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Load image into Gallery viewer, Antennas Direct VHF / UHF Antenna Combiner, Indoor, Attic, Outdoor Use, All-weather Mounting Hardware, Adjustable Mast Clamp, Black - EU385CF-1S
Load image into Gallery viewer, Antennas Direct VHF / UHF Antenna Combiner, Indoor, Attic, Outdoor Use, All-weather Mounting Hardware, Adjustable Mast Clamp, Black - EU385CF-1S
Load image into Gallery viewer, Antennas Direct VHF / UHF Antenna Combiner, Indoor, Attic, Outdoor Use, All-weather Mounting Hardware, Adjustable Mast Clamp, Black - EU385CF-1S
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Antennas Direct VHF / UHF Antenna Combiner, Indoor, Attic, Outdoor Use, All-weather Mounting Hardware, Adjustable Mast Clamp, Black - EU385CF-1S
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Antennas Direct VHF / UHF Antenna Combiner, Indoor, Attic, Outdoor Use, All-weather Mounting Hardware, Adjustable Mast Clamp, Black - EU385CF-1S
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Antennas Direct VHF / UHF Antenna Combiner, Indoor, Attic, Outdoor Use, All-weather Mounting Hardware, Adjustable Mast Clamp, Black - EU385CF-1S
Vendor
Antennas Direct

Antennas Direct VHF / UHF Antenna Combiner, Indoor, Attic, Outdoor Use, All-weather Mounting Hardware, Adjustable Mast Clamp, Black - EU385CF-1S

4.0
Regular price
€80,00
Sale price
€80,00
Regular price
€132,00
Sold out
Unit price
per 
Save 39% (€52,00)
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  • Tracked Shipping on All Orders
  • 14 Days Returns

Description

  • Merge the signals from a UHF antenna with the signal from a VHF antenna through one coaxial cable
  • Perfect for applications requiring single band antennas
  • All-weather Housing protects connections from corrosion
  • Includes UHF/VHF combiner (diplexer), all-weather Housing and mounting hardware
  • 90 day warranty on parts

Shipping and Returns

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  • All customers are entitled to a return window of 14 days, starting from the date of delivery of the product(s).
  • Customers are advised to read our return policy for details of the return process, eligibility, refunds as well as cancellations or exchanges.
  • In case of any issues or concerns about Shipping or Returns, please contact us and we will be happy to help.

Customer Reviews

If you know what this - is and its what you want - it will definitely do the job.Even with Digital TV, stations are still using the VHF and UHF frequencies to transmit their signals. World of difference between them. You really need two different elements in your antenna to get all of them. This 'combiner' allows you to combine a VHF and a UHF feed into one source for your TV. It takes the signal from the long skinny (VHF) antenna and the signal from the curly (UHF) antenna to create a full range of Over The Air TV for you. Just mix in pointing the antenna in the proper direction and adding a proper (usually a pre- ) amplifier and you can get 1, 2, 3 or more dozen TV stations. (I get 36 at the moment) This can be an important part of your antenna package whether indoor (me in my condo) or outdoor variety). BTW it comes with an outdoor plastic housing and mounting hardware which I tossed.5Impressed with VHI-HI Reception CapabilityWe had one VHF-HI 216 Mhz channel, the only ABC affiliate, that we could not receive in the summertime (increased foliage) with the most of the typical compact antennas on the market, even if they were placed on roof outside (I tried various antennas with amplifiers including the Clearstream 4). Most of the combined VHF/UHF antennas have low < 2.5 dBi gain on the VHF bands and are optimized for high gain in the UHF bands. The 7.6 dBi gain of this antenna, given the compact size is impressive. It works for us to pull in the 216 Mhz channel even within our attic, saving the space needed for a huge 7 to 10' yagi style antenna, and eliminating the frustration and safety concern (lightning) of mounting an antenna outside on the roof. I assembled, tested, and mounted this unit in the attic within 15 mins. I was lucky the UHF stations are close enough that this is the only antenna I needed (it has lower 4.9 gain in the UHF bands). For those that need high UHF gain, consider the Clearstream 5 used with a UHF only antenna and a UHF/VHF low loss signal combiner/diplexer like the Clipsal 3105. Good luck OTAers!5ClearStream 5 pulls in missing VHF hi channelsWe live in northern Westchester County, NY, 40+ miles from NYC transmitters. We "cut the cord" about three years ago when our combined phone, internet, and cable TV bill exceeded $200/mo. At that point, we installed an attic antenna VHF/UHF nominally designed for > 75 miles. Until this year, we have had no trouble pulling in the OTA channels we wanted to watch, including WNET, the PBS channel in NYC. However starting in May 2016 WNET and WPIX became increasingly hard to watch until roughly 10 days ago, we got no signal at all. We tried lots re-positioning, added a second VHF antenna with a signal combiner, etc. No joy. The only plausible explanations seemed to be that both stations (which broadcast in the VHF hi frequency range, at low power, from the same mast) had somehow altered their transmission or that trees with particularly lush foliage were blocking the low power signals from those two channels which had gotten through in prior years.After talking to a broadcast technician at WPIX on Tuesday to confirm they had made no changes, I decided to try a new antenna, optimized for the high end of VHF (7-13), since the two stations in question broadcast on RF channels 11 and 13. Not too many manufacturers make VHF antennas any more and a lot of those that make antennas make outrageous claims which lead to disappointment. But the ClearStream 5 seemed to get OK reviews, so we decided to try it. It came today.It took maybe 10 minutes to assemble and with some skepticism I took it to the attic. I hooked it up, aimed it, and ten minutes later we had our two missing channels back!Nothing is better than a problem solved. Now we can watch our favorite shows again.5It finally solved my problem! I live a mere 10 miles from all the major network towers in Los Angeles, so I originally purchased the Winegard HD7694P believing this would be enough for my needs. However, upon mounting it, I did a serious double-take when I found that I couldn't pull in a single VHF station. Turns out my line of sight to Mt. Wilson was blocked by a series of smaller mountains I hadn't noticed, transforming my once "ideal" location into a fringe reception nightmare.After experimenting with a series of signal amplifiers and swapping in an Antennas Direct DB4 to solve my UHF woes, I finally broke down and bought this unit to address my lingering VHF inadequacies.I couldn't be more impressed with this antenna. Upon initial installation, I was able to pick up all four of my VHF stations, two of them perfectly. A few minor adjustments to the positioning brought in the other two just as well. I even managed to pull in two extra stations from San Diego, which is 75+ miles to the South. I was also able to get away with mounting this inside the attic, which was a big plus since it is larger and a bit more unsightly than the DB4's I have on the roof.This antenna is fantastically engineered and I would highly recommend it for anyone having difficulty pulling in VHF stations. If this antenna doesn't solve your problem, then I doubt any other product will.The only "con" I found with this item was that there were some obvious grammatical and spelling errors on the outside of the box. Maybe the engineers did the packaging too? 5For anyone who's ClearStream 5 'suddenly' quit working!Like many people have said here, antenna worked great and suddenly stopped. Chances are this is due to a poor design, but can be easily fixed by anyone with basic skills and a $5 part. The most likely cause of is the connection of the coaxial to the fragile circuit board in the black box. Mine cracked simply by moving the antenna around during installation to determine the best spot.To fix, remove the 4 screws from the connection box to remove one half. There will then be two nuts that hold the board connection to the antenna and the second half of the box in place. At this point, you'll be able to see the tiny solder connection holding the coax connector in place that mostly likely broke. Go ahead and remove the board & connector. Then throw it in the trash and then mutter to yourself about the high price and stupid design.The board can be replaced by using a 300/75 coaxial connector you can pick up anywhere for <$5. Reassemble the half box with the studs through the antenna & attach the connector leads using the existing nuts. I used a few washers with mine to help give a better assembly and the picture is attached. Attach the other half of the box with the four screws.Mine was mounted in the attic, so I didn't bother re-using the bottom plastic portion. However if yours is outdoors you'll probably want to pass the connector wires through there & seal up the hole with your choice of tape, silicon, foam, or anything else to keep the spiders & moisture out. If it's mounted outside, you may even want to put the whole connector in the box to avoid exposure or even add some extra tape/zip ties to re-enforce. Either way, it'll give you a much longer life than the original design.I hope that helps a few people out there if you're a DIY'er like me. Overall good antenna and it does it's job in a really compact design (for a VHF). Unfortunately a really poor design limits it's durability. That's too bad when you're paying a premium price for such a product. That's why I could only give it 2 stars. Good Luck fellow cord cutters!2Low Loss UHF/VHF combiner used to combine UHF DB8e and Deep Fringe Yagi antennas A very low loss UHF/VHF combiner. While I don't have the technical means to validate their specs, subjectively and experientially, this product works very well, and is very well made. I could not be more pleased with this product. I'm using it to combine the outputs of my Antennas Direct DB8e UHF and Stellar Labs deep fringe VHF antennas. The output of the combiner goes into a Winegard LN-200 Booster Preamplifier. 5This unit works very well - - impressive!!I thought I'd try this gadget on my outdoor tv antenna, which is up on a hill about 200 feet above my house. Most of my stations are from a Southern direction, but one I wanted badly was S.W. and it wouldn't come in that well sometimes since the antenna is pointed South. I added a good UHF reflector-type antenna to the same mast with my huge VHF antenna, turned the UHF toward the S.W. station, hooked them both to this combiner, and reattached the coax lead to the house. Surprisingly, I found that most all stations increased in strength a bit, and the one station I wanted in the S.W. comes in good and strong now. I figured that I would lose a little with both hooked to one lead, but apparently this thing works very well, and has little if any loss. I did make both jumper leads to the combiner from the two antennas the exact same length, as to keep things in phase. I certainly would recommend this to anyone who has a need to combine two antennas if your signals come from two different directions. A nifty little gadget here. Comes sealed from the elements in a hard bakelite case, while the unit itself is a sealed module that fits snuggly inside. It clamps to your mast pole with the included U-bolt. Great product that actually works.5MEASURED to be actually performing well, test results attached.Sometimes a product exceeds your expectations, and this is one of those times. I'm fairly specialized in RF (radio) engineering and when another reviewer posted technical details (network analyzer plots) I was surprised to see such good performance - almost to the point that it was hard to believe. So I bought one and repeated the measurements, and to my surprise I could mostly replicate them.The summary: this thing works actually very well for a $20 consumer grade product. The loss in-band is very low, and the rejection out-of-band is pretty high - exactly what you want.Most reviews of antenna parts are qualitative in nature, from well-meaning people who slap things onto their roofs, but have no idea what they are talking about or if their experience is representative for others. So you can sell someone a piece of garbage, and 9 out of 10 people would not be able to tell. This thing does not fall under that category - hat off to the seller.I'll attach my plots too, for the other nerds who are equally hard to convince as myself. I calibrated the VNA with 50 ohm standards, because that is what I have, so there will be some sub-dB inaccuracies - but they don't materially affect the results.5What I needed to combine my two antenna signals.Bought this to combine the Clearstream DB4 UHF antenna and Clearstream 5 VHF antenna. Previously I had the small add on VHF antenna for the DB4 but it just wasn't good enough for my attic installation. Now I get all the channels in UHF and VHF very strongly. In my cast all the broadcast towers are in a town 27 miles away so I just need to point the antennae in that direction. The signal goes from this combiner to a preamp and then a distribution amplifier to provide TV to all the rooms in my house and shed.5My FrankentseinMy Frankenstein******** My Setup is Marked Below for Quick Reference ********I live in Palm Bay, Florida (South East of Orlando) and wanted to drop cable, the phone line and keep the internet. I have a pretty high expectation of what I want from my OTA Antenna setup. I want ABC, CBS, NBC and FOX. I want my NFL games and the good Prime Time shows these stations provide. But I do not live in or close to a city and I want to run four tv s off of my ota setup. So I picked up the "ViewTV Outdoor Amplified Digital HDTV Antenna - 150 Mile Range antenna", (Another antenna here on Amazon) based upon reviews and its range. I put it up in the attic and I faced it towards the Orlando towers to the North West. I got around 40-46 channels depending on fidgeting around with this directional antenna. I am 50 - 60 miles from the main channels I wanted to get; ABC, CBS, NBC and FOX. When I first setup this antenna, out of these four, I initially picked up ABC, CBS and NBC. FOX was nowhere to be found. ABC and CBS came in great and NBC had a poor signal.I moved the "ViewTV antenna" around, I lost NBC and I continued to move this directional antenna around for days and I never got a signal from FOX and NBC's signal never came back. I did still get a lot of channels with this antenna. So I decided to do some more research (Note, this is a UHF [Ultra High Frequency] and a VHF [Very High Frequency] Directional Antenna) with hopes I could improve my channel count and the signal strength. After weeks of reading tech blogs, antenna installation webpages, dish Installation blogs, websites of knowledgeable people, reading and researching how to understand TVFOOLs website and various other free websites where you plug in your location and get your signal readout, I realized the common theme. Everyone's situation is unique and each person builds their own Frankenstein monster and compares notes. Furthermore, keep your receipts so you can return what doesn't work.Gear InformationAfter this research I understood the difference between Single Directional, Multi-Directional and Omni-Directional Antennas, Indoor/Outdoor Antennas, when and how to Ground Properly, changes in local code through the years on grounding, what is a Preamplifier, which ones are good for certain situations and when you should use a Distribution Amplifier in conjunction with a PreAmp. When considering having two antennas combined, never use a splitter get a coupler/combiner, buy new quad shield coaxial cable with solid copper cores to run throughout your home, do not have too much excess coaxial cable between your connections and ports/devices, buy a set of tools so you can cut your own coaxial cable to proper lengths and get F Connectors to properly terminate your ends after cutting.Now, this is important, all of the free Antenna Websites where you plug in your address and they give you a graph of your location and the towers around you, I did not get a specification (or I never noticed them) of which specific tower was a UHF Tower or a VHF Tower. But I eventually did find one website that did specify the frequency of each Tower. Antennas Direct (they sell various antennas and the gear to go along) has a location finder, or what they call a Transmitter Locator . Plug in your address and it gives you your Towers and Signals read out like TVFool and the rest, but they give you each towers frequency too. This is how I found out my NBC Station Tower was running on VHF .Note: Some of these Couplers/Combiners/Joiners have 2 ports in and one port out, with 1 port IN on the left side stating UHF and the 2 port IN on the right side stating VHF . This means that only Ultra High Frequencies will be received on the port on the left side, while the other, right side port states it will only take Very High Frequencies. They will then combine a UHF Antenna signals to anther VHF Antenna and its signals to the out port. I have read that very few today can take a UHF/VHF Antenna on each side and join their signals together. I could not find one that was clearly stated for this purpose, but I did find one that was commented on as being able to run a UHF/VHF Antenna on both side ports IN .Grounding InformationWhen grounding the Coaxial Cable outside, do not get a Grounding Block, get a Lightning Surge Protector instead. You are going to ground both outside in your cable box to your homes copper grounding rod in the ground (outside you should see your cable companies green coated copper wire going from the cable box into the ground to the grounding rod), the difference is the LSP has better protection from surges. If you are going with an outside antenna, the Antenna Mass must be grounded too. It must have a grounding rod connected to it no more than 20 feet away. So if your antenna is on one side of the home and the grounding rod is on the other, you must install a new grounding rod to meet this requirement, here where I am, it can be fully buried. It Must have 6 awg or thicker copper wire attached to the grounding rod via a grounding rod clamp. Then you must run the 6 awg (4 awg is thicker and preferred more often) copper line to the homes main grounding rod and clamped Bonded there. The industry uses the term Bonded/Bonding in reference to clamping the copper wire to the grounding rod. Also my current code says to have the Grounding Rods separated by a distance of twice the size of the grounding rod, 8 feet apart for a 4 foot rod, 16 feet apart for an 8 foot rod etc.ConclusionAfter all this I found my Frankenstein I wanted to build. I decided to begin my trial and error process with two antennas, a coupler/combiner, a preamp, a lightning surge protector and a distribution amplifier. I bought a second antenna, the DB8e Bowtie. That antenna is from the Antennas Direct company I spoke of before (the Transmitter Locator with the UHF and VHF Tower specificity). I had called and spoke with a lady there (an American company and an American Customer Service Line too, no foreign customer service people). She saw my location and their Transmitter Locator too as we talked. She asked if I am going indoor or outdoor, I told her in the attic; she suggested the two most expensive antennas of course, the DB8E Bowtie Antenna for the range/distance for UHF and combine it with the Clearstream 5 Antenna for the VHF . They have a 90 day return policy if bought directly from them. But I bought a DB8e Bowtie UHF from my local Walmart for two reasons, A) I can inspect this costly Antenna at the store as I pick it up, B) Walmart has a decent return policy.I got the DB8e home, set it up and coupled it with the ViewTV Outdoor Amplified Digital Antenna and I got 46 channels, and most importantly I got FOX. I now have FOX. I know some people near me that can t get FOX no matter what they do. They don t think about it anymore and they gave up on obtaining the FOX signal. But I got it. Since this DB8e UHF Antenna gave me a channel this current antenna never could (FOX), and other people can t get this channel with their setup, I was impressed, with this company and with their equipment. Since I was impressed with the DB8e Bowtie, I ordered the Antennas Direct VHF ClearStream 5 Antenna (from AMAZON) that the saleslady suggested. I disconnected the ViewTV Outdoor Amplified antenna from the coupler and added the Clearstream5 VHF Antenna with the Db8e Bowtie; I now get 54 channels including ABC, CBS, NBC, FOX, CW, ION channels, PBS channels, movies channels and more. My channel signals are also stronger. Granted the ota channels are mostly different than what one gets from cable, such as FX, SyFy, History channel etcetera. Those channels I do not get from ota. But for a $150 savings a month, one way or another I can stream those channels.******** MY BUILD ********Short VersionAntennas x2 > Combiner > preamp > coax to outside cable box > Surge protector > coax back into the attic > distribution amplifier/splitter > coax to 4 tvsActual Products Listed Below********** (Antenna 1) DB8e Bowtie + (Antenna 2) Clearstream5 > Winegard CC-7870 Antenna Coupler > Winegard LNA 200 Preamp > TII 212 Broadband Cable TV and Satellite Lightning Surge Protector 75 Ohm 5-1500MHz > PCT 4 Port Cable TV/HDTV/Digital Distribution Amplifier **********Note: The PCT 4 Port Distribution Amplifier I chose has 4 tv ports, therefore I do not need a splitter to support the four tv s, just this Dist. Amp.5Works great for distant VHF channels. Just OK for distant UHF channels. No VHF/UHF combiner in the box.I bought this ClearStream 5 to replace an old fashioned multiple element periodic antenna that I had thrown up in my attic when I cut the cord a couple of years ago. The majority of our stations are 45 miles due west and we live in a the woods, so we had frequent drop outs, especially when it rained. I put this in the attic a few feet over from where the other antenna was and immediately go much better reception on our VHF channels. One channel went from 80% to 100% and another went from 60% to 80%. The UHF reception, however, was worse across the board. We lost two channels completely and several others dropped significantly in quality. The only UHF channel that was as good or better was the one channel that is significantly closer than the other towers (15 miles). This was pretty much as expected based on the description of the antenna.I also purchased a db8e, intending to use that for UHF and the ClearStream 5 for VHF, as several other reviewers had suggested. Unfortunately, the ClearStream 5 did not come with the UHF/VHF combiner that was mentioned in the product description, so I will need to order one before I can try this arrangement. I am hoping that this combination will give me improved reception across the board. I will update this review when I am able to complete the setup.4it does have dipole like UHF reception which I used for my very close ... This antenna worked extremely well in San Diego, south side of El Cajon. This is a difficult area as all stations come from two antenna farms located about 115 degrees apart with hills and trees (effectively west and south). The south antennas are very close (all are UHF only), with multi-path being a problem. The west antennas are 1Edge and VHF only. Although this antenna should be considered primarily for VHF reception, it does have dipole like UHF reception which I used for my very close UHF stations. The wide reception pattern of this antenna allowed me to point it between the two antenna farms and receive all of the wanted VHF and UHF stations from a single position (no rotor needed). Rooftop mounted with Kitz Tech KT-200 pre-amplifier, 150' of RG6 and four way splitter. After a week of viewing, the antenna is working very well pulling double duty, even pulling in the much further away 2Edge RF23 CW channel from Mexico. I continue to have periodic dropouts on RF40, I believe due to multi-path, but it's much improved over my DIY M4 mclapp 4-bay bowtie (without reflector). This antenna is super solidly built and should last a lifetime. It's also a more modern looking and condensed package if looks are a concern. 5Works fine, for a while...I purchased two of these. I bought the first one approximately two years ago, and it failed in about a year. While it worked, it seemed to do the job fairly well. When it failed, our TV reception dropped from about 15 channels down to the three strongest.I purchased the second one to replace the (now defective) first one, thinking perhaps the failure was a fluke or created by extraordinary circumstances. However, the second one failed in about the same time period (right around a year).While the antenna combiner is effective when it is functioning properly, and I can certainly afford $30 per year to buy a new unit for better TV reception, I don't feel like getting out the giant extension ladder to climb the roof every year to replace the unit.3
Antennas Direct VHF / UHF Antenna Combiner, Indoor, Attic, Outdoor Use, All-weather Mounting Hardware, Adjustable Mast Clamp, Black - EU385CF-1S

Antennas Direct VHF / UHF Antenna Combiner, Indoor, Attic, Outdoor Use, All-weather Mounting Hardware, Adjustable Mast Clamp, Black - EU385CF-1S

4.0
Error You can't add more than 500 quantity.
Regular price
€80,00
Sale price
€80,00
Regular price
€132,00
Sold out
Unit price
per 
Save 39% (€52,00)