• Actiontec Bonded MoCA 2.0 Ethernet to Coax Adapter, 2 Pack (ECB6200K02), Black
  • Actiontec Bonded MoCA 2.0 Ethernet to Coax Adapter, 2 Pack (ECB6200K02), Black
  • Actiontec Bonded MoCA 2.0 Ethernet to Coax Adapter, 2 Pack (ECB6200K02), Black
  • Actiontec Bonded MoCA 2.0 Ethernet to Coax Adapter, 2 Pack (ECB6200K02), Black
  • Actiontec Bonded MoCA 2.0 Ethernet to Coax Adapter, 2 Pack (ECB6200K02), Black
Actiontec Bonded MoCA 2.0 Ethernet to Coax Adapter, 2 Pack (ECB6200K02), Black
Actiontec Bonded MoCA 2.0 Ethernet to Coax Adapter, 2 Pack (ECB6200K02), Black
Actiontec Bonded MoCA 2.0 Ethernet to Coax Adapter, 2 Pack (ECB6200K02), Black
Actiontec Bonded MoCA 2.0 Ethernet to Coax Adapter, 2 Pack (ECB6200K02), Black
Actiontec Bonded MoCA 2.0 Ethernet to Coax Adapter, 2 Pack (ECB6200K02), Black

Actiontec Bonded MoCA 2.0 Ethernet to Coax Adapter, 2 Pack (ECB6200K02), Black

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  • Enhance your home's Wi-Fi network with the speed and reliability of a wired network.Compatible with Cable TV:This MoCA Network Adapter is designed specifically for homes with Cable TV and is compatible with virtually any device that has an Ethernet port, including Blu-ray, Xbox 360, PS3, streaming media devices, computers and more. It does not support homes with satellite TV
  • Speeds up to 1 Gbps, perfect for delivering pristine Over-the-Top HD video to the home theater
  • Works over the home's existing coaxial wiring. MoCA Certified
  • Bonded MoCA 2.0 with backward compatibility to MoCA 1.1
  • NETWORK SIZE: Up to 16 Devices (including NC)
  • Notes-also suitable for operation with fios network. Depending on the length of the coax cable there might be need of a signal booster
  • Will not interfere with cable TV services or other home devices

Customer Reviews

These hate RG59, unfortunately Actiontec did not mention run limits or coax requirements. $300 down the drain. I bought 4 of these to serve Interwebz to a few entertainment centers. My house is big and even with repeaters, 802.11AC only runs around 30Mb so I was hoping to get better from these. Unfortunately, these will not sync at all over RG59. I even put an adapter in the JBox which runs directly to the rooms I need to service and no coax light. The only room I could get a light was served by a single 50ft run of RG6QS. Note that I do not run anything over my coax. HSI is CAT6 from the ONT and my Dish Network service runs on its own RG6 directly to the STBs, so this RG59 is supposedly clean. I also tried terminating any open wall ports and still no light.So 3 star in that the 4 units I bought were not DOA and would work if I had RG6, but Actiontec should mention run length limits and that these will not sync with RG59 unless they runs are REALLY short. 3A MUST have if you live in an apartment and want 4k streaming This device makes Netflix amazing in 4k. My apartment complex simply has too many different Wi-Fi networks, and the density causes them to slow each other down. Watching 4k Netflix was pretty much impossible over wi-fi, but with this I never have to worry. This model is better than the other Actiontec version because I can do 1 gig, the other is slower.Important notes:-You also need to buy and install a MoCa friendly splitter, and a MoCa filter. -Without the right splitter, the MoCa devices will not be able to talk to each other and will be useless. -Without the filter you neighbors will be able to steal your data. The filter goes on the port of the splitter that connects to the outside. 5Setting up a MOCA internet network with an OTA antenna (No cable TV) over coax cables. See my image for my detailed setup.I researched for hours online trying to figure out how to set up cable internet with MoCA and OTA (over the air) antenna but never got any clear answers. I saw many diagrams but none fit my setup or explained it well. So I spent hours trying many different configurations and figure out some details.First, here is a list of the inputs I was trying to network/route:- Internet only from provider Comcast (NO cable TV)- MoCA- OTA antennaI have ONLY internet coming from the provider into my house (I have no channels coming through cable TV). My router and cable modem are on the second floor with my computer but I wanted to have wired internet for all my streaming devices in the basement. Also, I wanted to use an OTA antenna but the TV (TiVo) was in the basement and I had better reception with the antenna on the second floor. I am renting the house and it only has Coax cables running through the house so I had to do this with only the Coax cables that were installed.What I discovered from my experimenting and what was not mentioned on any forums is the following: The Comcast internet signal (internet only from my provider) coming into my house shared a similar frequency as the OTA antenna. I could not have both of these signals crossing the same coax cable at the same time. The MoCA network signal and Comcast internet signal could exist on the same coax cable (which is required for setting up the MoCA).So I first set up the MoCA network. I now had the MoCA network signal (which contains the internet) AND the Comcast internet signal (internet only, no cable TV signal) on the Coax cable network.I then wanted to send only the MoCA network and the OTA signal to my TV (TiVo box). This is only possible if I remove the Comcast internet signal and replace it with the OTA signal. So I used a diplexer to solve this problem. I took one of the Coax cables coming from the splitter (see diagram) which contained both the MoCA and Comcast internet signal and plugged it into the SAT input of the diplexer. What this does is removed the Comcast internet signal and allow only the MoCA signal to pass through. Next, I connect the OTA antenna to the VHF/UHF input of the same diplexer. There is now a combined signal of the MoCA and OTA antenna going out of the diplexer. Run a coax cable from the output of the diplexer to the input of the MoCA device. Now you have the OTA signal coming out of the coax on the MoCA adapter and internet coming out of the ethernet port of the MoCA adapter.Again, let me state this clearly. If you have Cable TV coming from your provider this will NOT work. This will work if you are receiving ONLY internet from your provider.My setup (see image):Antenna: ClearStream Eclipse Amplified Indoor HDTV Antenna with Sure Grip Technology - 50 Mile RangeMoCA: Actiontec Bonded MoCA 2.0 Ethernet to Coax Adapter (ECB6200S02)Diplexer: Pack of 2- Holland Dishpro Satellite Diplexer - Dish Approved 2 amp versionSplitter: BAMF 4-Way Coax Cable Splitter Bi-Directional MoCA 5-2300MHzSwitch: NETGEAR 8-Port Gigabit Ethernet 10/100/1000Mbps Switch (GS308)POE: Filter, MoCA "POE" Filter for Cable TV Coaxial Networking ONLYRouter: ASUS (RT-AC68U) Wireless-AC1900 Dual-Band Gigabit RouterModem: ARRIS SURFboard SB6141 DOCSIS 3.0 Cable Modem - Retail Packaging - White 5A bit pricey. Great performance with easy setup! I recently moved my computer to another part of the house where hardlining it to the router isn't an option. I really didn't want to go wireless so I dug up my old Powerline adapters. My internet speeds are typically 350mbps down and 25mbps up. With the Powerline adapters I got only about 1/5th of that presumably because of the older wiring in my house. This also included frequent disconnects and poor latency. That's when I remembered MoCA.Pulled the trigger on these bad boys and I've been happy since. I'm getting full download and upload speeds just as if I were hardlined directly to the router with Cat5/6. Setup was easy, literally plug and play. There is a GUI for these things but it shouldn't be necessary to access as they shipped to me with the latest firmware. No random disconnection issues and no speed degradation to report after about a week of use. I will state, however, that these adapters add about 3ms of latency between you and the router. Not a huge deal but some people are anal about that kind of thing.These could definitely be cheaper, but for the performance, I can't really complain too much. I will say that you DEFINITELY need to grab a POE filter to put on the line coming into the house to block any of your traffic from making it to your neighbors, as well as some MoCA compatible splitters depending on how everything in your home is wired. 5Fast and Reliable I purchased my first pair a year ago. I'm very happy with their performance and reliability. They never give me any troubles. The connection speed is supper fast. In my configuration, I can top the speed at 900+Mbps in iperf3 tests.I heard there was a connectivity issue in its firmware. When the first pair arrived, I flushed their firmware to 2.11.1.10.6200.1 immediately. I never observe the issue with this firmware version.To cover all rooms of my house, I just purchased the 2nd pair. The adapters arrived with a newer firmware 2.11.1.50.6200.7. They work great together with the old adapters. But I thought it is a good idea to make all my 4 in sync, so that I sent a customer service request to Actiontec via email. They responded quickly with a new firmware 2.11.1.50.6200.727 and installation instructions embedded.Then I made a mistake: since the firmware Actiontec sent to me has a higher number, I flushed all my 4 ECB6200s. It turns out that actually the new pair has a different hardware version. The old adapters work well with the latest firmware, but the new adapters were very unstable.Then I contacted Actiontec again. They were very responsive. They realized the issue immediately and sent me 2.11.1.50.6200.7. Fortunately the pair was not bricked. After applying this version, they just came back to normal.1. There are at least 2 different types of ECB6200. One is with solid cover on its back, has hardware version 2A. The other has vent cover, version is 2C.2. Hardware 2A's latest firmware is 2.11.1.50.6200.727; Hardware 2C's latest firmware is 2.11.1.50.6200.73. You can submit service request to get the latest firmware.4. Actiontec's customer service is responsive and professional.Overall I'm satisfied with my ECB6200s. The only drawback, or say minor issue, is that its latency is slightly higher than Ethernet cable: 3~5ms vs almost 0ms in PING. I think it is acceptable. 5USE THIS TO REPLACE YOUR VERIZON FIOS ROUTER Actiontec Bonded MoCA 2.0 Ethernet to Coax Adapter (ECB6200S02) The main reason I bought this product was to get rid of my Verizon Quantum Gateway Router. I recently upgraded my Verizon internet to their "Gigabit" plan which they run a cat6 cable from the ONT directly to the router. This means if you are on the internet only plan, you can use any router you like.Recently I upgrade my router to the Netgear Nighthawk X10 router and it was plug and play, no config needed. Since I do have a cable box this did require me to use the Quantum router as a bridge to still provide the STB with internet. NOT ANYMORE.With this adapter, I was able to completely remove the Verizon Quantum router from the loop and not use it at all. What you need to do follows:1. Configure the MOCA bridge as Amin M. Astaneh said in another review To do so you will need to connect to the devices one by one over Ethernet: * manually configure your interface for 192.168.144.2, netmask 255.255.255.0, gateway 192.168.144.1 * plug your computer directly into the adapter using an ethernet cable * connect to 192.168.144.30 in your browser * go to Configuration and change the RF channel to a different value. I believe I used value 1600. You can also take the opportunity to set a new PSK to encrypt the traffic being exchanged on the MOCA network. You will know that the procedure was successful if: * the adapters still display green link lights when plugged into coax; * the Verizon router does not show the Actiontec devices as DHCP clients. These devices are an excellent option if Powerline isn't working for you and your house is wired with coax. see less2. Plug your Ethernet into your WAN port on your new 3rd party router ( might have to do a DHCP release to get this working, I did not)3. On the Coax port labeled "Coax IN" plug the coax cable into the bridge that is coming to from the ONT box.4. On the Coax port labeled " TV/STB Out" plug the coax cable into the bridge that is coming directly from your STB.5. Plug an Ethernet cable into a LAN port from your 3rd party router into the bridge. At this point, you should now have the Coax and Power light on the MOCA bridge lit up.6. reboot your STB(s) ( I only had one but this should also work if you have multiple STB's in a loop).After this, you should have your STB rebooted and working fully ( minus the caller ID on your TV for any landlines, I don't use this feature so I cannot speak to this functionality but this is what I have read from other sources. Take it with a grain of salt).I cannot speak for the reliability of the Actiontec MOCA bridge just yet but What I do know that it is working as is intended running NO Verizon hardware ( with the exception of the STB.) I will update this review after 90 days or so to speak to this portion, but for now, it gets 5 stars! Stay tuned. 5Was initially unable to get it to work properly but eventually figured it out! So far, I have been unable to get it to work properly with my Comcast triple play X1 service. Internet speed is extremely variable, internet connects but cuts off for several seconds frequently. Not sure if these issues are related to the Actiontec adapters themselves, my Comcast service or the wiring inside my house. Will update this review if and when I am able to figure it out. So far, neither Actiontec nor Comcast support have been very helpful.Am updating my review and changing it to 5 stars after I figured out how to get this adapter, and two others I bought separately, to work properly. Turned out that the Actiontec adapters were not the problem and that it was an amplifier that Comcast had installed at my point of entry into the house was incompatible with MoCa and that is what was causing the Actiontec adapters to malfunction. Comcast had no clue and was totally unable to help with anything but I eventually figured this out by trial and error and purchased a MoCa compatible amplifier from Amazon (see included link for the model I purchased) to replace the one that Comcast had installed. Once I did that the Actiontec's have performed flawlessly and we now have by far the best internet coverage all over our house since we first got Comcast service here way back in the 1990's. We now have internet strength and speeds in various parts of the house where the Actiontec adapters have been installed that are exactly the same as those available at the main Comcast router.This MoCa technology is awesome and given most homes have coax cables already installed in many rooms, offers a superb and reasonably inexpensive solution in addressing weak or non existent internet service in various parts of homes that so many people face. It is really a shame that not many people know about it. Only advice to potential buyers is that you will need a direct coax line from the point of entry to the house, or from the amplifier located at that point of entry, to the room/outlet that you want to install the adapters. If there are splitters in between, particularly splitters that are not MoCa compliant, the adapters may not function properly.Highly recommend these adapters and have already convinced other family members to get some for their own homes that they have noow done and are also very pleased with.PCT 8 Port Cable TV Splitter Signal Booster/Amplifier with Active Return Zero Signal Loss and Integrated MoCA Filter 5Flawless 4k steaming; Nearly gigabit speeds; Amazing! I'm going to focus my review on some of the questions I had before purchasing. For some context, I have comcast 200 megabit download, 10 megabit upload. I purchased this product to get a wired connection from my NAS to my nvidia shield on my TV for video streaming, as well as a wired internet connection in another room across the house. For both applications, wifi would have been a major performance hit. I am only running through about 30 feet of RG6 coax.My setup involved replacing my 2 way splitter with a 4 way. This caused some loss of power, however the signal at my house is very good and comcast had installed a "pad" that reduced the power so all I had to do was remove the pad to make my signal normal. I was able to verify this through my SB6183 modem login screen.The first question I had when I purchased this was how it would work with the coax passed through the device to the modem, as there is only one coax wall outlet where my modem is located. It works perfectly, I was pleasantly surprised. I was worried the power would be reduced further like a second splitter or it wouldn't work at all, but neither is the case. Works great.The second question I had (which was answered by other reviews but hard for me to believe) was the performance. To my amazement, they perform just as well as a gigabit ethernet cable with the exception of a couple MS of lag. No big deal. Wired my speed test shows 28ms, and through the MOCA adapter it is 30ms. The speed is nearly identical. Im talking identical user experience to using an ethernet cable. I transferred a file from my NAS and it was gigabit speed.I am able to stream 4k content from my NAS on my nvidia shield TV now; something I was not able to do previously.You will need a POE filter for this at the point where the internet enters your house to prevent it "backflowing" through the cable into your neighborhood. Costs $10 and I already had one from the previous home owners having a DVR system that needed one (probably because it also used MOCA).I have tested twitch steaming and gaming through these devices and they work just as well as ethernet. The extra 2-3ms lag is virtually insignificant. You wouldn't know its there without the numbers to confirm it.Too long; don't read:Excellent, almost identical to gigabit performance. Modem can be passed through the device with no power loss. 1ghz splitters are fine, at least for me. Get a POE filter. 5Ethernet via Coax setup with no cable connection Had I listened to the helpdesk at Actiontec, I wouldn't have had this today. We have a residential fiber network (AT&T Gigapower), similar to Google Fiber in RTP. The ONT (Optical Network Terminal) has an ethernet out that goes into the AT&T Router. We have been cable-free for some time and hence the cable lines have remained unused. The ground floor is where the router is located. The first floor has coax outlets in all the rooms but no ethernet outputs and as a consequence, we were stuck with having a Gigabit ethernet that only worked in a single room. We use Apple Extreme as the router (in Bridge mode) which helped (802.11ac since AT&T limits their Wi-Fi to 300 Mbps) but as the ~ gigabit speed is only available via the 5 Ghz connection, the strength quickly drops over a distance. I called Actiontec and they advised that if I didn't have "Cable Modem" it won't work. I saw the videos on Youtube and the support documentation which did not ask for a Cable Modem. You'd think that Actiontec - as the manufacturer would know what they are selling but evidently doesn't. It is a shame considering that the product is very capable.I took some notes as I set up my environment which I have provided below --Items Actiontec Bonded Moca 2.0 Adapters (2) Coaxial Cable Stripper (Can use any ordinary wire cutter) 4 X 1 Coaxial Splitter Coaxial ConnectorsSteps1) Connect Actiontec Adapter 1 in the room (Living Room) with the router2) In the cable box, connect coax outlet from Living Room to the other coaxial cables where you want to provide Ethernet connectivity3) Connect adapter in other rooms where the coax was connected to (from 2)Notes: If the coax cables in the cable box do not have connectors, use a coax stripper to attach connectors (sold at Home Depot / Lowe s) The Coax indicator on the Actiontec adapter will light up only after a bi-directional connection has been established. This can take 15-30 seconds depending on your coax setup, etc I was able to obtain the advertised speeds after testing with iperf3 between 2 devices linked via Actiontec in different rooms In order to test whether your Actiontec kit is working, you can connect the Coax In connectors of each adapter together with a coax cable. Connect the Ethernet port of one adapter (say adapter 1) to the router and the Ethernet port of the other adapter (adapter 2) to a device. This should establish a link as follows Router -> Adapter1_Ethernet -> Adapter1_CoaxIn -> Adapter2_CoaxIn -> Adapter2_Ethernet -> Adapter2_Device_Connected_To_The_EthernetThis should light up the Coax indicators on both the adapters.-----Hope this helps. This is a very simple installation and just requires connecting wires together to make it work. I know there is quite a bit of confusion online over how it works. My situation was made simpler by the fact that I didn't have any cable connection and got to use the coax network solely for the purpose of making the ethernet network. The only challenge I had was making sure that the coax cables were connected to one another - when I initially did the setup it didn't work and this was because none of the wires were actually connected in the cable box. The Coax light also takes a few seconds to come on and it does so once a round-trip connection has been established - for those who have not been able to get this to work, I'd suggest trying the round-trip adapter <-> adapter test and if that works, then you may have an issue with the coax cables. Lastly, if you have several cable connections a coax connection tester (such as a coaxial tone tester from Holland) would help. If nothing works, get a cable guy to set up a connection similar to how I have shown it in the attached picture. Please feel free to let me know if there are any further improvements to this I could make. As my disclaimer -- These steps worked for me, but I don't know enough about coax/electrical/etc to say this it would work for everyone, so use your best judgment before purchasing the items. Thanks! 5Works well with Verizon FIOS (with special configs) The home I currently rent is not wired for ethernet. My office PC is upstairs, and the TV, servers, and Verizon MOCA router are downstairs in the living room. It's been a constant struggle to get gigabit speeds upstairs.I tried using two 802.11AC routers with a bridged connection. I experienced latency spikes and intermittent drops.Powerline caps out at 75Mbps on their gigabit-rated adapters.Once installed, these adapters supported a 750Mbps result using iperf. Finally, success!However, I learned that these by default will peer with the MOCA router provided by Verizon and totally mess up your network topology if you're not too careful, especially for people that isolate their network behind a custom router not provided by their ISP. This creates a race condition where either router will hand out a DHCP lease. The simplest solution is is to change the operating frequency of the MOCA adapters so they cannot communicate with the Verizon router.To do so you will need to connect to the devices one by one over Ethernet:* manually configure your interface for 192.168.144.2, netmask 255.255.255.0, gateway 192.168.144.1* plug your computer directly into the adapter using an ethernet cable* connect to 192.168.144.30 in your browser* go to Configuration and change the RF channel to a different value. I believe I used value 1600. You can also take the opportunity to set a new PSK to encrypt the traffic being exchanged on the MOCA network.You will know that the procedure was successful if:* the adapters still display green link lights when plugged into coax;* the Verizon router does not show the Actiontec devices as DHCP clients.These devices are an excellent option if Powerline isn't working for you and your house is wired with coax. 5
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Customer Reviews

These hate RG59, unfortunately Actiontec did not mention run limits or coax requirements. $300 down the drain. I bought 4 of these to serve Interwebz to a few entertainment centers. My house is big and even with repeaters, 802.11AC only runs around 30Mb so I was hoping to get better from these. Unfortunately, these will not sync at all over RG59. I even put an adapter in the JBox which runs directly to the rooms I need to service and no coax light. The only room I could get a light was served by a single 50ft run of RG6QS. Note that I do not run anything over my coax. HSI is CAT6 from the ONT and my Dish Network service runs on its own RG6 directly to the STBs, so this RG59 is supposedly clean. I also tried terminating any open wall ports and still no light.So 3 star in that the 4 units I bought were not DOA and would work if I had RG6, but Actiontec should mention run length limits and that these will not sync with RG59 unless they runs are REALLY short. 3A MUST have if you live in an apartment and want 4k streaming This device makes Netflix amazing in 4k. My apartment complex simply has too many different Wi-Fi networks, and the density causes them to slow each other down. Watching 4k Netflix was pretty much impossible over wi-fi, but with this I never have to worry. This model is better than the other Actiontec version because I can do 1 gig, the other is slower.Important notes:-You also need to buy and install a MoCa friendly splitter, and a MoCa filter. -Without the right splitter, the MoCa devices will not be able to talk to each other and will be useless. -Without the filter you neighbors will be able to steal your data. The filter goes on the port of the splitter that connects to the outside. 5Setting up a MOCA internet network with an OTA antenna (No cable TV) over coax cables. See my image for my detailed setup.I researched for hours online trying to figure out how to set up cable internet with MoCA and OTA (over the air) antenna but never got any clear answers. I saw many diagrams but none fit my setup or explained it well. So I spent hours trying many different configurations and figure out some details.First, here is a list of the inputs I was trying to network/route:- Internet only from provider Comcast (NO cable TV)- MoCA- OTA antennaI have ONLY internet coming from the provider into my house (I have no channels coming through cable TV). My router and cable modem are on the second floor with my computer but I wanted to have wired internet for all my streaming devices in the basement. Also, I wanted to use an OTA antenna but the TV (TiVo) was in the basement and I had better reception with the antenna on the second floor. I am renting the house and it only has Coax cables running through the house so I had to do this with only the Coax cables that were installed.What I discovered from my experimenting and what was not mentioned on any forums is the following: The Comcast internet signal (internet only from my provider) coming into my house shared a similar frequency as the OTA antenna. I could not have both of these signals crossing the same coax cable at the same time. The MoCA network signal and Comcast internet signal could exist on the same coax cable (which is required for setting up the MoCA).So I first set up the MoCA network. I now had the MoCA network signal (which contains the internet) AND the Comcast internet signal (internet only, no cable TV signal) on the Coax cable network.I then wanted to send only the MoCA network and the OTA signal to my TV (TiVo box). This is only possible if I remove the Comcast internet signal and replace it with the OTA signal. So I used a diplexer to solve this problem. I took one of the Coax cables coming from the splitter (see diagram) which contained both the MoCA and Comcast internet signal and plugged it into the SAT input of the diplexer. What this does is removed the Comcast internet signal and allow only the MoCA signal to pass through. Next, I connect the OTA antenna to the VHF/UHF input of the same diplexer. There is now a combined signal of the MoCA and OTA antenna going out of the diplexer. Run a coax cable from the output of the diplexer to the input of the MoCA device. Now you have the OTA signal coming out of the coax on the MoCA adapter and internet coming out of the ethernet port of the MoCA adapter.Again, let me state this clearly. If you have Cable TV coming from your provider this will NOT work. This will work if you are receiving ONLY internet from your provider.My setup (see image):Antenna: ClearStream Eclipse Amplified Indoor HDTV Antenna with Sure Grip Technology - 50 Mile RangeMoCA: Actiontec Bonded MoCA 2.0 Ethernet to Coax Adapter (ECB6200S02)Diplexer: Pack of 2- Holland Dishpro Satellite Diplexer - Dish Approved 2 amp versionSplitter: BAMF 4-Way Coax Cable Splitter Bi-Directional MoCA 5-2300MHzSwitch: NETGEAR 8-Port Gigabit Ethernet 10/100/1000Mbps Switch (GS308)POE: Filter, MoCA "POE" Filter for Cable TV Coaxial Networking ONLYRouter: ASUS (RT-AC68U) Wireless-AC1900 Dual-Band Gigabit RouterModem: ARRIS SURFboard SB6141 DOCSIS 3.0 Cable Modem - Retail Packaging - White 5A bit pricey. Great performance with easy setup! I recently moved my computer to another part of the house where hardlining it to the router isn't an option. I really didn't want to go wireless so I dug up my old Powerline adapters. My internet speeds are typically 350mbps down and 25mbps up. With the Powerline adapters I got only about 1/5th of that presumably because of the older wiring in my house. This also included frequent disconnects and poor latency. That's when I remembered MoCA.Pulled the trigger on these bad boys and I've been happy since. I'm getting full download and upload speeds just as if I were hardlined directly to the router with Cat5/6. Setup was easy, literally plug and play. There is a GUI for these things but it shouldn't be necessary to access as they shipped to me with the latest firmware. No random disconnection issues and no speed degradation to report after about a week of use. I will state, however, that these adapters add about 3ms of latency between you and the router. Not a huge deal but some people are anal about that kind of thing.These could definitely be cheaper, but for the performance, I can't really complain too much. I will say that you DEFINITELY need to grab a POE filter to put on the line coming into the house to block any of your traffic from making it to your neighbors, as well as some MoCA compatible splitters depending on how everything in your home is wired. 5Fast and Reliable I purchased my first pair a year ago. I'm very happy with their performance and reliability. They never give me any troubles. The connection speed is supper fast. In my configuration, I can top the speed at 900+Mbps in iperf3 tests.I heard there was a connectivity issue in its firmware. When the first pair arrived, I flushed their firmware to 2.11.1.10.6200.1 immediately. I never observe the issue with this firmware version.To cover all rooms of my house, I just purchased the 2nd pair. The adapters arrived with a newer firmware 2.11.1.50.6200.7. They work great together with the old adapters. But I thought it is a good idea to make all my 4 in sync, so that I sent a customer service request to Actiontec via email. They responded quickly with a new firmware 2.11.1.50.6200.727 and installation instructions embedded.Then I made a mistake: since the firmware Actiontec sent to me has a higher number, I flushed all my 4 ECB6200s. It turns out that actually the new pair has a different hardware version. The old adapters work well with the latest firmware, but the new adapters were very unstable.Then I contacted Actiontec again. They were very responsive. They realized the issue immediately and sent me 2.11.1.50.6200.7. Fortunately the pair was not bricked. After applying this version, they just came back to normal.1. There are at least 2 different types of ECB6200. One is with solid cover on its back, has hardware version 2A. The other has vent cover, version is 2C.2. Hardware 2A's latest firmware is 2.11.1.50.6200.727; Hardware 2C's latest firmware is 2.11.1.50.6200.73. You can submit service request to get the latest firmware.4. Actiontec's customer service is responsive and professional.Overall I'm satisfied with my ECB6200s. The only drawback, or say minor issue, is that its latency is slightly higher than Ethernet cable: 3~5ms vs almost 0ms in PING. I think it is acceptable. 5USE THIS TO REPLACE YOUR VERIZON FIOS ROUTER Actiontec Bonded MoCA 2.0 Ethernet to Coax Adapter (ECB6200S02) The main reason I bought this product was to get rid of my Verizon Quantum Gateway Router. I recently upgraded my Verizon internet to their "Gigabit" plan which they run a cat6 cable from the ONT directly to the router. This means if you are on the internet only plan, you can use any router you like.Recently I upgrade my router to the Netgear Nighthawk X10 router and it was plug and play, no config needed. Since I do have a cable box this did require me to use the Quantum router as a bridge to still provide the STB with internet. NOT ANYMORE.With this adapter, I was able to completely remove the Verizon Quantum router from the loop and not use it at all. What you need to do follows:1. Configure the MOCA bridge as Amin M. Astaneh said in another review To do so you will need to connect to the devices one by one over Ethernet: * manually configure your interface for 192.168.144.2, netmask 255.255.255.0, gateway 192.168.144.1 * plug your computer directly into the adapter using an ethernet cable * connect to 192.168.144.30 in your browser * go to Configuration and change the RF channel to a different value. I believe I used value 1600. You can also take the opportunity to set a new PSK to encrypt the traffic being exchanged on the MOCA network. You will know that the procedure was successful if: * the adapters still display green link lights when plugged into coax; * the Verizon router does not show the Actiontec devices as DHCP clients. These devices are an excellent option if Powerline isn't working for you and your house is wired with coax. see less2. Plug your Ethernet into your WAN port on your new 3rd party router ( might have to do a DHCP release to get this working, I did not)3. On the Coax port labeled "Coax IN" plug the coax cable into the bridge that is coming to from the ONT box.4. On the Coax port labeled " TV/STB Out" plug the coax cable into the bridge that is coming directly from your STB.5. Plug an Ethernet cable into a LAN port from your 3rd party router into the bridge. At this point, you should now have the Coax and Power light on the MOCA bridge lit up.6. reboot your STB(s) ( I only had one but this should also work if you have multiple STB's in a loop).After this, you should have your STB rebooted and working fully ( minus the caller ID on your TV for any landlines, I don't use this feature so I cannot speak to this functionality but this is what I have read from other sources. Take it with a grain of salt).I cannot speak for the reliability of the Actiontec MOCA bridge just yet but What I do know that it is working as is intended running NO Verizon hardware ( with the exception of the STB.) I will update this review after 90 days or so to speak to this portion, but for now, it gets 5 stars! Stay tuned. 5Was initially unable to get it to work properly but eventually figured it out! So far, I have been unable to get it to work properly with my Comcast triple play X1 service. Internet speed is extremely variable, internet connects but cuts off for several seconds frequently. Not sure if these issues are related to the Actiontec adapters themselves, my Comcast service or the wiring inside my house. Will update this review if and when I am able to figure it out. So far, neither Actiontec nor Comcast support have been very helpful.Am updating my review and changing it to 5 stars after I figured out how to get this adapter, and two others I bought separately, to work properly. Turned out that the Actiontec adapters were not the problem and that it was an amplifier that Comcast had installed at my point of entry into the house was incompatible with MoCa and that is what was causing the Actiontec adapters to malfunction. Comcast had no clue and was totally unable to help with anything but I eventually figured this out by trial and error and purchased a MoCa compatible amplifier from Amazon (see included link for the model I purchased) to replace the one that Comcast had installed. Once I did that the Actiontec's have performed flawlessly and we now have by far the best internet coverage all over our house since we first got Comcast service here way back in the 1990's. We now have internet strength and speeds in various parts of the house where the Actiontec adapters have been installed that are exactly the same as those available at the main Comcast router.This MoCa technology is awesome and given most homes have coax cables already installed in many rooms, offers a superb and reasonably inexpensive solution in addressing weak or non existent internet service in various parts of homes that so many people face. It is really a shame that not many people know about it. Only advice to potential buyers is that you will need a direct coax line from the point of entry to the house, or from the amplifier located at that point of entry, to the room/outlet that you want to install the adapters. If there are splitters in between, particularly splitters that are not MoCa compliant, the adapters may not function properly.Highly recommend these adapters and have already convinced other family members to get some for their own homes that they have noow done and are also very pleased with.PCT 8 Port Cable TV Splitter Signal Booster/Amplifier with Active Return Zero Signal Loss and Integrated MoCA Filter 5Flawless 4k steaming; Nearly gigabit speeds; Amazing! I'm going to focus my review on some of the questions I had before purchasing. For some context, I have comcast 200 megabit download, 10 megabit upload. I purchased this product to get a wired connection from my NAS to my nvidia shield on my TV for video streaming, as well as a wired internet connection in another room across the house. For both applications, wifi would have been a major performance hit. I am only running through about 30 feet of RG6 coax.My setup involved replacing my 2 way splitter with a 4 way. This caused some loss of power, however the signal at my house is very good and comcast had installed a "pad" that reduced the power so all I had to do was remove the pad to make my signal normal. I was able to verify this through my SB6183 modem login screen.The first question I had when I purchased this was how it would work with the coax passed through the device to the modem, as there is only one coax wall outlet where my modem is located. It works perfectly, I was pleasantly surprised. I was worried the power would be reduced further like a second splitter or it wouldn't work at all, but neither is the case. Works great.The second question I had (which was answered by other reviews but hard for me to believe) was the performance. To my amazement, they perform just as well as a gigabit ethernet cable with the exception of a couple MS of lag. No big deal. Wired my speed test shows 28ms, and through the MOCA adapter it is 30ms. The speed is nearly identical. Im talking identical user experience to using an ethernet cable. I transferred a file from my NAS and it was gigabit speed.I am able to stream 4k content from my NAS on my nvidia shield TV now; something I was not able to do previously.You will need a POE filter for this at the point where the internet enters your house to prevent it "backflowing" through the cable into your neighborhood. Costs $10 and I already had one from the previous home owners having a DVR system that needed one (probably because it also used MOCA).I have tested twitch steaming and gaming through these devices and they work just as well as ethernet. The extra 2-3ms lag is virtually insignificant. You wouldn't know its there without the numbers to confirm it.Too long; don't read:Excellent, almost identical to gigabit performance. Modem can be passed through the device with no power loss. 1ghz splitters are fine, at least for me. Get a POE filter. 5Ethernet via Coax setup with no cable connection Had I listened to the helpdesk at Actiontec, I wouldn't have had this today. We have a residential fiber network (AT&T Gigapower), similar to Google Fiber in RTP. The ONT (Optical Network Terminal) has an ethernet out that goes into the AT&T Router. We have been cable-free for some time and hence the cable lines have remained unused. The ground floor is where the router is located. The first floor has coax outlets in all the rooms but no ethernet outputs and as a consequence, we were stuck with having a Gigabit ethernet that only worked in a single room. We use Apple Extreme as the router (in Bridge mode) which helped (802.11ac since AT&T limits their Wi-Fi to 300 Mbps) but as the ~ gigabit speed is only available via the 5 Ghz connection, the strength quickly drops over a distance. I called Actiontec and they advised that if I didn't have "Cable Modem" it won't work. I saw the videos on Youtube and the support documentation which did not ask for a Cable Modem. You'd think that Actiontec - as the manufacturer would know what they are selling but evidently doesn't. It is a shame considering that the product is very capable.I took some notes as I set up my environment which I have provided below --Items Actiontec Bonded Moca 2.0 Adapters (2) Coaxial Cable Stripper (Can use any ordinary wire cutter) 4 X 1 Coaxial Splitter Coaxial ConnectorsSteps1) Connect Actiontec Adapter 1 in the room (Living Room) with the router2) In the cable box, connect coax outlet from Living Room to the other coaxial cables where you want to provide Ethernet connectivity3) Connect adapter in other rooms where the coax was connected to (from 2)Notes: If the coax cables in the cable box do not have connectors, use a coax stripper to attach connectors (sold at Home Depot / Lowe s) The Coax indicator on the Actiontec adapter will light up only after a bi-directional connection has been established. This can take 15-30 seconds depending on your coax setup, etc I was able to obtain the advertised speeds after testing with iperf3 between 2 devices linked via Actiontec in different rooms In order to test whether your Actiontec kit is working, you can connect the Coax In connectors of each adapter together with a coax cable. Connect the Ethernet port of one adapter (say adapter 1) to the router and the Ethernet port of the other adapter (adapter 2) to a device. This should establish a link as follows Router -> Adapter1_Ethernet -> Adapter1_CoaxIn -> Adapter2_CoaxIn -> Adapter2_Ethernet -> Adapter2_Device_Connected_To_The_EthernetThis should light up the Coax indicators on both the adapters.-----Hope this helps. This is a very simple installation and just requires connecting wires together to make it work. I know there is quite a bit of confusion online over how it works. My situation was made simpler by the fact that I didn't have any cable connection and got to use the coax network solely for the purpose of making the ethernet network. The only challenge I had was making sure that the coax cables were connected to one another - when I initially did the setup it didn't work and this was because none of the wires were actually connected in the cable box. The Coax light also takes a few seconds to come on and it does so once a round-trip connection has been established - for those who have not been able to get this to work, I'd suggest trying the round-trip adapter <-> adapter test and if that works, then you may have an issue with the coax cables. Lastly, if you have several cable connections a coax connection tester (such as a coaxial tone tester from Holland) would help. If nothing works, get a cable guy to set up a connection similar to how I have shown it in the attached picture. Please feel free to let me know if there are any further improvements to this I could make. As my disclaimer -- These steps worked for me, but I don't know enough about coax/electrical/etc to say this it would work for everyone, so use your best judgment before purchasing the items. Thanks! 5Works well with Verizon FIOS (with special configs) The home I currently rent is not wired for ethernet. My office PC is upstairs, and the TV, servers, and Verizon MOCA router are downstairs in the living room. It's been a constant struggle to get gigabit speeds upstairs.I tried using two 802.11AC routers with a bridged connection. I experienced latency spikes and intermittent drops.Powerline caps out at 75Mbps on their gigabit-rated adapters.Once installed, these adapters supported a 750Mbps result using iperf. Finally, success!However, I learned that these by default will peer with the MOCA router provided by Verizon and totally mess up your network topology if you're not too careful, especially for people that isolate their network behind a custom router not provided by their ISP. This creates a race condition where either router will hand out a DHCP lease. The simplest solution is is to change the operating frequency of the MOCA adapters so they cannot communicate with the Verizon router.To do so you will need to connect to the devices one by one over Ethernet:* manually configure your interface for 192.168.144.2, netmask 255.255.255.0, gateway 192.168.144.1* plug your computer directly into the adapter using an ethernet cable* connect to 192.168.144.30 in your browser* go to Configuration and change the RF channel to a different value. I believe I used value 1600. You can also take the opportunity to set a new PSK to encrypt the traffic being exchanged on the MOCA network.You will know that the procedure was successful if:* the adapters still display green link lights when plugged into coax;* the Verizon router does not show the Actiontec devices as DHCP clients.These devices are an excellent option if Powerline isn't working for you and your house is wired with coax. 5
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