the fan you may want to invest in a cheap ifixit or similar tool set which includes a flat thin and wide blade looking tool as its thin enough to easily wedge under the attachment clips of the fan, and has a longer handle than using a guitar pick like wedge which would also do in a pinch; using a flat tip screw driver isn't ideal as most are too thick at the end.Hopefully this gives an understanding of why I rate it only 3 stars. It does the job, but getting it in place, and for lack of a more thoughtful design, I can't rate it any higher.Sorry Arctic.3Unbelievable Cooling Power, inexpensive, and quiet. What more do you want? This review is specifically for the CO version of this cooler. I believe the only difference is the CO version uses copper along the heatsink and along the thermal conduction pipes. Copper, as you may know, is probably one of the best at conducting heat and definitely worth the extra cost. I am comparing this to the Arctic Arctic Alpine 11 Pro Rev 2 and Noctua C Type NH-C14S, which both fit in my HTPC Silverstone GD09B case, all of which I purchased on Amazon.History and Build:I am overclocking a Skylake i7 6700K, which I also purchased from Amazon. For cooling I originally purchased the Arctic Alpine 11 pro, however the problem with this cooler is that it blocks the adjacent ram slot on my motherboard which is the ASUS ROG Maximus 8 Gene for LGA1151. In a follow up email from Arctic, I told them my problem, and Antonio suggested I try the Freezer 13 for my motherboard. When I installed it, the ram was easily cleared, however the Blu Ray burner's cables were pushing on the cooler and I couldn't slide the drive all the way in to be flush. So I decided to just grab some pliers and pull off some portions of the fins from the cooler and this allowed my Blu Ray drive to slide all the way into the case. I was a little worried this would alter the cooling power.Comparison:- The Arctic 11 is not suitable for any significant overclocking, but far better than a stock cooler. The Artic 11 would hit 100 C very quickly and the computer would shut down. With no overclock and base voltage it ran fine.- The Noctua is designed for overclocking. Mind you this cooler cost me nearly 2.5 x the cost of the Freezer here on Amazon. With the Noctua cooler I was getting temperatures of around 99 degrees Celsius, which is very hot by the way, and I would not recommend this for extended periods. Baseline temps were around 27 degrees C.- I installed Arctic freezer cooler with the pre applied grease that was already on the cooler and the install was very easy, I did not have to remove the motherboard like I did for the Noctua. This is a huge plus. I flipped the fan upside down on the Artic Freezer cooler, so I did not have to look at the label. This did not alter the function of the cooler at all and was just for aesthetics.*** With the Artic Freezer 13 CO cooler my baseline temperature was 25 degrees Celsius, a degree or two cooler than the Noctua. During heavy testing I did not go past 95 degrees Celcius. I was stunned. I have Arctic Silver 5 lying around, which I normally would use but just wanted to try the thermal compound already on there. An additional huge difference was the sound. I could barely hear the fan on the Freezer during stress testing. The Noctua sounded like a turbine.I have a long history of overclocking and would say I am very qualified to review this product.Pros:- Low cost- Excellent thermal dissipation. I think the copper and the number of heat pipes play a huge role. Copper coolers are usually a lot more expensive.- The fan on this is also amazing. It is the most quiet CPU fan I have ever (Not) Heard lol.- Very easy install. I did not have to remove the motherboard to install a back plate.Cons- Maybe size or fit in some situations. It fits in my HTPC case, and you can look up the dimensions here on Amazon. You can also email Arctic and ask!The customer service and quality of the product are spectacular. They have just won a loyal customer! Stay cool! 5Impressive performance for a relatively short cooler So, after spending a few days with a stock Intel cooler, I found that it was a bit loud for my liking. I found the Arctic Freezer 13 after hunting for a good performing quiet cpu cooler that was less than 140mm tall and less than $30. I bought this used mainly becuse it was a few dollars less than new and will work just as well. It went on sale for $5 less the day after I ordered it, which was a bummer. It arrived in great shape, minus some leftover thermal paste residue. C'mon Arctic, I know it's used, but it only took a minute to clean off with some rubbing alcohol. That was a bit lazy and disappointing. However, they ended up sending me the CO (Continuous Operation) version, which has a much more durable fan and longer lifespan, so that's cool.Anyways, let's get to the point and talk about the product itself. First of all, installation was breeze. This was actually another selling point. Most other 3rd party LGA 115X coolers require the installation of an additional bracket on the underside of the of the motherboard. The Freezer 13 uses a top mounted clip-in bracket that doesn't require any access to the back of the motherboard. While this doesn't make much of a difference in a brand new build, it is extremely convenient in a replacement situation like my own. Performance-wise, this is a fantastic cooler. Compared to stock, I was seeing a 10 degree difference in idle temps and upwards of 25 degree difference under load. More impressive was how quiet it was. Now, it's not completely silent. Under load, the fan noise is still noticeable, but only if you're actively listening for ut. It's far from being attention grabbing like the stock Intel or previous generation gaming consoles.I'm very impressed by this cooler. It may not look quite as sexy as the competition, but it offers near silent cooling in a relatively compact package. I would give the product 5 stars on performance. However, I did have to dock a star for not cleaning off that residue before shipping it out. 4Wow! So unfortunately Arctic doesn't apparently produce their liquid cooler anymore, which was basically the best cooler on the entire market for the money by an insanely large margin. So this was purported to be the next best thing.Noise. It's insanely quiet. In fact I now miss the noise of my prior one turning on. :(Temp. Lowered the game I was having an issue with's CPU temp down by 20-30 degrees F on average. Still trying the rest of the games out. 90-100f is much much better than 120-130f. esp w summer coming up.Install. Fingers covered in thermal paste because I thought it had a sticker protecting me but it didn't. Besides that install was a breeze. The diagram explains how to do it. On the AM3+ at least, the outermost screws on the fasteners it gives you are perfect for it to snap in.Clearance. Clears my RAM easily and the cords are plenty lengthy to get where they need to go for this fan, and for everything else to route around it. I also don't have to worry anymore of my sync eating through all of my cabling like a chainsaw.In regards to it not being multi-directional. I looked at it first, and I don't know how it could be. They would have to manufacture two types I think. Because at least on my AM3+ the brackets are only one way.So, if you're like me and have 4 sticks of ram and need to clear it, this's your CPU fan! If you need liquid cooling, then this obviously isn't for you. Also every benchmark I said, it appeared temp-wise that liquid cooling is completely worthless unless you overclock. So I don't see the point until I get to AM4. Hope this helps all you AM3 folks out there! 5I think it rivals water cooling - Working excellentlyWOW, is this thing BIG! WOW, does it work GREAT!The System: ASUS Sabertooth 990FX GEN 1 8-core 3.1Ghz AMD FX, 125 Watt processor Thermaltake case with 4-120mm Antec Platinum 650 Power Supply 120mm running Kubuntu Linux 15.10 OSPRO: I ran eight instances of burnK6 which loads the processor to 100%, something that happens in real-life VERY rarely. Room Temp: about 78 Could NOT get the CPU above 122. That was impressive to me since the stock supplied AMD fan cooler would exceed 122 easily and then some. Given the size of this thing it should come as no surprise that it works. It IS very quiet.The fan blade is on squarely and NOT out of balance.CON: The fan is 140mm and PROPRIETARY in its design. There MIGHT be enough room to slide a standard slimline 140mm fan in but mounting it to the heatsink could be a challenge. Obviously, they did it ON PURPOSE. That ticks me off in the same way that some cell-phone makers use a proprietary cable to charge it - it is inconvenient and they do NOT care.Mounting it did NOT require removing the motherboard from the case and was pretty straight-forward. No real surprises.Orientation is perfect for my MB. Sucks air from over the memory, goes through itself and exits right in front of a 120mm fan to the outside. NICE.On MY case it prevents putting in the 5th fan that would be on the top of the case over the cpu. I wouldn't sweat that since the point ofthe fans is to move air and if what you HAVE IN THERE is doing the job, more fans would be redundant. The fan spot on top that isforward of that position IS usable, but barely. THAT'S a CASE issue, NOT a FAN issue.Quite pleased with it overall...So far. I DO NOT however, endorse their PC case fans.ADDITIONAL 1/3/16: I've notice something annoying. It cools SO WELL, that when the room is cool, the speed falls below its ability to generate rpm data correctly. I'm getting 9999 rpm, 6665, etc. Basically it was going mind-numb. This was tripping my rpm alarm in my bios till I set it down to 200 rpm on the low side and finally set it to ignore the alarm. I'm still quite happy with it overall.5I can see my RAM from here!The Arctic Freezer Extreme lowered temps on my 125w AMD FX-8120 by 10 degrees celcius over the OEM cooler (smaller heatpipe and fan cooler), now it runs at or under 50C (depending on which sensor is read) with 100% load on all 8 cores and idle temps are in the low 30s C. This cooler would certainly support overclocking a 125w TDP processor without thermal problems.Install was fairly easy and would have been even easier if I'd moved my case to a spot where it could be set on its side (getting the bottom clip engaged while the mobo is upright was fiddly, since it's right above the Northbridge heatsink on the PCB). Even better, the heatsink fins clear all surrounding obstacles and allow full access to all four RAM slots on the mobo, in addition airflow can be configured to exhaust toward the back of the case, where one of my case fans is located ...the larger Freezer 13 partially obscures RAM (making it impossible to use lage DIMMs with heat spreaders) and exhaust heat can only be directed up (directly into PSU) or down (on the GPU). Yet another benefit in my setup is the fact that the stock AMD cooler blows hot exhaust down on the motherboard, elevating socket and Northbridge temps as well as directing heat onto a nearby capacitor bank, the Freezer Extreme eliminates this issue as most of the CPU heat goes directly out the back of the case now.If you have a typical, cramped older ATX case with an AM3/AM3+ CPU, this is probably the best compromise between cooling performance and easy fit that you'll find.BTW, I can't hear this cooler fan over my PSU fan, even while CPU stress testing. The old AMD cooler used to be the loudest fan in the box unless the GPU was spun up for gaming.5
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Customer Reviews

This universal cooler can most (EVEN OEM) cases, and will provide amazing cooling/valueI have yet to try this on my AM4, but I did get to install it in an older HP OEM machine in which I put the qx6700.COOLING-4.9/5 STARS- For those who don't know, the qx6700 has 130W TDP, compared to high end i7 and ryzen 7 which have 95W TDP. Then I did the bsel mod, which boosted it 15%. That made the total power draw to circa 165W. My temps are around 40C idle, and 70C full load. My PC wouldn't even start with a 115W tdp cooler, so this thing is excellent at coolingInstallation (2/5)- the base plate on Intel is a breeze. Mounting the cooler to it? Freaking nightmare. The back end had a screw slot that was far too narrow for me to do it inside my case, so I had to take out my motherboard, install this, then reinstall all the cables to my motherboard afterwards...Value: THIS I'd where this cooler shines. The real value is you get hyper 212 Evo+ level cooling, in a much smaller form factor. It makes installation a little harder, but you can actually fit this into your case vs hyper 212, deepgammax 400, or any stnadard tower cooler which is 160mm (this is slightly under 140mm tall). That's what made me give this 5/5, is that I can get excellent cooling with something that fits into OEM cases and every single motherboard available right now.5Great Cooling UnitI installed the Artic Freezer 13 in an older Dell XPS 9100 after seeing cpu core temps consistently hit 100 degrees Celsius with the stock cooler. Of course, the computer is nearly 9 years old so the stock cooler has seen better days. After installation, the base core temps are near 38 C and performing the same high-stress functions has the cpu in the 70 C neighborhood with much less fan noise. That is some serious cooling!! Running Prime95 for an hour the cpu temps hit only 84 C, which is much better than 100 C. I am very pleased. However, my rating would have been 5 stars if not for a few issues with shipping. The shipping box was intact but the product packaging had damage on the top edge. Upon opening the box, the damage was on the fan-side so a portion of the fan shroud (plastic) was missing (laying in 4 small pieces in the bottom of the box). But the damage was not significant enough to return the item or interfere with its operation (super glue to the rescue). Installation should have been easier. From reading previous reviews it sounds like this product used to come with screws but the version I got now uses a set of plastic push pins. This just wasn t going to work with my Dell. The stock cooler back bracket is glued to the mobo. I would have had to remove the mobo to use the push pins but was unwilling to do so. Instead I visited my local hardware store and purchased a pack of #6 pan head screws (5/8 length). Using these I was able to attach the AF13 bracket to the stock Dell back plate. Success. The pre-applied thermal compound was sufficient and well placed. I had enough room that the cooler could have been placed in 1 of 4 positions so I chose to align the AF13 directly in line with the case fan so incoming (cooler) air is picked up by the AF13 fan and blown right through the fins. Very good design!4Awesome Beautiful. was debating going with a liquid cooling system but felt it was overkill for my apu. Hooked this up with ease. Keeps my 3.4ghz apu at 30c with light we browsing and a mere 47c when overclocked to 4.0ghz at full load. Love it. Will, and have, recommend it 5Best budget cooler on the marketThis cooler was kinda hard to install, and the fan is not upgrade-able. I would normally dock it 1 star for that. However, I still gave it 5 stars for 1 reason: This is in my opinion the most cost effective CPU cooler. I was looking around for a while, trying to find the most cost effective CPU cooler I could. I think I've found that with the ARCTIC Freezer Xtreme(currently rev. 2). This cooler solves a number of problems I've been having with my computer. I was previous just using the stock i7 cooler and getting by just fine. I wasn't over clocking it or anything. However, recently my current cooler just hasn't been cutting it any more and I've actually had a few crashes due to CPU over temp. With this cooler, that is a thing of the past. My hardware monitor used to read temps in excess of 99F. Now we are talking about temps in the mid 80s, while at max load for extended periods of time. Anyway. Simply said: this is one amazon purchase I don't regret ;)5Amazing cooling, potential space issuesThis cooler is SO close to being 5 stars. It's pretty easy to install (on an AM3+ socket, anyway) and holy crap does it keep the CPU cool. Maxing out my FX-6300, it doesn't go above 40 degrees now. It used to hit upwards of 70, sometimes even shutting down to prevent damage. It's quiet, it looks sweet, and it works like a dream! So, why is it not a 5 star product? it's too short. I had to remove a stick of RAM because the cooler extends far enough to the sides that it wouldn't fit otherwise. It doesn't sit above the memory, it tries to occupy the same space. So now I'm down to 75% memory capacity, in exchange for the best cooling I've ever had. A fair trade, and I'm overall very happy with it, but if I'd only been running 8 GB of RAM I'd be in trouble right now.4Good enough to cool i7 8700k overclocked to 5GHzI originally purchased a Thermaltake Slim X3 Low Profile CPU Fan for Intel LGA775/LGA1156 (CLP0534) which was perfectly adequate to cool the i7 8700k at stock CPU speeds, however I purchased the "k" version of the chip, with the intention of overclocking. This cooler was not nearly good enough to push that CPU at all. I was seeing temps over 100C, and the CPU throttling kicked in, so I was searching for something to replace that.I purchased this cooler because it was the biggest cooler that would fit in my case, and so far I'm very happy with it. I've overclocked the i7 8700k chip to 5GHz using the BIOS auto overclocking modes, and even under Prime95 torture test, I haven't yet seen temps rise over about 80C. At idle, I see temps near 30c, which is only a few degrees over ambient. (about 22C). So far very impressed.I have the fan configured to exhaust the hot air facing the rear of the case, right at the case fan, which is set to exhaust out the back of the case. There are no other case fans installed. The case used is a Corsair 100R, and the Graphics Card, which is in the top slot on the motherboard is a Radeon RX570.5Good performance for the price... When buying this fan, the truth was not expecting much or an acceptable result, I assumed it would be something better than the default fan that brings the i7-7700. The installation is not as simple as it says the packaging, place the fan and the two screws that hold it to the base, it is not at all simple, it requires patience and dexterity. On the other hand, no tool was required to attach the heatsink base to the motherboard lga 1151, although the truth is that I do not trust this fastening method much, something similar to stock fans. If we take a look at the materials, they are not of the best quality, so their power dissipation is suitable for an i7-7700, I know that maybe I abuse this heatsink, but it is the best way to prove its efficiency. Despite having 4 copper pipes and the 120mm fan in the center, it is not enough for a processor with TDP of 65w, you should definitely go for another more robust. In a controlled environment, the i7-7700 is maintained at 42 degrees without load, although as you will see in the video that accompanies this note, we do not reach 70, but EYE, we are under controlled temperature, but this would give you a clear idea of what what would you get from this heatsink? Something that I do not like, is the fact that the fan can not be changed, since it is a single piece with the fastening to the body of the heatsink itself. I recommend it? In summary ... Not for a TDP of 65w or higher. The performance is acceptable taking into account your cost, but going to the economic can be detrimental to your team. Directly you must go according to the TDP, I think this dissipator could be an accompanying idea for an i3 / Ryzen 3, but no more ... very maybe I can keep an i5 / Ryzen 5, but I really would not play it. I hope this is helpful, if so ... Leave that little hand up 5Good Value - but has some issuesI've owned this cooler since 4/2017. I've used it on an R5 1600 and R5 3600.For Ryzen 3000 applications - I would NOT recommend it. The contact plate is much smaller than the IHS, and Ryzen's new chiplet design makes that an issue, as heat is being generated further away from the center of the IHS.This cooler worked fine on my R5 1600. Temps never went above 75c under long p95 runs, but that was at a modest 3.8Ghz OC. Temp increases were linear.With my new R5 3600 however, it's not performing all that well. Temps reach about 80c within 5min, running p95 with a 4.2Ghz overclock, undervolted to 1.36v. I stopped the test at that point. Also, there are high temperature spikes under mixed loads. Temperatures would jump between 50 - 82c instantly, especially when one core was pegged.I've reinstalled & repasted the cooler twice at this point. (a real PITA with the AM4 mounting system BTW)Overall, I think this is a fine cooler for Intel or older Ryzen chips; especially considering the price. Just be aware that the AM4 mounting system is a real pain, and that the contact plate is relatively small.4its ok / likeable ... butIts doing the job, for my Ryzen 1700+, on an Asus Prime x370-pro. But its not without its caveats.1) not re-directional. You can't really disassemble or "assemble" the fan / heatsink to change the direction the air flows. In my case with that board, it means picking up air from the back side of my video card (Gigabyte Radeon RX580 - which already runs warm) and then venting toward the top of the case. It just so happens that the case I purchased does have fan openings there, but that's not usually the way cases are made.Other heatsinks have a squared attachment plate, that allows you to rotate the assembly in 90 (degree) increments so you could ... say .. turn the heatsink so the fan blows air to the back of the case, where it is more common to have a fan opening (and a case fan - so the heat gets pulled out).. so you'd rotate the bottom plate, attach plate/heatsink screws, and then mount to the motherboard.2) the height from board to heat fins & pipes is just 5 or so mm too close *above* the ram, such that if you get this heatsink, you'll want to make sure your ram and the RAM heatsink is as low profile as possible. For my comfort and peace of mind, I had to use DIMM slots 2 & 4 instead of 1 & 3 because the CPU Heatsink was touching and slightly pushing on my ram's heatsink (or heat spreader as some call theirs).3) to attach the heatsink to the motherboard you must take off the fan. And while its not difficult, its not as easy as turning a top mount screw (face it, once its attached and in your system, you're not going to get a screwdriver in there to put screws back in) but a better design for the "pop off" / "pop on", would be to have an alignment and attachment pin (or plastic tab) sticking out from the bottom (or up from the bottom of the heatsink), that goes into a hole at the bottom of the heatsink or on the fan housing, and then a locking tab at the top. That way, you would only have *one* clip to pop with a flat tip screwdriver, then push the top of the fan, away from the top of the heatsink, and lift upward to take it off the bottom pin/detent.4) because of the removal of the fan, and then re-attachment after, there is potential to slice-up your fingers from the sharp edges of the heatsink fins.5) attachment to the motherboard / CPU shroud, is via screws. I would wager this has something to do with some patent on using a locking lever with a tension lobe... but screws? really? So once its in place, hope the fan doesn't die, hope the heat dissipation holds up (dirt collection on fins?) because you'll have to take your whole system apart just to get it back off/out of there.Addendum - for removing the fan you may want to invest in a cheap ifixit or similar tool set which includes a flat thin and wide blade looking tool as its thin enough to easily wedge under the attachment clips of the fan, and has a longer handle than using a guitar pick like wedge which would also do in a pinch; using a flat tip screw driver isn't ideal as most are too thick at the end.Hopefully this gives an understanding of why I rate it only 3 stars. It does the job, but getting it in place, and for lack of a more thoughtful design, I can't rate it any higher.Sorry Arctic.3Unbelievable Cooling Power, inexpensive, and quiet. What more do you want? This review is specifically for the CO version of this cooler. I believe the only difference is the CO version uses copper along the heatsink and along the thermal conduction pipes. Copper, as you may know, is probably one of the best at conducting heat and definitely worth the extra cost. I am comparing this to the Arctic Arctic Alpine 11 Pro Rev 2 and Noctua C Type NH-C14S, which both fit in my HTPC Silverstone GD09B case, all of which I purchased on Amazon.History and Build:I am overclocking a Skylake i7 6700K, which I also purchased from Amazon. For cooling I originally purchased the Arctic Alpine 11 pro, however the problem with this cooler is that it blocks the adjacent ram slot on my motherboard which is the ASUS ROG Maximus 8 Gene for LGA1151. In a follow up email from Arctic, I told them my problem, and Antonio suggested I try the Freezer 13 for my motherboard. When I installed it, the ram was easily cleared, however the Blu Ray burner's cables were pushing on the cooler and I couldn't slide the drive all the way in to be flush. So I decided to just grab some pliers and pull off some portions of the fins from the cooler and this allowed my Blu Ray drive to slide all the way into the case. I was a little worried this would alter the cooling power.Comparison:- The Arctic 11 is not suitable for any significant overclocking, but far better than a stock cooler. The Artic 11 would hit 100 C very quickly and the computer would shut down. With no overclock and base voltage it ran fine.- The Noctua is designed for overclocking. Mind you this cooler cost me nearly 2.5 x the cost of the Freezer here on Amazon. With the Noctua cooler I was getting temperatures of around 99 degrees Celsius, which is very hot by the way, and I would not recommend this for extended periods. Baseline temps were around 27 degrees C.- I installed Arctic freezer cooler with the pre applied grease that was already on the cooler and the install was very easy, I did not have to remove the motherboard like I did for the Noctua. This is a huge plus. I flipped the fan upside down on the Artic Freezer cooler, so I did not have to look at the label. This did not alter the function of the cooler at all and was just for aesthetics.*** With the Artic Freezer 13 CO cooler my baseline temperature was 25 degrees Celsius, a degree or two cooler than the Noctua. During heavy testing I did not go past 95 degrees Celcius. I was stunned. I have Arctic Silver 5 lying around, which I normally would use but just wanted to try the thermal compound already on there. An additional huge difference was the sound. I could barely hear the fan on the Freezer during stress testing. The Noctua sounded like a turbine.I have a long history of overclocking and would say I am very qualified to review this product.Pros:- Low cost- Excellent thermal dissipation. I think the copper and the number of heat pipes play a huge role. Copper coolers are usually a lot more expensive.- The fan on this is also amazing. It is the most quiet CPU fan I have ever (Not) Heard lol.- Very easy install. I did not have to remove the motherboard to install a back plate.Cons- Maybe size or fit in some situations. It fits in my HTPC case, and you can look up the dimensions here on Amazon. You can also email Arctic and ask!The customer service and quality of the product are spectacular. They have just won a loyal customer! Stay cool! 5Impressive performance for a relatively short cooler So, after spending a few days with a stock Intel cooler, I found that it was a bit loud for my liking. I found the Arctic Freezer 13 after hunting for a good performing quiet cpu cooler that was less than 140mm tall and less than $30. I bought this used mainly becuse it was a few dollars less than new and will work just as well. It went on sale for $5 less the day after I ordered it, which was a bummer. It arrived in great shape, minus some leftover thermal paste residue. C'mon Arctic, I know it's used, but it only took a minute to clean off with some rubbing alcohol. That was a bit lazy and disappointing. However, they ended up sending me the CO (Continuous Operation) version, which has a much more durable fan and longer lifespan, so that's cool.Anyways, let's get to the point and talk about the product itself. First of all, installation was breeze. This was actually another selling point. Most other 3rd party LGA 115X coolers require the installation of an additional bracket on the underside of the of the motherboard. The Freezer 13 uses a top mounted clip-in bracket that doesn't require any access to the back of the motherboard. While this doesn't make much of a difference in a brand new build, it is extremely convenient in a replacement situation like my own. Performance-wise, this is a fantastic cooler. Compared to stock, I was seeing a 10 degree difference in idle temps and upwards of 25 degree difference under load. More impressive was how quiet it was. Now, it's not completely silent. Under load, the fan noise is still noticeable, but only if you're actively listening for ut. It's far from being attention grabbing like the stock Intel or previous generation gaming consoles.I'm very impressed by this cooler. It may not look quite as sexy as the competition, but it offers near silent cooling in a relatively compact package. I would give the product 5 stars on performance. However, I did have to dock a star for not cleaning off that residue before shipping it out. 4Wow! So unfortunately Arctic doesn't apparently produce their liquid cooler anymore, which was basically the best cooler on the entire market for the money by an insanely large margin. So this was purported to be the next best thing.Noise. It's insanely quiet. In fact I now miss the noise of my prior one turning on. :(Temp. Lowered the game I was having an issue with's CPU temp down by 20-30 degrees F on average. Still trying the rest of the games out. 90-100f is much much better than 120-130f. esp w summer coming up.Install. Fingers covered in thermal paste because I thought it had a sticker protecting me but it didn't. Besides that install was a breeze. The diagram explains how to do it. On the AM3+ at least, the outermost screws on the fasteners it gives you are perfect for it to snap in.Clearance. Clears my RAM easily and the cords are plenty lengthy to get where they need to go for this fan, and for everything else to route around it. I also don't have to worry anymore of my sync eating through all of my cabling like a chainsaw.In regards to it not being multi-directional. I looked at it first, and I don't know how it could be. They would have to manufacture two types I think. Because at least on my AM3+ the brackets are only one way.So, if you're like me and have 4 sticks of ram and need to clear it, this's your CPU fan! If you need liquid cooling, then this obviously isn't for you. Also every benchmark I said, it appeared temp-wise that liquid cooling is completely worthless unless you overclock. So I don't see the point until I get to AM4. Hope this helps all you AM3 folks out there! 5I think it rivals water cooling - Working excellentlyWOW, is this thing BIG! WOW, does it work GREAT!The System: ASUS Sabertooth 990FX GEN 1 8-core 3.1Ghz AMD FX, 125 Watt processor Thermaltake case with 4-120mm Antec Platinum 650 Power Supply 120mm running Kubuntu Linux 15.10 OSPRO: I ran eight instances of burnK6 which loads the processor to 100%, something that happens in real-life VERY rarely. Room Temp: about 78 Could NOT get the CPU above 122. That was impressive to me since the stock supplied AMD fan cooler would exceed 122 easily and then some. Given the size of this thing it should come as no surprise that it works. It IS very quiet.The fan blade is on squarely and NOT out of balance.CON: The fan is 140mm and PROPRIETARY in its design. There MIGHT be enough room to slide a standard slimline 140mm fan in but mounting it to the heatsink could be a challenge. Obviously, they did it ON PURPOSE. That ticks me off in the same way that some cell-phone makers use a proprietary cable to charge it - it is inconvenient and they do NOT care.Mounting it did NOT require removing the motherboard from the case and was pretty straight-forward. No real surprises.Orientation is perfect for my MB. Sucks air from over the memory, goes through itself and exits right in front of a 120mm fan to the outside. NICE.On MY case it prevents putting in the 5th fan that would be on the top of the case over the cpu. I wouldn't sweat that since the point ofthe fans is to move air and if what you HAVE IN THERE is doing the job, more fans would be redundant. The fan spot on top that isforward of that position IS usable, but barely. THAT'S a CASE issue, NOT a FAN issue.Quite pleased with it overall...So far. I DO NOT however, endorse their PC case fans.ADDITIONAL 1/3/16: I've notice something annoying. It cools SO WELL, that when the room is cool, the speed falls below its ability to generate rpm data correctly. I'm getting 9999 rpm, 6665, etc. Basically it was going mind-numb. This was tripping my rpm alarm in my bios till I set it down to 200 rpm on the low side and finally set it to ignore the alarm. I'm still quite happy with it overall.5I can see my RAM from here!The Arctic Freezer Extreme lowered temps on my 125w AMD FX-8120 by 10 degrees celcius over the OEM cooler (smaller heatpipe and fan cooler), now it runs at or under 50C (depending on which sensor is read) with 100% load on all 8 cores and idle temps are in the low 30s C. This cooler would certainly support overclocking a 125w TDP processor without thermal problems.Install was fairly easy and would have been even easier if I'd moved my case to a spot where it could be set on its side (getting the bottom clip engaged while the mobo is upright was fiddly, since it's right above the Northbridge heatsink on the PCB). Even better, the heatsink fins clear all surrounding obstacles and allow full access to all four RAM slots on the mobo, in addition airflow can be configured to exhaust toward the back of the case, where one of my case fans is located ...the larger Freezer 13 partially obscures RAM (making it impossible to use lage DIMMs with heat spreaders) and exhaust heat can only be directed up (directly into PSU) or down (on the GPU). Yet another benefit in my setup is the fact that the stock AMD cooler blows hot exhaust down on the motherboard, elevating socket and Northbridge temps as well as directing heat onto a nearby capacitor bank, the Freezer Extreme eliminates this issue as most of the CPU heat goes directly out the back of the case now.If you have a typical, cramped older ATX case with an AM3/AM3+ CPU, this is probably the best compromise between cooling performance and easy fit that you'll find.BTW, I can't hear this cooler fan over my PSU fan, even while CPU stress testing. The old AMD cooler used to be the loudest fan in the box unless the GPU was spun up for gaming.5
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